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  • Electricity under the sink

    Hey everyone,

    I am looking to install a small hot water dispenser in my sink, but have a little problem - I do not have an outlet under my sink. I checked and my little dispenser draws a maximum of 4.3A. Can I simply tap the dishwasher circuit for the 4.3A or am I breaking some code? Right now my dishwasher is on a 15A breaker and the max current draw is 9.9A (I am sure this is when the heater and pump are both on).

    Also, I am curious what the consensus is on using t-tap splitting connectors, like the 3M Scotchlok series. These are an easy way to displace the insulation to pull current from the wiring I have behind my dishwasher. I think I know what the answer will be. but what do you think about these connectors?

    Thanks for all your help guys!

  • #2
    Re: Electricity under the sink

    I install instant hots and recirc pumps a lot under sinks. A licensed electrician usually charges me $185 or so for a GFI outlet right where I need it.

    David

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Electricity under the sink

      If you are not a licensed electrician I would recommend hiring one to do this job. If you are determined that you are competent as an engineer....don't know from your description if you are mechanical or electrical. Me, If the wire feeding your dishwasher is on a dedicated circuit and is 12-2 wg you may want to consider changing out your 15A breaker to 20A. Install a GFI receptical under your sink but do not use the 3M Scotchlok series because they do not recommend except on 19 to 26 AWG. Use the receptical to make your tap or receptical box so you have a fire proof connection and electrical protection around water.

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      • #4
        Re: Electricity under the sink

        An individual circuit is not required by NEC code unless it is specified in the manufactures instructions.
        A lockable disconnect is sometimes required at the panel.

        No, You can not add more than 2.6a to that outlet since a dishwasher is considered a continuous load.

        Have it upgraded to a 20 amp circuit and use only chapter 3 wiring methods (Don't use Scotchlock terminals as they are designed for small stranded wire)

        Best to hire a licensed Electrician. Another consideration is adding a garbage disposal.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Electricity under the sink

          Originally posted by johncameron View Post
          An individual circuit is not required by NEC code unless it is specified in the manufactures instructions.
          A lockable disconnect is sometimes required at the panel.

          No, You can not add more than 2.6a to that outlet since a dishwasher is considered a continuous load.

          Have it upgraded to a 20 amp circuit and use only chapter 3 wiring methods (Don't use Scotchlock terminals as they are designed for small stranded wire)

          Best to hire a licensed Electrician. Another consideration is adding a garbage disposal.
          I disagree. The NEC requires a separate individual circuit for all fastened in place appliances. The dishwasher is not allowed to share a breaker. Depending upon how the instant hot water heater is mounted, it will also require a separate circuit.

          Jeff

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Electricity under the sink

            Originally posted by piette View Post
            I disagree. The NEC requires a separate individual circuit for all fastened in place appliances. The dishwasher is not allowed to share a breaker. Depending upon how the instant hot water heater is mounted, it will also require a separate circuit.

            Jeff
            The NEC in 2008 stated:

            Protect branch circuit conductors against over current in accordance with 240.4, and provide over current protection for equipment based on the individual articles listed in 240.3 and Table 240.3.
            Outlet device rating

            A single receptacle must have an ampere rating of not less than the over current device protecting the branch circuit [210.21(B)(1)].

            If connected to a branch circuit that supplies two or more receptacles or outlets:

            The total cord- and plug-connected load must not exceed 80% of the receptacle rating [210.21(B)(2)].

            Equipment fastened in place, other than luminaires, must not be rated more than 50% of the branch circuit ampere rating " if this circuit also supplies luminaires, receptacle outlets, or both "[210.23(A)(2)],

            Unless the NEC has been modified to require a dedicated circuit for equipment fastened in place and you have 12-2wg conductors on a 20 amp breaker you could connect the dishwasher and the under the sink water heater. But the code could have been changed. The safest thing to do is hire a licensed electrician to run another dedicated circuit for the added water heater and pay attention to the instructions included with the new water heater.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Electricity under the sink

              Originally posted by piette View Post
              I disagree. The NEC requires a separate individual circuit for all fastened in place appliances. The dishwasher is not allowed to share a breaker. Depending upon how the instant hot water heater is mounted, it will also require a separate circuit.

              Jeff
              Can you cite a code reference to substantiate this?

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              • #8
                Re: Electricity under the sink

                Originally posted by johncameron View Post

                No, You can not add more than 2.6a to that outlet since a dishwasher is considered a continuous load.
                Seriously??? Who in their right mind would consider a residential DW a continuous load?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Electricity under the sink

                  Originally posted by piette View Post
                  The NEC requires a separate individual circuit for all fastened in place appliances.
                  Wow, the misinformation in this thread is staggering.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Electricity under the sink

                    Originally posted by Speedy Petey View Post
                    Seriously??? Who in their right mind would consider a residential DW a continuous load?
                    Average dishwasher runs for about 2 hours, some maybe 2 1/2 hours.
                    But yes, I agree its a bit short of the continuous definition of 3 hours.

                    Regardless, the 15 amp circuit was not adequate.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Electricity under the sink (Tap into garbage disposer circuit?)

                      Or do the disposer and dishwasher use the same circuit?
                      I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
                      It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
                      "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

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                      • #12
                        I would using the existing circuit to install a receptacle under the sink. Install an appliance cord on the DW and the water heater. Plug them both into the receptacle. Use GFCI if your code cycle requires it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'd install a duel outlet sink top air switch and plug the disposal and DW into it. With it's built in alternator you'll never have both appliances on at one time.
                          http://www.insinkerator.com/en-us/Do...h_brochure.pdf

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Plumbus View Post
                            I'd install a duel outlet sink top air switch and plug the disposal and DW into it. With it's built in alternator you'll never have both appliances on at one time.
                            http://www.insinkerator.com/en-us/Do...h_brochure.pdf
                            He has a DW and an instant water heater, not a disposer.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by rjniles View Post
                              I would using the existing circuit to install a receptacle under the sink. Install an appliance cord on the DW and the water heater. Plug them both into the receptacle. Use GFCI if your code cycle requires it.
                              I know of no code cycle that requires GFI protection for receptacles under a sink. Only commercial installations would require this.

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