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Need wiring help on old dryer motor.

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  • Need wiring help on old dryer motor.

    Well, it was so long ago that I pulled the motor (might be 15 to 20 years ago or longer) because it was still working and the dryer was being replaced with a new one.
    Well, either there was a sticker that fell off, or I was not thinking, but there is no ID on this motor and I can't find any.
    The guy at the appliance parts store said it was older than he was.
    It has 5 wires.
    Update.
    After more searching, I did remembering there were numbers on the connections and have them listed below.
    Line 1,3, and 4 are plain to see.
    Line 2 is showing enough to know for sure it is a 2.
    Line 5 has only a small part of the right side showing, but as there are 5 wires, it does look like it is a part of a 5.

    Line 2 is the Large white wire, I assume is neutral and hooked up as such.
    Line 3 is the Large black wire, I assume is 120 V and hooked up as such.
    They plug in ok with no scary noises, no smoke or fireworks, nad it does not turn over.

    These I am not sure about, but assume one should be the start winding and one should be the run winding and the white one is neutral, or ground?
    Line 1 is the Small white wire with black hash marks.
    Line 5 is the Small gray wire with black hash marks.
    Line 4 is the Small brown wire with black hash marks.

    The only ID of any sort is the "belt Pull" logo pictured below.
    I did see one id picture on line and it appears to be a type "R" motor, but that was all it said.

    Could it perhaps be a 120/240 motor depending on how the wires are connected?
    Attached Files
    Last edited by archangel2003; 04-19-2014, 04:15 PM.

  • #2
    Check inside the panel of the dryer. Typically there is a wiring schematic for the service tech. Sure its not a 2 speed motor.

    Rick
    phoebe it is

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by archangel2003 View Post
      Well, it was so long ago that I pulled the motor (might be 15 to 20 years ago or longer) because it was still working and the dryer was being replaced with a new one.
      That dryer panel has most likely been melted down, made in to something else, sold, worn out, and recycled again.

      Oh, the small white and the small brown wire have continuity.
      Here is the rubber mount identified by the part number.
      I thought it was a seal.

      Motor Mount, I.D.: 1-3/4", O.D: 2-1/2", Height: 3/8", Use Mount clamp#: WE 1004 EIS Part Number: WE 510 - RUBBER MOUNTING
      A.O. Smith UPC/Stock Number: 163A494 H04
      Manufacturer: A.O. Smith
      Last edited by archangel2003; 04-19-2014, 05:01 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        my guess would be that possibly two or three of the wires go to capacitors,
        this is just one of many possibilities depending on motor type and if it is one or two or three speed, http://neilorme.com/psc_motor.shtml

        or

        http://www.fixya.com/support/r775537...hase_capacitor



        and it is possible if it was out of a dryer (electric) it could even be a 240 volt motor, as most likely the element was 240 volt,

        here is one that shows 5 wires,
        http://what-when-how.com/electric-mo...lectric-motor/ Illustration,
        http://lh4.ggpht.com/_X6JnoL0U4BY/S1...jpg?imgmax=800

        I would have no idea if it is capacitor start and or run what values it would take,

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        If there is a motor rewinding shop in your area, you maybe could take down and ask them,
        (my guess is you would be better off to scrap it and go buy a new/used unit that runs and is the correct voltage RPM, and horse power for what you want to run),

        it is also possible that two of the wires were part of a over load system (heat or breaker activated).

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        if you know the aprox. year, and the maker of the dryer, it is a small possibility one could find a diagram or manual on the net,

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        here is a wiring diagram that shows extra wires connected to the start switch, (which most likely is the same as the start windings switch in most other single phase motors,

        http://www.appliancerepair.net/images/02-06.gif

        http://www.applianceaid.com/images/m...irediagram.JPG
        Last edited by BHD; 04-19-2014, 05:35 PM. Reason: found more stuff,
        Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
        attributed to Samuel Johnson
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

        Comment


        • #5
          I took it apart and it does have a centrifugally actuated switch mechanism on the shaft of one end.
          I took a bunch of pictures of the interior and there are thin windings and slightly thicker windings.
          Now it won't let me post with picture attachments!
          Last edited by archangel2003; 04-19-2014, 07:53 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Not enough info for me to say for sure. But, Brown wire usually goes to cap. Black is line, Larger white is neutral. Likely not a dual voltage motor. Sometimes the terminals have markings like "R" for run winding "S" for start winding or "C" for capacitor. Don't guess at wiring things, better to pitch it and buy another motor.

            Comment


            • #7
              The thing is I am not repairing a dryer, I am re-purposing an older, good motor so, I will not be purchasing a new one.
              Worst case, I would look for another old, used dryer that still turns over and just pull the motor and associated parts.
              With all the other “surplus” motors I have, if it has a capacitor, is either mounted on to, or next to the motor with a short wire so as to be obvious.
              I have watched a bunch of videos on both start and run capacitors, looked up wiring diagrams for various dryers that use a centrifugally actuated switch, and some have capacitors, but a lot of them don't.
              I would like to try and get it wired without a capacitor just to see if it will run well without them.

              Comment


              • #8
                I have the pictures uploaded to photobucket and it look like it should be simple enough for someone who knows what to do.

                http://s911.photobucket.com/user/arc...?sort=3&page=1

                The one thin winding seem to have more turns.
                The two thicker windings seem to have fewer turns.

                Line 1 goes to a small rectangle thing, then to the thin windings and does this by itself at all times and is not switched by speed.
                Line 2 and 3 touch at high speed only.
                Line 3 touches nothing at low speed but touches 2 at high speed.
                Line 4 goes to one thick winding at all times and at low speed to an additional winding.
                Line 5 touches 4 at high speed.
                Last edited by archangel2003; 04-20-2014, 02:13 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  What John Cameron said for wiring. You have a centrifugal start motor. I can only see thumbs on photo bucket but you can see the spring operated mechanism at the end of the shaft. It disengsges one set of windings once it reaches speed.

                  Talk to Jeff1 in the Appliance forum at handymanwire.com. if anyone can help, he can.
                  ~~

                  ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The cent switch and capacitor are in series with the start winding. The run winding is hooked to line voltage. Should be able to trace out what is what with an ohmmeter. What the heck are you building anyway?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The "start" windings will have more resistance (the smaller size wires in the windings) than the thicker and shorter "Run" windings

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I got it all figured out.
                        The first set of wires at low speed were the start windings.
                        Those dropped out and switched over to the run windings at high speed.
                        One wire that did nothing but was connected to both windings all the time was the neutral.
                        The extra 2 wires that switched in at high speed were for the dryer heating element.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          glad you got it figured out
                          Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                          "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                          attributed to Samuel Johnson
                          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                          PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                          Comment

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