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  • #16
    Re: Conduit question

    The placement of "such as" leads me to believe he is only speaking of the conduit...liquid tight vs. Another

    That is neither here nor there. I would like an Electrician to say what type of wires should he/could he use in this application.
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    • #17
      Re: Conduit question

      Never run romex in any condum !
      I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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      • #18
        Re: Conduit question

        Originally posted by Gettinit View Post
        I would like an Electrician to say what type of wires should he/could he use in this application.
        THHN/THWN conductors appropriately sized for the load and the application.

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        • #19
          Re: Conduit question

          So I'm curious tool, here alot of our furnaces are installed in unfinished basements and the electricians will run romex through the joists to the furnace and then sleeve it in rigid conduit to the switch on the side of the furnace. I can tell you, 90% of the basements I have been in have the furnace wired this way. Heck, alot of them have done this for AC water heaters as well. Both of mine are wired this way and were done that way when the house was built. They even sell a rigid conduit to romex connector, and its made for this vary application. Now, I'm not an electrician, but I've seen it done A LOT and it always has passed, so I'm not sure I understand the problem. Personally I would rather have a non-spliced connection from the panel to my furnace than romex to a junction box that has conduit to the furnace with THHN run inside with it spliced in the junction box. To me, a straight connection with 4-5' of romex safely tucked into conduit for the drop seems a lot safer to me, but what do I know.

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          • #20
            Re: Conduit question

            Originally posted by Alphacowboy View Post
            So I'm curious tool, here alot of our furnaces are installed in unfinished basements and the electricians will run romex through the joists to the furnace and then sleeve it in rigid conduit to the switch on the side of the furnace. I can tell you, 90% of the basements I have been in have the furnace wired this way. Heck, alot of them have done this for AC water heaters as well. Both of mine are wired this way and were done that way when the house was built. They even sell a rigid conduit to romex connector, and its made for this vary application. Now, I'm not an electrician, but I've seen it done A LOT and it always has passed, so I'm not sure I understand the problem. Personally I would rather have a non-spliced connection from the panel to my furnace than romex to a junction box that has conduit to the furnace with THHN run inside with it spliced in the junction box. To me, a straight connection with 4-5' of romex safely tucked into conduit for the drop seems a lot safer to me, but what do I know.
            I have pulled a lot of permits in SF over the years. All of their amendmendts to the codes are very strict. I was taught many Years ago this is an unaceptable pratice. It is not done in our area at all.Why do it?
            I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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            • #21
              Re: Conduit question

              Originally posted by Alphacowboy View Post
              So I'm curious tool, here alot of our furnaces are installed in unfinished basements and the electricians will run romex through the joists to the furnace and then sleeve it in rigid conduit to the switch on the side of the furnace. I can tell you, 90% of the basements I have been in have the furnace wired this way. Heck, alot of them have done this for AC water heaters as well. Both of mine are wired this way and were done that way when the house was built. They even sell a rigid conduit to romex connector, and its made for this vary application. Now, I'm not an electrician, but I've seen it done A LOT and it always has passed, so I'm not sure I understand the problem. Personally I would rather have a non-spliced connection from the panel to my furnace than romex to a junction box that has conduit to the furnace with THHN run inside with it spliced in the junction box. To me, a straight connection with 4-5' of romex safely tucked into conduit for the drop seems a lot safer to me, but what do I know.
              This is a sleeve for protection. It is 100% LEGAL (in MOST normal areas) and is PERFECTLY fine & acceptable.

              This IS NOT considered "running romex in conduit".

              Toolaholic, please stop trying to pass off your odd local California amendments/requirement as normal or better in some way.
              Either way, PLEASE tell me the danger or significance of wiring a furnace the way Alpha described above, and please don't use the lame heat build up claim for a 3-4 foot run.


              So tool, let's say you need a receptacle on a block or poured wall. Do you run NM to a box up in the ceiling, then change over to THHN to go down the wall in pipe? How would you do this?
              Last edited by Speedy Petey; 05-30-2012, 05:34 AM.

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              • #22
                Re: Conduit question

                Originally posted by Speedy Petey View Post
                This is a sleeve for protection. It is 100% LEGAL (in MOST normal areas) and is PERFECTLY fine & acceptable.

                This IS NOT considered "running romex in conduit".

                Toolaholic, please stop trying to pass off your odd local California amendments/requirement as normal or better in some way.
                Either way, PLEASE tell me the danger or significance of wiring a furnace the way Alpha described above, and please don't use the lame heat build up claim for a 3-4 foot run.


                So tool, let's say you need a receptacle on a block or poured wall. Do you run NM to a box up in the ceiling, then change over to THHN to go down the wall in pipe? How would you do this?
                Same way as Youjust described it.
                Maybe we'll all start running romex in in conduit in S.F. to make You Happy. You're starting to look like a slinky to this
                Irishman.
                I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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                • #23
                  Re: Conduit question

                  Originally posted by toolaholic View Post
                  Maybe we'll all start running romex in in conduit in S.F. to make You Happy.
                  I have NO idea why you think that would make me happy. Please explain.

                  You do anything you want, I really don't give a damn, just don't go around saying everyone else is wrong when YOUR area is the one that is off base with the rest of the normal country.
                  Running NM in conduit systems is hacky and poor workmanship IN MY OPINION. Running a few feet of NM in an EMT sleeve for protection in areas subject to damage is STANDARD INDUSTRY PRACTICE.

                  What I don't get is why I am arguing electrical codes and practices with a GC.

                  Originally posted by toolaholic View Post
                  You're starting to look like a slinky to this
                  Irishman.
                  You are one strange bird, you know that.

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                  • #24
                    Re: Conduit question

                    My appolagies Pete. I just read NEC 334.15 b&c on attic and basement running boards. It states , as You said, NM can be run in conduit. Yes I am a strange bird indeed! But You should meet Me Brother! What else would expect from a G.C.ANYWAY ?
                    I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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                    • #25
                      Re: Conduit question

                      Speedy Petey is absolutely correct. There are alot of myths out there. When you see romex in conduit the conduit it is usually just for physical protection. (like the furnace) some of the rules are more laxed for sleeving.

                      When romex is pulled into a conduit the cable is treated as one wire and conduit can not be filled more than 53% when one wire is in it. Romes is isually 1/2" wide (considered the dia.) or an area of .163 and 1/2" conduit would only alow .161 square inches. So in most cases it would need to be 3/4" conduit or larger. An actual measurment of the cable is needed to calculate.

                      While I agree that pulling romex into conduit (sleeving for physical protection is not a raceway) is kind of a hack way of doing it, it can be alowed. Too often the AHJ will say I dont like this.. or Iheard this is a no no.

                      Bottom line is cite a code refrence where something is or isnt alowed and everything else is moot.

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