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Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

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  • #31
    Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

    Originally posted by Plumber Punky View Post
    I think you are wrong. I neednt 'save face' and have been perfectly capable of admitting faults when they have existed. A perfect example would be flexible water lines on water heaters installed in California. Plumber Rick corrected me on that one.

    Why is it so hard for you to understand that some people ensure the safety of themselves and their equipment by making sure everything is protected? I looked at the panel again - there are NO, NONE, ZERO single pole 20A breakers installed. Want me to post a picture for you?
    I've followed this thread to learn some stuff and agree with stuff. But now I'm lost about the water flex in california remark. Must be an old post that youre referring to and I can't recall all of the post.

    But I do agree, breakers are designed to protect the wiring and not the appliance. If that wasn't the case, my k39 would still be alive the other day

    Black friday, time to shop for a k45, or break out another k39, k38, or k50 with drum adapter. Lots of choices out there.

    Plumber punky, at this point, its hard to win as electricians always think they're 1 up on us plumbers

    We'll correct them next time

    Rick.

    Off to work and then to pick up my new toy.
    phoebe it is

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    • #32
      Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

      Originally posted by Plumber Punky View Post
      Why is it so hard for you to understand that some people ensure the safety of themselves and their equipment by making sure everything is protected? I looked at the panel again - there are NO, NONE, ZERO single pole 20A breakers installed. Want me to post a picture for you?
      Then you're home is not, and never was, in compliance with the NEC, nor is it wired properly or conveniently.

      Comment


      • #33
        Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

        Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post

        Plumber punky, at this point, its hard to win as electricians always think they're 1 up on us plumbers
        This is not at all true (at least in my case) and has NOTHING to do with this situation.
        I WILL profess however that I know considerably more about electric than pretty much any plumber I have ever met, in real life or online.
        Plumbing I leave to you guys. When was the last time I posted in the plumbing forum?? If I remember correctly it was, never.

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        • #34
          Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

          Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
          Plumber punky, at this point, its hard to win as electricians always think they're 1 up on us plumbers

          Rick.
          Agreed.

          Originally posted by Speedy Petey View Post
          Then you're home is not, and never was, in compliance with the NEC, nor is it wired properly or conveniently.
          Never said it was? The house is very old and I'm sure it was wired to code back when it was built.
          ~~

          ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

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          • #35
            Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

            Of course an Electrician is one up on electrical knowledge, It's his trade.

            His house may be grandfathered in as code.

            Plumber Punky; If you post the actual listing instructions to the appliance in question we can give you a definitive answer. In general the rating of an appliance is talking about the minimum ampacity of a circuit. If something is rated 20amp it needs to be plugged into a 20amp circuit Not a 15a. If the rating is 15a, there is nothing wrong with plugging it into an outlet with a 20a capacity circuit. The current drawn is determined by the load, it is not inherent in the outlet. Ever wonder a lamp often uses #22 zip cord that would melt in an instant if it was pulling a full 20amps? The intent is to have ample capacity at the outlet for the load being served. The opposite scenario would mean the circuit can not deliver enough power causing a voltage drop and overloading melting the wiring. These slow smoldering overloads cause more fires than a short circuit (fast current rise)overload. BTW, not all appliances have overload protection. How about your toaster?

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            • #36
              Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

              Originally posted by johncameron View Post
              His house may be grandfathered in as code.

              Plumber Punky; If you post the actual listing instructions to the appliance in question we can give you a definitive answer. In general the rating of an appliance is talking about the minimum ampacity of a circuit. If something is rated 20amp it needs to be plugged into a 20amp circuit Not a 15a. If the rating is 15a, there is nothing wrong with plugging it into an outlet with a 20a capacity circuit. The current drawn is determined by the load, it is not inherent in the outlet. Ever wonder a lamp often uses #22 zip cord that would melt in an instant if it was pulling a full 20amps? The intent is to have ample capacity at the outlet for the load being served. The opposite scenario would mean the circuit can not deliver enough power causing a voltage drop and overloading melting the wiring. These slow smoldering overloads cause more fires than a short circuit (fast current rise)overload. BTW, not all appliances have overload protection.

              Im not the OP. He had a question about an electric dryer.

              How about your toaster? An internal overload of some sort. We had one before, a single use type of thing. Once it blows up I figure we're due for another one. I try to make sure everything has some sort of protection internal or external.
              There's not a lot we can do about the lighting. We switched to fused low voltage where possible and LED elsewhere. We have too many lightning and other electrical issues to have to worry about crappy wiring problems.
              Last edited by Plumber Punky; 11-30-2013, 12:05 AM.
              ~~

              ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

                You seem to be unnecessarily paranoid about appliances. They have been tested by UL or a similar NRTL before being approved for market. If you want to add a supplemental fuse in your appliances thats fine with me, but the product is already intrinsically safe.

                BTW, The only protection in a toaster is when the tungsten wire in the element melts.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

                  perhaps, but what i do serves me well.

                  edit: it took me a bit to find this diagram - shows the fuse in my toaster - part #40.

                  http://www.ereplacementparts.com/del...48_122749.html
                  Last edited by Plumber Punky; 11-30-2013, 09:51 PM.
                  ~~

                  ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: Electric Clothes Dryer Breaker question

                    Nice find on your toaster fuse. I have seen many appliances without internal fusing. The design often does not have a fuse but instead uses a weak spot (such as solder joint) that will melt apart during an overload.

                    Again, If it is UL listed you have nothing to worry about plugging a 1amp radio into a 20amp receptacle.

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