Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

whole house surge protector, were to put it?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by BHD View Post
    Re: whole house surge protector, were to put it?

    my thinking would be the closer to the front of the use or at the beginning of the system the better off one would be, but that is more of a mechanical thinking, but it may still hold true

    yes if it could go on the top two/first slots of the breaker box, (never saw a breaker type surge protector tho), I would think it would be better, but even if it was on the bottom two slots, my guess is there would be no difference in the operation of it, as the buss is still large and connected to all the breakers,
    I can confirm there should be no difference as well. This is how it works on most boxes.

    Originally posted by BHD View Post
    now if you had a sub panel and second sub panel off of the first sub panel and one choose to put the surge protector in the second sub panel yes it would protect the entire system, but I doubt if it would do as good as if in the main box, as there are other components it has to travel through before it gets to the surge protector, and wires of various resistance, thus possibly changing some of the values of the surge and having more opportunity to infiltrate other components along the way,

    but it is like a presser tank on a well or an expansion tank on hot water heater, in a way, normally the practice is to put the tank near the well or the heater, but if you have good piping with out major restriction the tank can go any where on the line and work,

    IN electricity things happen so fast, (close to the speed of light), that if there is a surge my guess it is everywhere in what we would call instantly, and if the surge protector can not respond instantly things are fried regardless of where the safety valve is,

    it is kinda like back in the day of lighting spark gaps, two wires that had a gap and the distance of the gap was adjusted for over voltage arcing, unless the items on the line were hardened or able to take the arcing voltage, they were fried regardless if it arced or not, but if it was a close hit (lighting) normally things were fired regardless as the units could not drain enough off the line to keep the voltage at a "safe level" as the voltage to jump an air gap is so the voltage of an air gap would let ever thing get up to the spark voltage before draining any of it off, the new MOV are basically a veryable unit with a set clamping design, as the video says, and the voltage level is much closer to line votages that it dumps at,

    the GFCI works a little differently as it measures the power going in and coming out and compares the power on the wires, so it has to be before what ever you want protected, (it is like putting an amperage clamp on the black and white wire and comparing them and if any difference occurs it cuts the circuit,

    the surge protector is like a relief valve, any thing over a given setting it dumps the excess pressure out of the system,
    Ultimately all these mechanisms serve to protect sensitive equipment from damage. The worst is when lightning strikes. That is the ultimate test of trip protection.

    Originally posted by Plumber Punky View Post
    The only thing that saves you is "replacement cost" insurance. Nothing will stop the awesome power of nature. The whole house suppressor (known as a TVSS) can be placed anywhere on the load side of the main breaker.
    The important thing is to minimize the length of the conductors. Only one wire can be terminated in one place unless listed as such. The circuit breakers should be in good working order as well.

    the surge protector is like a relief valve, any thing over a given setting it dumps the excess pressure out of the system, IN electricity things happen so fast, (close to the speed of light), that if there is a surge my guess it is everywhere in what we would call instantly, and if the surge protector can not respond instantly things are fried regardless of where the safety valve is,
    Last edited by Pterka; 04-22-2014, 10:02 AM. Reason: original message was truncated

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Pterka View Post
      The only thing that saves you is "replacement cost" insurance. Nothing will stop the awesome power of nature. The whole house suppressor (known as a TVSS) can be placed anywhere on the load side of the main breaker. The important thing is to minimize the length of the conductors. Only one wire can be terminated in one place unless listed as such. The circuit breakers should be in good working order as well.

      the surge protector is like a relief valve, any thing over a given setting it dumps the excess pressure out of the system, IN electricity things happen so fast, (close to the speed of light), that if there is a surge my guess it is everywhere in what we would call instantly, and if the surge protector can not respond instantly things are fried regardless of where the safety valve is,
      quit quoting stuff from others as your own, spammer retard
      ~~

      ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

      Comment


      • #18
        I'm with you Punky. Why dredge-up a post over a year old without anything of substance to offer.

        Oh wait, I got one for the woodworking forum.... When driving a nail, remember not to hit your thumb with the hammer.

        Comment

        Working...
        X