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  • Wire Size

    I need to run a line to a well pump. I haven't picked out the pump, phases or voltage yet. What makes sense for a 3,200' run? I may also want to drop another line at 3,000' for a second well and 2,500' for the chlorination equipment.

    Mark
    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

  • #2
    Re: Wire Size

    I think it wouldbe cheaper to build a new house next to the well!!

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Wire Size

      Well to answer the question one NEEDS to know the voltage the pump operates on, and the current the pump draws. Without that data one cannot calculate the wire size. I can tell you this, the higher the voltage motoer you use, the better ie: 240v better than 120v. Also, if you have 3 phase, that's even better. Again, the HP/current and voltage MUST be know first.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Wire Size

        Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
        I need to run a line to a well pump. I haven't picked out the pump, phases or voltage yet. What makes sense for a 3,200' run? I may also want to drop another line at 3,000' for a second well and 2,500' for the chlorination equipment.

        Mark
        You CANNOT be serious......

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Wire Size

          Originally posted by Pipestone Kid View Post
          I think it wouldbe cheaper to build a new house next to the well!!
          LOL-I wish it were so easy but this is for our water company in Utah. I would like to have the power company install a new transformer at 2,500' but I am in the minority.

          Mark
          "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

          I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Wire Size

            mark, would a solar array with an inverter be feasible, along with a back up generator?

            are the lines running above ground or buried?

            what depth/ head and gpm are you looking for?

            i thought your donkeys were there to fetch the pail of water

            rick.

            ps. make sure johnny doesn't fall into the well
            phoebe it is

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Wire Size

              the irrigaton wells for the irrigaiton circles, have a minimm run of 1300 feet, and it is 480 volts, (the higher the voltage the ligher the wire one can use) there are some wells set on a section and the run is at least 2700 feet of run, and many are running 100 hp plus motors,

              the other option would to run at the highest voltage one can and then transform it down to what ever is need at the well site, or other sites if needed,
              Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
              attributed to Samuel Johnson
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Wire Size

                Originally posted by QROKING View Post
                Well to answer the question one NEEDS to know the voltage the pump operates on, and the current the pump draws. Without that data one cannot calculate the wire size. I can tell you this, the higher the voltage motoer you use, the better ie: 240v better than 120v. Also, if you have 3 phase, that's even better. Again, the HP/current and voltage MUST be know first.
                Because we are wide open for options down to the fact there currently isn't even a transformer. The only fact is we will be pumping 100 gpm from 120' draw down.

                Mark
                "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Wire Size

                  Mark, You would be wise to Buy BHD a plane ticket .
                  Last edited by toolaholic; 04-10-2012, 10:51 AM. Reason: spelin
                  I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Wire Size

                    Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
                    Because we are wide open for options down to the fact there currently isn't even a transformer. The only fact is we will be pumping 100 gpm from 120' draw down.

                    Mark
                    those two parameters should dictate what size your pump and motor will be and then you can select motor voltage. from there you'll know the current and can add in some reserve capacity for future. You best bet would be for the utility to install a transformer as close as you can afford to and run as has been said the highest voltage available from there. Each step down with a transformer will cost you something in efficiency; some power will be lost in the form of heat in a xmfr. But if you could get 1.2KV or 4KV run in from the road a couple thousand feet that would be good. Then 460 3ph from there to your pump. You would need a large solar array to power a pump of this size for even 12 hr/day, but you could install a solar array and use it to offset the cost of electric, just don't depend on it to power the pump, sell it all back to the utility.
                    ---------------
                    Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                    ---------------
                    “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                    ---------
                    "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
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                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Wire Size

                      my guess is a 10 hp pump, 10 hp Flint and Walling 6" Submersible Water Well Pumps IF I am looking at the specifications correctly it looks like the 6" 10hp would pump the 125 feet, (not a recommendation for the pump, but an example).

                      460 volt motor of 10 hp should pull any where between 14 and 17 amps depending on its efficiency, Electrical Motor - Full Load Current

                      say figure 25 amp load at 460/480 volts three phase, for a 5% voltage drop at 3200 feet, it looks like one would need, a 2/0 wire in aluminum to Carry that, that would most likely need 4 runs of it, for most systems, voltage calculator I used, Voltage Drop Calculator - for single and 3 phase ac systems and dc systems


                      south west wire calculator,
                      Voltage Drop Calculator
                      1 conductors per phase utilizing a #2/0 Aluminum conductor will limit the voltage drop to 4.91% or less when supplying 25.0 amps for 3200 feet on a 460 volt system.
                      For Engineering Information Only:
                      135.0 Amps Rated ampacity of selected conductor
                      0.16 Ohms Resistance (Ohms per 1000 feet)
                      0.043 Ohms Reactance (Ohms per 1000 feet)
                      23.000000000000004 volts maximum allowable voltage drop at 5%
                      22.551. Actual voltage drop loss at 4.91% for the circuit
                      0.9 Power Factor
                      **Note to User:All ampacity values are taken from the Section of 310-15 of the NEC. The conductor characteristics are taken from Table 9 of the NEC. The calculations used to determine the recommended conductor sizes for branch circuits are based on 60°C ampacity ratings for circuits rated 100 amps or less or marked for use with #14 AWG - #1 AWG. Circuits rated over 100 amps or marked for conductors larger than #1 AWG are determined using 75°C ampacity ratings. Calculations to determine service and feeder conductor sizes are based on overcurrent device ratings rather than actual expected loads which are conservative and may yield oversized conductors. No calculations take into account temperature correction factors or conductor de-rating.
                      This voltage drop calculator is applicable only to NEC applications. It does not optimize conductor sizes for several different loads at various points in a circuit. The total combined load and length of the circuit must be used. Consult with an engineer if your application requires more complex engineering calculations.
                      now if your only pulling 15 amps, your voltage dorp would be only about 3% using 2/0 wire, at 3200 feet,


                      If one would want less than 5% to 3% drop, at 25 amps, 480 volts,
                      1 conductors per phase utilizing a #300 Aluminum conductor will limit the voltage drop to 2.88% or less when supplying 25.0 amps for 3200 feet on a 480 volt system.
                      For Engineering Information Only:
                      230.0 Amps Rated ampacity of selected conductor
                      0.076 Ohms Resistance (Ohms per 1000 feet)
                      0.041 Ohms Reactance (Ohms per 1000 feet)
                      14.399999999999999 volts maximum allowable voltage drop at 3%
                      13.804. Actual voltage drop loss at 2.88% for the circuit
                      0.9 Power Factor
                      **Note to User:All ampacity values are taken from the Section of 310-15 of the NEC. The conductor characteristics are taken from Table 9 of the NEC. The calculations used to determine the recommended conductor sizes for branch circuits are based on 60°C ampacity ratings for circuits rated 100 amps or less or marked for use with #14 AWG - #1 AWG. Circuits rated over 100 amps or marked for conductors larger than #1 AWG are determined using 75°C ampacity ratings. Calculations to determine service and feeder conductor sizes are based on overcurrent device ratings rather than actual expected loads which are conservative and may yield oversized conductors. No calculations take into account temperature correction factors or conductor de-rating.
                      This voltage drop calculator is applicable only to NEC applications. It does not optimize conductor sizes for several different loads at various points in a circuit. The total combined load and length of the circuit must be used. Consult with an engineer if your application requires more complex engineering calculations.
                      all voltage drop was figured with direct bury on the wire,

                      Think I figured it correctly, but do not use my figures, find your pump and take the specifications and work it out form there,
                      Last edited by BHD; 04-10-2012, 03:55 PM.
                      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                      attributed to Samuel Johnson
                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Wire Size

                        Contacting your local power company to get a price to build a line to the pump is free

                        If the power company built a line you would own very little and you also would have very little to maintain if something went wrong

                        Comment

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