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  • Open ground

    Working in a three family house section 8 today at the behest of the section 8 inspector. he is plugging in his $6 receptacle tester into the 3 prong receptacles and showing an open ground. He says all these have to be converted back to 2 prong receps or GFCI receps and marked no ground. I stick my fluke digital multimeter in from 120V to ground and get 120V. Hmm, what up cowboy?

  • #2
    Re: Open ground

    Originally posted by killavolt View Post
    Working in a three family house section 8 today at the behest of the section 8 inspector. he is plugging in his $6 receptacle tester into the 3 prong receptacles and showing an open ground. He says all these have to be converted back to 2 prong receps or GFCI receps and marked no ground. I stick my fluke digital multimeter in from 120V to ground and get 120V. Hmm, what up cowboy?
    get rid of the Fluke, way too accurate! Sure the inspector isn't on section 8?

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Open ground

      Originally posted by killavolt View Post
      ... I stick my fluke digital multimeter in from 120V to ground and get 120V. Hmm, what up cowboy?
      Can you have a single worthless tiny wire thread conducting to ground and the meter will read 120 volts?

      Why would anyone convert 14-2 or 12-2 with ground to no-ground receptacles when so many appliances, computers, TVs, stereo systems, etc. now require ground?
      I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
      It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
      "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Open ground

        One of my houses had the same problem, when we bought it, someone had put three prong receptacles in each outlet with two wire wiring. Since we were gutting it, it didn't matter, but to get it back to the old code, each receptacle would have to have been replaced with two prongs. Can you even buy the three prong to two prong adapters any more? I haven't seen one in years.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Open ground

          Originally posted by killavolt View Post
          Working in a three family house section 8 today at the behest of the section 8 inspector. he is plugging in his $6 receptacle tester into the 3 prong receptacles and showing an open ground. He says all these have to be converted back to 2 prong receps or GFCI receps and marked no ground. I stick my fluke digital multimeter in from 120V to ground and get 120V. Hmm, what up cowboy?
          Do ALL of them show an open ground?
          How about a test on a known, properly wired, receptacle first to prove his tester is working.
          Are the neutral and ground rolled?
          ---------------
          Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
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          “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
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          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Open ground

            I would test it with a wiggy (loaded meter) to ground, just to make sure you are not getting a false reading (capacitive coupling) Beyond that, you could ring out the neutral home run and verify that it is going all the way back to the panel. (although A cheappy outlet tester would not know the difference)

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Open ground

              Have you removed the cover plate to inspect the receptacle and outlet box
              to see what's going on and visually inspect the wires?
              Then you can determine what has to be done.

              Cactus Man

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Open ground

                It is all BX wired with metal boxes. I have checked them with a wiggy as well. Balls in his court.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Open ground

                  Originally posted by killavolt View Post
                  It is all BX wired with metal boxes. I have checked them with a wiggy as well. Balls in his court.
                  If it is old BX without the bonding strip, it is not acceptable to use the metal sheath as the EGC. It will test as grounded but is not code accepted. 2 wire receptacles or ungrounded GFCIs required.

                  But a $6 tester, a Fluke or a wiggly will not know the difference.

                  BTW, I lived in Southington for many years, Alder Lane off Jude Lane.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Open ground

                    I know the area well RJ, I live in the northern end - Dunham St.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Open ground

                      i have had this issue happen twice too me.. I was were a old dwelling that the original 2 wire rcpts. Had been replaced with 3 wire type. And whoever did it jumped the neutral to the ground screw so both were connect to the neutral conductor.. The other was a house that the 2- wire rcpts. were changed to the 3- wire type and they ran a seperate ground conductor and didnt run it back to the panel, instead they connected them to seperate ground rods not the service ground rod. With my digital tester it would read good.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Open ground

                        Originally posted by Ark&spark View Post
                        i have had this issue happen twice too me.. I was were a old dwelling that the original 2 wire rcpts. Had been replaced with 3 wire type. And whoever did it jumped the neutral to the ground screw so both were connect to the neutral conductor.. The other was a house that the 2- wire rcpts. were changed to the 3- wire type and they ran a seperate ground conductor and didnt run it back to the panel, instead they connected them to seperate ground rods not the service ground rod. With my digital tester it would read good.
                        Both practices are code violations and dangerous. Connecting the neutral and ground at the receptacle is called "bootlegging". If the neutral were to go open, the frame of the device plugged into the receptacle will become live.

                        Using ground rods not boned to the neutral at the main panel will not insure that the breaker will trip if a ground fault occurs.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Open ground

                          had this same situation in the house i recently rewired for a customer
                          outlets were 3 prong grounded outlets and the bx armor had a bonding strip (aluminum) but tested no ground.
                          while pulling the old bx armored cable i found a spot where the armor had rusted through and the bonding strip had also corroded completely.
                          the cable ran across the stone foundation at that point and the owner informed me that that spot was always damp.
                          anyway all the wiring in the basement is now in pvc conduit
                          shooting the s*** is a lot more fun when you use hollow points (much more splatter)

                          coffee hell gimme booze!!!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Open ground

                            Yes, we all understand the eq ground needs to run all the way back to the panel. It was said that it showed no ground with the inspectors plug in tester. It is my contention that his plug tester is bad even if it's a bootlegged ground.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Open ground

                              true
                              these testers often can fail if an over-voltage condition is present.
                              i have a few of them for the wife and i test them regularly on my test bench outlets.
                              if an inspector is using them he needs to have them certified and tested regularly to cover all legal ends so to speak
                              any registered or licensed electrician can test and certify it. certificate does not need to follow any specific format but it should have date tested and the electricians initials on it.
                              I actually affix a small sticker to them with the date, test results, and initials
                              shooting the s*** is a lot more fun when you use hollow points (much more splatter)

                              coffee hell gimme booze!!!

                              Comment

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