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  • Running 6 Amp wire

    Hello,
    Background: I have built a shed in my back yard and have been given three strands of 6 Amp wire, white, black and green. Each wire is 60 feet long; problem is, I need 70 feet.

    Question: Can wire this heavy somehow be spliced (pigtailed) together? In other words, can I somehow safely add an additional 10 feet of wire and make the connection inside a box? Or, must I now buy 210 feet of new wire? If I can, what do I need to buy, beside the additional 30 feet of wire and how is the connection made?

    Thank you for your assistance.

    Dock

  • #2
    Re: Running 6 Amp wire

    dock, welcome to the forum.

    based on your terminology / understanding of electrical i would suggest to hire a pro. granted i'm not a licensed electrician. but honestly you either have a 6 amp load for your shed, or you have 6 gauge wire which is pretty heavy wire. your colors as is are color coded for 120 volts, unless you properly mark them for 240 volts and then you're missing a neutral wire or another hot leg.

    i would think an approved underground splice/ pull box and water tight connectors would be expensive. but an above ground splice/ pull box is relatively cheap.

    don't want to see the dock needing a doc on their first post

    rick.
    phoebe it is

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Running 6 Amp wire

      Thanks Rick

      Sorry for the mix-up with electrical terminology.

      I’ll try this again. I have three strands of 6 gauge wire, green, white and black, each is 60 feet long. Wire was given to me; problem is, I need 70 feet to reach from circuit breaker panel box in the garage to a new 60 amp sub panel circuit breaker box in a newly built shed. I was told this is the correct size wire gauge for this length of run. Twenty-five feet of this will run underground through a 1” conduit, 18” below ground level, according to code in my area.

      It will be used only as 120 volt circuits for 4 outlets, a ceiling light and an exhaust fan.

      I have two choices: splice a 10 foot piece of wire onto each 60 foot piece or buy and run a whole new wire 70 feet long (210 total feet). The splice box will be located inside the garage, above the ceiling, 9.5 feet away from the main breaker box.

      It’s a matter of economics, 30 feet of wire at $2.00 a foot is a whole lot less expensive than $420.00 for 210 feet of new wire. To hire an electrician to do this will add an additional $475.00 (least expensive bid of three) for a total of approximately $535.00 to $895.00.

      True, I’m not an electrician, but I am retired and funds are limited. As an experienced handyman, I consider this within my capabilities; once I learn if it can be done and how to do it. Yes, I know there is a great deal of harm potential inside the breaker box.

      Thank you for your consideration and help.

      Dock

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Running 6 Amp wire

        If you can splice it inside the building and in a box I doubt if there is a problme, if the wire meets code for the location it is to be used, and a conduit will be use,

        (I would sugest a larger conduit, easer to pull, and if any one wants to add the second hot leg for 240 volt, there is space for it,)
        actuly I would sugest to run at this time.
        Last edited by BHD; 09-01-2012, 09:52 AM.
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        • #5
          Re: Running 6 Amp wire

          My advice would be to hire an electrician. Do you know if the wire you have is suitable for use in wet locations? If it's not, you cannot use it even if you are running it through conduit. There are more code considerations when installing a sub panel in a detached building fed from your house such as ground rods for the sub panel a FOUR wire feeder cable and separation of grounds and neutrals in the sub panel. If all you want is a few outlets and lights you could run #10 ga. wire from your house panel to a 2 gang box in your shed and install a switch for the lights and your first receptacle and feed a couple more off the first device. The first receptacle should be a GFCI and will protect the others down line. #10 ga. wire will have a voltage drop of less than 2% for the length of run you are working with. Since you are running #10 ga. from your house and will be using #12 #14 ga. wire for your receptacles and lighting you would downsize the breaker feeding from the house to the rated ampacity of the smallest wire used (15 amps). 100 feet of 10-2 UF-B is about $115 dollars at Home Depot.

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          • #6
            Re: Running 6 Amp wire

            dock, thanks for clarifying.

            1 - 120 volt / 60 amp circuit is not a balanced load. of course if it's all under 20 amps/ 2400 watts, it's not an issue. but honestly with the wire you already have, i would either sell it or scrap it and buy the 10 gauge wire that will have a 30 amp rating. buy 10-3 with ground or pull 4 wires/ (red,black, white, green) then you have 240 volt possibility and a balanced panel.

            rick.
            phoebe it is

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Running 6 Amp wire

              Please accept my appreciation for your very kind and helpful advice and information. You all have given me real food for thought and cause to do more research; and, to revisit the consideration of possibility hiring a qualified electrician.

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