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? electric motors?

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  • ? electric motors?

    question,

    what is the difference of a compressor motor verses a general duty motor, of the same HP and RPMs

    I notice many of the compressor duty motors are 56 frame.
    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
    attributed to Samuel Johnson
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

  • #2
    Re: ? electric motors?

    a compressor duty motor is able to handle more tork than a standard duty motor.
    The frame is just a measurement of the base (distance between bolts)

    As a side note; It has become common for companies like craftsman to BS real HP ratings. They call it "developed" HP. This is a sales ploy to make people think they are getting more power. Although its true HP is not inherent in the motor, a free wheeling motor without a load should not be compared to a true HP or KW rating.
    Last edited by johncameron; 02-09-2013, 11:42 PM.

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    • #3
      Re: ? electric motors?

      OK say I have a wood planer, and I jsut fried the motor on it, and
      I see the 56 frame compressor duty motors for $250 (example Leeson 5 HP ODP Air Comp Electric Motor 230V 3450 rpm 5/8 Shaft 111275

      general duty motor usaly a larger frame, for $400 both claim 5 hp,
      Leeson 116708.00 5HP 3450RPM 56H DP /230V 1PH 60HZ Cont Manual

      or
      H5390 Motor 5 HP Single-Phase 3450 RPM TEFC 220V

      which is the better motor, for my wood planer, or which is the best value, may be the better question.
      Last edited by BHD; 02-10-2013, 12:16 AM.
      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
      attributed to Samuel Johnson
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: ? electric motors?

        The h5390 has better air cooling and is better suited for your planer. You don't need the instant tork and resultant higher starting current that's necessary for instantly starting a large load (compressor).
        You will be starting your planer with no load and then when its up to speed you will apply a load (when you start making saw dust)

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        • #5
          Re: ? electric motors?

          The frame isn't important except for will it fit. Check the amperage on the motor. The rated amps then the SF Amps. SF is for service factor. Most of these BS'ed up motors are 1.0 SF. If you multiply SF X rated hp, you get true horsepower. That is with a real motor. These motors that have SP or Special in the horsepower slot could be anything. The company making the claim determines the horsepower on the label.

          I agree that with your planer both should be fine. No heavy starting torque is needed. Just don't pull the motors rpm's down too far when using the planer.

          I could go on a rant about horsepower claims, but I had better keep that stuff to myself.
          Frequently asked questions about pumps and tanks.

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          • #6
            Re: ? electric motors?

            Good point about sf, though running a motor beyond its rating will ultimately lead to shorter life of the motor. Certainly a good thing to have a higher sf but probably not an issue when replacing a motor with similar size/ratings.

            One important thing to check is overload protection.(Not to be confused with overcurrent protection by a fuse or CB) If your new motor has a diferent fla (amps)on the nameplate, you need to make sure your thermal overload (probably heaters elements on a motor starter) are sized correctly.

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            • #7
              Re: ? electric motors?

              Originally posted by speedbump View Post
              I could go on a rant about horsepower claims, but I had better keep that stuff to myself.
              Please start another thread and rant away. I like to learn that way.
              ~~

              ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

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