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220v 40amp in garage for kiln. GFCI?

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  • 220v 40amp in garage for kiln. GFCI?

    Hello everybody. My daughter got a kiln. So I need to put in 220 volt outlet with at least 40 amps capacity in my garage. I know regular garage outlets in accessible places all need to be GFCI protected. But does my 220 volt receptacle need a GFCI breaker? What if I put the receptacle 6 ft off the ground? Any guidance would be very much appreciated as 220 volt GFCI breakers are way more expensive than non GFCI breakers. Of course, if it needs to be GFCI, then that is what I will do. Thanks!

  • #2
    Hi, not that much activity on here for electrical issues/questions. There are some electricians who may be able to answer your question, but it might be a while before one of them checks in and sees your post.

    One of the electrical forums might be a better place to pose your question. Mike Holts' site is a well known place. Here is one thread from that site related to your question:
    GFCI required in residential shop/garage/ outbuilding | Mike Holt's Forum

    If you check with an electrician licensed in your area they will be able to tell you what is required by code.

    Contractors: What you need to know about the 2020 National Electrical Code (se.com)
    Last edited by Bob D.; 03-06-2021, 10:49 AM.
    "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006
    "?ǝɹɐ sɹǝƃuıɟ ɹnoʎ ǝɹǝɥʍ ʍouʞ noʎ op `ʍɐs ǝlqɐʇ ɐ s,ʇı"

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    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1p...qcZKHyrqKhikFA

    ----

    Comment


    • #3
      Florida is on NEC 2017 and does not require GFCI on 240 volt circuits.

      Comment


      • #4
        I am not a licensed electrician, but I've done a number of wiring projects over the years. MY understanding is that ANYWHERE, there is a bare concrete, gravel, or dirt floor, yard space, or wherever there is possible contact with 'ground' (that includes metal in any form that may be standing or connected to 'ground', you would want to have a GFCI breaker! You don't want to be standing or in anyway have contact with flooring (or anything else) that has the potential of 'grounding' a person on contact. Even with precautions, there is always the potential of a body offering an electrical pathway to 'ground'! (pulling the plug, touching poorly wired or defective circuit on the cabinet, etc.)

        Again, I'm NOT an electrician, and my NEC manual is too old to quote from, but you might also want to ensure that the kiln is UL and/or SA approved and that it is properly grounded too.

        I had a new service put to my garage a few years ago, standard circuit breaker panel, licensed electrician installed and inspected to meet NEC Code. The outlets in the garage are GFCI. The basement laundry room with the washer and dryer are also on GFCI circuits, as is the outside outlets on the deck and porch.

        Years ago, when our son was just a little guy, I build a large model railroad layout in our basement. I made a control box for the rail switches, lighting, etc. All that was powered by a small voltage transformer and I thought I had wired everything pretty safely. But one day when we were playing my little guy (about four or five at the time), touched the head of one of the switch mounting bolts (like a 10-32), and got one heckuva shock. The basement was a concrete floor and he was just wearing socks. Apparently the transformer I used was improperly wired and conducted power to the surrounding mounting bracket.

        Knowing how people are, especially doing something they love, you certainly don't want something like that to happen with higher voltage and amperage. Use a GFCI breaker!

        CWS

        Comment


        • Bob D.
          Bob D. commented
          Editing a comment
          But the Q is about a 240v receptacle, not 120v. Do you have any 240v circuits in your garage? The new version of the NEC does talk about GFI protection for EVSE (electric vehicle service equipment) or EV Chargers, but a kiln is not that.

          For me if I had to add GFI protection to all the circuits in my detached garage I would into just dropping in one 60A 2pole GFI breaker in the main panel in the house that feeds the sub panel in the garage and be done with it. But that is probably not going to work here.

        • CWSmith
          CWSmith commented
          Editing a comment
          I understand, but regardless of 120 or 240, is the danger still not there?

          I have a full panel, 100 amp that services my garage and my workshop shed. While at present there are only 120 outlets, there is 240 capability. The current outlets are on a GFCI circuit. If I was to have something like a kiln, my thought would be to have it on a GFCI breaker. Is that problematic?

          The concern is that anytime a body can provide a link to ground, as with being in contact with a bare concrete floor, there is risk, is there not?

          CWS

      • #5
        To expand on what I answered in post #3, all 120 volt circuits in a garage require GFCI. This includes receptacles for refrigerators or freezers. NEC 2017 and earlier versions do not require GFCI for 240 volt circuits. The change for NEC 2020 is that GFCI will be required for 240 volt circuits.

        Comment


        • #6
          I understand, but I guess my question at this point would be, "Why was 220 Volts NOT required for GFCI, when 120 Volts are? Perhaps a lack of education on my part, and I'm missing something here, but seems that if the lower voltage has the requirement, then the higher voltage should have also. (Yes, I know about the amperage being halved as the Voltage is doubled, but the current would still be lethal should a person find themselves the easiest path to 'ground'. (again, I'm NOT an electrician)

          CWS
          Last edited by CWSmith; 03-07-2021, 08:03 PM. Reason: spelling error

          Comment


          • #7
            Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
            I understand, but I guess my question at this point would be, "Why was 220 Volts NOT required for GFCI, when 120 Volts are? Perhaps a lack of education on my part, and I'm missing something here, but seems that if the lower voltage has the requirement, then the higher voltage should have also. (Yes, I know about the amperage being halved as the Voltage is doubled, but the current would still be lethal should a person find themselves the easiest path to 'ground'. (again, I'm NOT an electrician)

            CWS
            You have to ask that question of the people who write the code. Code requirements have gotten stiffer with each new edition of the NEC. You are always free to add GFCI protection over and above the code requirements. May people choose not to as 2 pole GFCI breakers are quite expensive. FYI, it is 240 not 220 volts

            Comment


            • CWSmith
              CWSmith commented
              Editing a comment
              "FYI, it is 240 not 220 volts"

              YES, of course I know that... just a slip on my part., sorry! I grew up in a time when people around me referred to it as 110 volts or 220 volts, then it was "115 volts" and then "120" and "240". Perhaps it was just a regional thing, I don't know. In any case I do understand it's 120 volts or 240 volts. Once in a while I might still slip and say, "Over yonder" too.

              CWS
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