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  • #16
    Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

    Originally posted by alcooner View Post
    apartments are the worlds worst when there is washer/dryer hookups in them, there may be 2-3/ 90s in most dryer vents, a big no no and very dangerous. I work in a college town, if some parents knew the dangers in these apartments and houses that these rental companies turn into college rental property, they would think twice.

    here the mechanical code would limit the length of the duct run and number of turns (or their equivalant in feet of duct for each fitting), usually by referring back to the manufacturers instructions but the code may override with more restrictive conditions in some cases. Now if you don't have any applicable building code where you are then you're on your own as to if you follow the installation instructions or not. And if someone is doing it for you and you don't know better then you're at their mercy as to if you get a good install or a hack job that will end up burning your house down next year.
    ---------------
    Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
    ---------------
    “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
    ---------
    "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
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    • #17
      Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

      Originally posted by Plumber Punky View Post
      and if the 30 amp dryer fails catastrophically there is a good possibility the breaker wont trip...the house may burn down or someone could die.
      That may be, however, breakers are not there to protect equipment, they are to protect the conductor. This is not an arguable fact. Overloads are to protect equipment. Unless a piece of equipment has a max circuit rating on the nameplate, an electrician can run as large a circuit to a piece of equipment as they choose so long as they properly protect that conductor.

      "May and could" is fine, however my answer is based purely on the NEC. If you have a code reference that shows where I am wrong, please feel free to point me in the right direction.

      Jeff

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      • #18
        Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

        Originally posted by Plumber Punky View Post
        and if the 30 amp dryer fails catastrophically there is a good possibility the breaker wont trip...the house may burn down or someone could die.
        How is this any different that plugging a 1A radio into a 20A circuit?
        Your position is quite common, but also quite incorrect.


        piette, is dead on with this.

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

          Originally posted by alcooner View Post
          apartments are the worlds worst when there is washer/dryer hookups in them, there may be 2-3/ 90s in most dryer vents, a big no no and very dangerous. I work in a college town, if some parents knew the dangers in these apartments and houses that these rental companies turn into college rental property, they would think twice.
          provided that the venting is still within the specs of the dryer manufacturer the number of elbows doesnt matter. very rarely does anyone ever have a straight out vent system. the manufacturer's instruction book that comes with the dryer unit has the specs for venting.
          ~~

          ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

            Originally posted by Speedy Petey View Post
            How is this any different that plugging a 1A radio into a 20A circuit?
            Your position is quite common, but also quite incorrect.


            piette, is dead on with this.
            i dont plug 1A radios into a 20A circuit. i follow the manufacturer's suggestions regarding ampacity of the circuit and proper wire sizes. that's the reason we dont install 100A breakers and wiring for 20A air conditioners.
            ~~

            ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

              Originally posted by Plumber Punky View Post
              i dont plug 1A radios into a 20A circuit. i follow the manufacturer's suggestions regarding ampacity of the circuit and proper wire sizes.
              What circuit do you use for your small amperage plug in devices? I have only seen 15 or 20 amp as choices.

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

                Originally posted by Plumber Punky View Post
                i dont plug 1A radios into a 20A circuit. i follow the manufacturer's suggestions regarding ampacity of the circuit and proper wire sizes. that's the reason we dont install 100A breakers and wiring for 20A air conditioners.
                When you need to charge a cordless battery or plug in a tv or DVD player or clock do you install separate 1 amp fuses? I'm confused how it is you plug a tv or anything else in in your home when the circuits are rated a minimum of 15 amps.

                Also the reason we don't put 100 amp breakers on a 20 amp a/c is entirely because the condenser has a nameplate on it which specifically states max fuse or breaker size. What does your tv say is the max circuit size on the nameplate?

                Jeff

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                • #23
                  Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

                  The intent of the branch circuit protection is to protect the wiring in the house, not the device being plugged into it.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

                    Originally posted by Plumber Punky View Post
                    i dont plug 1A radios into a 20A circuit.
                    So you never plugged a radio, phone charger, night light, or anything similar into a kitchen receptacle?? I call BS.

                    Also, when have you EVER seen the instructions for a radio or similar item state not to plug into a 20A circuit?

                    Some friendly advice: Stick to plumbing.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

                      FYI to Non-electricians here;
                      Larger Motors circuits (eg.. Inside a dryer) have thermal protection which guards against overloading (Motor Meltdown..if you will...). This overload protection is not the same thing as over current protection. (eg..Circuit Breaker limits current)

                      No dis on anybody here but; I think this forum should be called "Electrical talk" instead of "Electricians Forum" Actual electricians seem to be a minority on this forum. I base this statement on the content of posts, not the accurate occupation titles such as mine.

                      Yes, I know a lot about the other trades too, but I try to keep quiet when giving advice on other forums unless I know what I'm talking about.
                      Last edited by johncameron; 11-28-2013, 10:54 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

                        Originally posted by Speedy Petey View Post
                        So you never plugged a radio, phone charger, night light, or anything similar into a kitchen receptacle?? I call BS.

                        Also, when have you EVER seen the instructions for a radio or similar item state not to plug into a 20A circuit?

                        Some friendly advice: Stick to plumbing.
                        All the electrical devices I own have some sort of internal overload protection. those that are rated per the instructions for 15A receptacles get used there. NONE of the receptacles in my house are of the single pole 20A variety. NONE have a 20A receptacle.

                        Anything that does not have internal overload protection gets that protection before the unit (example - a fused disconnect for AC). Condensers only have a thermal protection internally, no overcurrent protection.
                        ~~

                        ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

                          Originally posted by piette View Post
                          What does your tv say is the max circuit size on the nameplate?
                          15A. it also has internal overcurrent protection. it uses 850 watts if it matters.
                          ~~

                          ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

                            Originally posted by Plumber Punky View Post
                            All the electrical devices I own have some sort of internal overload protection. those that are rated per the instructions for 15A receptacles get used there. NONE of the receptacles in my house are of the single pole 20A variety. NONE have a 20A receptacle.

                            Anything that does not have internal overload protection gets that protection before the unit (example - a fused disconnect for AC). Condensers only have a thermal protection internally, no over-current protection.
                            Even though you do not have any 20 amp receptacles, I would be willing to bet some of the receptacle circuits are 20 amp with 15 amp receptacles. This is perfectly code compliant. In fact if your house has been built within the last 20 years or so, all bathroom and kitchen counter circuits must be 20 amp circuits.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

                              Originally posted by Plumber Punky View Post
                              All the electrical devices I own have some sort of internal overload protection. those that are rated per the instructions for 15A receptacles get used there. NONE of the receptacles in my house are of the single pole 20A variety. NONE have a 20A receptacle.
                              I really think at this point you are writing things just to save face.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

                                Originally posted by Speedy Petey View Post
                                I really think at this point you are writing things just to save face.

                                I think you are wrong. I neednt 'save face' and have been perfectly capable of admitting faults when they have existed. A perfect example would be flexible water lines on water heaters installed in California. Plumber Rick corrected me on that one.

                                Why is it so hard for you to understand that some people ensure the safety of themselves and their equipment by making sure everything is protected? I looked at the panel again - there are NO, NONE, ZERO single pole 20A breakers installed. Want me to post a picture for you?
                                ~~

                                ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

                                Comment

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