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  • Working on a workshop in my house....

    Working on a workshop in my house, and i need to know how to get outlets put in right. I have heard you need conduit and if that is true how should it be done?
    If the women don't find ya Handsome they should at least find ya Handy.

  • #2
    posting a pic of the area would help us answer that question. Need to know the wall type (studded, poured, block, drywall, unfinished).
    In general I don't think you need to run conduit unless it is required by code in your particular area (can be asked at the permit office)
    If you are running wire on the surface (ie not through studs) you can use BX or armor cable

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Handy Andy
      Working on a workshop in my house, and i need to know how to get outlets put in right. I have heard you need conduit and if that is true how should it be done?
      Andy, this is a very very general question. There are many details to putting in outlets correctly. As Brooks said, a picture would be good. Tell us what you know, and perhaps we can build on that.

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      • #4
        One hint on where to put outlets is to install them at least 52" above the floor. By doing that, you won't have to worry about sheet goods or other obstacles being in the way when you want to use one.
        Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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        • #5
          Workshop Outlets

          Andy,
          A pix or description of area would definitely help. Don't forget, if it is garage, basement, concrete floor, wet location, GFCI protection is required for all the outlets you install.
          Jim D.

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          • #6
            i can't post a picture of it but it is a 14' by 15' unfinished room and the walls are all cement. I have a door going outside in the southeast corner and the southwest corner has a stud wall with the panel in it. Just wonder what steps i need to take to put outlets at 52" along the walls. I don't want to have bare wire were it can get damaged.
            If the women don't find ya Handsome they should at least find ya Handy.

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            • #7
              Since your panel is already in one corner you should be able to add another 20 amp breaker for your workshop. Your first outlet should be a gfci, and from the load of the gfci run power to the other outlets. And 52" is a great idea since you don't want to reach behind your tools or materials to unplug something.

              Get:
              an anchoring kit,
              Attachment
              3/8" 1 hole straps,
              flex connectors,
              at lest a 100' roll of BX or AC cable (flex)
              and you probable won't need more than 3-4 outlets, so get 3-4 handy box's. and 2-3 metal duplex covers.
              You could also use a 4x4x1 1/4 box with a combination cover for the duplex and the gfci outlets.
              Some ground screws will be needed to attach the box's to the ground wire (green or bare copper wire). If you don't want to buy a whole box then you can just use a #10 screw and color it green. In the back of all the boxes there is a place for a ground screw.
              A few wire nuts will also be handy when connecting all the ground wire.

              If you are not comfortable working on this yourself get a professional electrician. Even I Won't stick my hands in a live panel.
              Attached Files
              "Diplomacy is saying nice dodging until you can find a rock." Will Rogers
              "If a Monkey can do your job, are you in the right profession?

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              • #8
                So tell me if i am right. Your black red and blue are "hot", the white or gray is a neutral, and the green or bare is a ground? I don't need to get a breaker since there is one un-used in the panel. I know how to do outlets and anchor things to concrete but what else should i know before i decide to do this myself?

                Can you give me an idea on what it would cost for a professional to do this vs me getting the parts and doing it myself?
                Last edited by Handy Andy; 05-06-2006, 12:33 AM.
                If the women don't find ya Handsome they should at least find ya Handy.

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                • #9
                  Not sure about cost but you should run 12/2 wire even on a 15A breaker. Since most woodworking tools draw a bunch of power the 12/2 will reduce voltage drop in the line. Also you should only have black/white/bare in BX. Never seen a blue wire other than in a ceiling fan fixture and yes it is hot. Red/Black also hot but mostly found in 3 wire or baseboard heater cable (red sheath)
                  Last edited by wbrooks; 05-06-2006, 01:00 AM.

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