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RD8000 Generator Bonded Neutral

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  • RD8000 Generator Bonded Neutral

    I seen a older post about the bonded neutral on this generator and whether or not it needed to be removed before it can be hook up to the home panel. There never was a conclusion. I would appreciate any infomation anyone has including the location of the jumper that needs to be removed if necessary.

    Thanks,
    Bob M

  • #2
    Re: RD8000 Generator Bonded Neutral

    do it the way the inspector wants it.

    here is a PDF from Mike Holt on stand by and back up generators and the NEC,

    it may help you figure which way is correct for your situation

    http://www.mikeholt.com/download.php...er_Systems.pdf
    Last edited by BHD; 03-15-2013, 02:57 PM.
    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
    attributed to Samuel Johnson
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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    • #3
      Re: RD8000 Generator Bonded Neutral

      Thank you for responding. But this is not going to help me, every electrician I speak to can not tell me if this generator is safe to hook up to the house or not and they are not sure about bonded neutral and some never heard of a it. some are telling me because the 220 outlet is not gcfi protected there suould not be a problem. Ridgid will not even comment on it. I can't beleve that this one peice of vital infomation is not available.

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      • #4
        Re: RD8000 Generator Bonded Neutral

        An electrician cannot tell you if it's safe to hook to the house? So you cant use an extension cord either? Where do you find your electricians? Just curious... I'm a plumber and know what a bonded neutral is.

        As in any situation - if you cannot verify the safety of the product in question, use a different product. If you cannot get information from the brand name on the side of the tool, remember that the name on the side is usually not the actual manufacturer. Try the actual manufacturer of the generator itself, if available.

        Really though, a portable generator is designed for PORTABLE use. If you want a standby generator that's permanently connected, or rated for such use, you should have the proper piece of equipment.
        ~~

        ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

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        • #5
          Re: RD8000 Generator Bonded Neutral

          I can assure you it is safe to hook up to the house and to use. if you use a NEC approved, transfer switch and proper cord to connect it,

          the NEC has changed things and confused things, and the area of generators is (IMO) very confusing,
          nearly all of the generators had a bonded neutral.
          (I have three generators from 4 KW through 30 KW, two portable and one stationary, and they all have the neutral and ground bonded in the generator, three different manufactures)

          the big thing now is they do not want the ground wire for a current carrying conductor, (the ground wire, was never designed to carry current in the circuit, except in a fault situation), and the NEC says there should only be one point of connection in the ground and neutral and normal that is at the first point of disconnect,

          What the deal is the "portable" generators are made for job site use, and thus since the machine is built as a power plant and disconnect and breaker box all in one they bond the ground and the neutral, as that is the point where it meets the ground wire (frame of generator) and neutral, (in theory the generator is to have a ground rod driven and hooked up ever time it is used), but that is hardly done, but the frame and the ground is bonded to IN theory make one less hot wire, or a current carrying wire that is in common with the ground, (earth), that is why one can touch the white wire and not get shocked, (if properly wired) as it is in common with the ground, thus you sense no electrons flowing,
          the same as a bird landing on a power line,

          any way in the last few years they have decided that the ground is the ground and ever thing metal in a house is to be bonded with it, ((so there is a direct path (not through you), to carry any stray or other voltage to the earth)), now to make it effective, there can only be one point of connection as any two points could, if the neutral was to be compromised allow the ground to carry power and make it current carrying, (depending on how messed up the current could be flowing from one point in the ground then on the neutral and back to the ground and then back in the neutral and never any indication of a damaged or shorted wire),

          on some circuits this causes major problems, GFCI that check the flow of current in and out if any is flowing on the ground it will trip, as the amounts are not the same on the hot and neutral wires as some is flowing on the ground,

          now do to the definition of the power unit and if it a required emergency back up unit, can make some difference, and if the neutral is switched as well, my guess is the bond should be removed, to most likely meet the NEC, but the reality of the situation is you have a what 10 foot or so cord, that is 4 wire, your bonded at the generator, your bonded at the breaker box, the only place that the current flow can take place is in that cord, (it is not any different as when you hooked to the grid and it (most likely bonded in the meter housing as well, but since that is the power company that is OK),

          but like I said just do what the inspector wants, if he does not say any thing then do not worry about it and if he says disconnect it then do that,

          but I am not even sure that if it is not stationary and bolted down that it makes any difference,
          If you store the generator in your garage, and then move it out and plug it in to the house via NEC approved receptacle and transfer switch, that it really matters. but as a portable unit i think it being bonded is the safer method on the generator.

          and my guess is why Ridgid does not weigh in on the subject is they built there units to the laws applicable for the generator and the designed use as they intened it to be used, and it really does not make any difference what Ridgid says, as it is what the inspector says, and how the NEC is interpreted,

          but as a job site generator it is wired correctly as to the day it was manufactured on,

          I do not know how the whole house generators are done from the factory, that are stationary and hard wired in,

          Disclaimer: I am not a Electrician or play one on TV, what I wrote above is what I understand, and believe it to be correct,
          Last edited by BHD; 03-15-2013, 06:36 PM.
          Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
          attributed to Samuel Johnson
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: RD8000 Generator Bonded Neutral

            I do not know how the whole house generators are done from the factory
            The Generac units I'm used to installing require all external parts of the unit to be earth grounded. They supply the lug. You supply the rod, wire, and clamp.

            My portable generator also has an external lug for grounding with a rod. The industrial 'portable' I mounted on a trailer also has an external lug.
            ~~

            ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: RD8000 Generator Bonded Neutral

              Any qualified (licensed) electrician should have no problem hooking this up. It is critical he understands if it is a "separately derived system is or not. A SDS involves switching the neutral via a transfer switch. Many gen-sets are meant to operate stand alone and have a internal neutral-ground bond. If this internal bond is not removed it will cause harmful paralell current paths and dangerous currents thrugh the ground (and frame of the generator!) The neutral should be only bonded at the service and not also at the generator. I do not know the details of your install or the specs of your generator to give much advice but I'd refer you to an electrician that cab hook it up safely.

              Just guessing at stuff can put you or someone else in jeopardy.

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