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  • Please help a beginner

    I'm a beginner at this trade, but would like anyone to give me any tips on
    CAT 6 wiring, new tools, residental wiring to industrial wiring. I would also like to have help in any thing else on the subject of any type electrical power installation in any category. Thank you

  • #2
    What work are you going to do right now, or are you wondering which area is better?

    I haven't done industrial work but a combination of residential and commercial is fun. (at least to me.) As for low voltage stuff i don't do much of that aside from phone and TV jacks. If you are going to school at the same time and are in the union program then you have 5 years and the 5Th year they teach you low voltage wiring.

    For tools, all your hand tools should really be Klein or Crescent. I have bought other cheaper brands and it just didn't cut it.

    some people say to have your basic hand tools, which is a few screwdrivers and nut drivers of different sizes, a hammer (smooth faced not milled) Lineman's, needle nose, & diagonal cut pliers. Wire strippers that will handle 16 to 10 AWG and not the kind that comes with an assortment of crimps. Plug/gfci tester, a voltage tester and the sense to use them. Some "chanellocks", and a good level. a tape measure ( I prefer the Stanley "fat max") And a comfortable tool belt. Your employer should provide you with pencils and sharpies.

    If you are only doing residential you'll need your basic hand tools, a cordless drill (I don't use anything less than 12v but I am also looking at the 9.6v Ridgid.) or even better a 4pc power tool set, a flashlight and some band aids

    For commercial it is sometimes preferred that you have your own 1/2" and 3/4" conduit benders. You will also need your basic hand tools, durable gloves (conduit can both burn or freeze your hands!) A power tool set would be nice to have but keep your eye on it. On a larger job your tools may take a "walk", when you aren't watching.

    I have never been on a large industrial job but it should be a lot like heavy commercial work.
    Last edited by Polar Sparky 1224; 05-12-2006, 09:39 PM.
    "Diplomacy is saying nice dodging until you can find a rock." Will Rogers
    "If a Monkey can do your job, are you in the right profession?

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    • #3
      Thank You

      thank you polar sparky. I am not really sure what type of electrical i'm going into, but for the time being I am taking a technical school shop class and its called Industrial Tech./Maintenence. I'm studying everything I like which includes: HVAC, Plumbing, Carpentry, Robotics, Motor Control, Residential to Commercial to Industrial Wiring, Welding, and just about anything that includes the building and maintenence trades. I would still like to get any helpful info anyone can give me. Right now I'm getting my hours in to being a master electrician and then going on to be certified in all the trades. Our shop has included all these trades because of our expenses and the political war that is going on in our county. Thank you and please help with any tips

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      • #4
        Industrial is a whole different animal, compared to the others. I have worked in all other areas, but I prefer the industrial side. I like running 4" rigid and terminating parallel 750MCM. IMO there is an art form to running big pipes and making them look nice.

        You also need to know instrumentation and programming.

        I've been doing strictly industrial for the past 6 years and I wouldn't change a thing.

        Just my 2 cents.

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        • #5
          I am not a proffesional electrician, but I am. I am not liscensed or certified and can only work from the disconnect out. I learned home electrical back in the 70s when I bought my house and although I am not up on all the codes and regulations, I always do it right. My proffesion is an industrial mechanic on overhead cranes and hoists. 90% of my work is with 3 phase industrial power, 230-575 volts. I design, build and install control panels and crane systems all the time. I cannot run power from a main buss or panel by law, but can run it from a disconnect installed for my system. I guess the laws allow my work because I am building, installing an end user device not an electrical system. If you have any specific questions along my line, I will be happy to help in any way I can. I agree with PS about the quality tools of Klien, Cresent, Channelock, but will add Greenlee as another good brand for drilling/knockout type tools.
          info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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          • #6
            Originally posted by NDMaster
            Industrial is a whole different animal, compared to the others. I have worked in all other areas, but I prefer the industrial side. I like running 4" rigid and terminating parallel 750MCM. IMO there is an art form to running big pipes and making them look nice.
            Getting offsets straight in 4" pipe with a Chicago style or other electric bender is an art in itself.
            But then don't you use pre made 90's?
            "Diplomacy is saying nice dodging until you can find a rock." Will Rogers
            "If a Monkey can do your job, are you in the right profession?

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            • #7
              Polar, we bend everything, including 90's. Pre-made 90's have almost too tight a radius. If you have a run with 3 90's, and they are bent rather than pre-made, it is a much easier pull.

              We use a Greenlee 884 bender, it's a one shot bender. Much easier to use then a segment bender.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by nsmathis@charter.net
                I'm a beginner at this trade, but would like anyone to give me any tips on
                CAT 6 wiring, new tools, residental wiring to industrial wiring. I would also like to have help in any thing else on the subject of any type electrical power installation in any category. Thank you
                You need to do a little web surfing and it will definitely shorten your learning curve, as far as what you need (or can afford). I'll post a few good sites that you can dig around on.

                I you are going to be doing low voltage voice or data lines you will need a good puchdown tool. And tracing tools such as a toner/inductive probe set.

                FlukeNetworks recently bought out Harris tools. They've been the standard of the telephone industry for 50 years or so. Everything they make is top drawer stuff.
                For the toner/probe Tempo (part of the Textron Corp) along with the Greenlee brand make excellent tools.

                Ideal Industries make good stuff, although it is expensive.
                Graybar has a fair set of manufacturer links on this page, just filter what you want to see at the top, and it will pull up all the available links to that tool.

                Since you are just starting out - here is the tip of the day:

                Buy the best tools you can and there's a good chance you'll never have to buy that tool again. Also, make sure you engrave your tools or put YOUR identifying mark on your tools. It's funny watching a half dozen men try to figure out whose scrwedriver or lineman's plier or <insert common tool name here> is whose.
                <funny true story about this - seems once about 4 guys were farting around after lunch and they started tossing their #2 Kleins at an antbed just to see who could get an ant; pretty soon lunch time was over, and the argument over who's got who's screwdriver stayed hot the rest of the afternoon.> fun stuff.

                Example: Buy Klein tools, not Taiwan/Chinese
                Good luck on your new career.
                Phil
                Tools Rule

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