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  • Amazing Electricity Video

    Some of you may have seen this already. I think its a relay station shutting off its main switch. Seems appropriate for the Electricians forum.

    http://www.ridgid.com/josh/lugo_swr.mpg

    its 1.5 megs.

    Josh

  • #2
    Thats cool, all 3 phases open at the same time, wonder why only the first phase arcs like that??

    Comment


    • #3
      Is there a hot neutral and ground? Maybe the hot is the one arching.

      I wonder if you could smell some ozone there after it was done?

      Josh

      Comment


      • #4
        Many years ago (1977), I went to work at a nuke plant and was parked next to the switchyard waiting to go into work at 7AM. I had arrived early as it was a long trip and was sitting in the truck finishing a cup of coffee. I dozed off and was abruptly woken up by the sound of the switches being opened and the resulting arc flash in the switchyard less than 100 feet away. It was still dark out (6:30AM) and the eerie blue light from the arc and the noise was scary as hell. I have never had to do any work in the switchyard at facilities such as this but I have never forgotten that experience. Its pretty amazing to see the video, its even more exciting closeup when you are half awake.
        ---------------
        Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
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        “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
        ---------
        "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
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        sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          Back in the 70's and 80's, my plant used to make very high pressure compressor packages that were used to cool the relays and (as I was told anyway) "blow the arc out". These packages usually consisted of twin three- or four-stage Type 30 compressors which loaded two "bottles" to around 2,000 psi. The bottles were about 28-inches in diameter and appox. 16 ft long and were mounted between the steel support legs which held the two compressor cabinets. Total structure was about 8 ft high x 16ft or so.

          Initially these units were supplied to the TVA (Tennesse Valley Authority), but the market was expanded after that.

          The objective was to distinguish relay arcing that often caused the relays to fail (weld or break) and thus cause brown-outs.

          CWS

          Comment


          • #6
            More Cool High Voltage Stuff...

            HERE!










            I just love this stuff!
            Phil
            Tools Rule

            Comment


            • #7
              yup i'm a wus .... i would have to quit after seeing that.and change my underware
              9/11/01, never forget.

              Comment


              • #8
                Phil G. thanks for the link. That site is incredible. I have a new background on my desktop now.



                Josh

                Comment


                • #9
                  High Voltage Fun And Games

                  In the summer of 1972, we had straight line winds go through our city knocking down trees and power lines all over the place. That night, one substation on the other end of town (about 2 miles from our house) blew up due to the overloads it was handling. We watched that thing go up in the sky from our location and then had to drive out there to make sure that what we had just seen really had happened. It had.

                  On another note, linemen know that "only a lineman can rescue another lineman" who is working on a high voltage installation. EMTs and paramedics won't and shouldn't go near the place. They hold a school out West (Ropes that Rescue) to teach linemen how to rescue each other. Those high voltage lines can create an arc that will extend out as far as 13 feet in order to reach out and grab a person walking within that fatal arc zone. Hence the fence with the "danger high voltage" signs at sub stations.

                  If you ever get a chance to watch the Discovery channel show on high voltage linemen, see it. It's worth the time. Especially the part where the linemen are in the helicopters. They wear a chain mail suit and both the helicopter and the linemen "bond onto" the high voltage lines and work on those lines while they're still live. That and the footage of the linemen who worked on the power lines in California after a big earthquake. They were on the towers restoring power with aftershocks occurring. They kept on trucking to get the job done. Now those are guys with kahonas so big they must wheel them around with a dog goned wheelbarrow.
                  Me? I'd be smellin' somethin and lookin' for a new pair of dungarees.
                  Jim Don

                  BTW Don't try any of that stuff at home kiddies. It's a certain ride in the back of a hearse!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    So that's why the guys that work for the power company make better money than a regular electrician.

                    last year lightning struck a power line and i was in the back yard 200 yards from the pole and felt a bit of a shock wave. Unfortunately it dropped power lines right on someone's home and burnt it to the ground. lucky for them no one was home at the time.
                    If the women don't find ya Handsome they should at least find ya Handy.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Josh
                      Phil G. thanks for the link. That site is incredible. I have a new background on my desktop now.



                      Josh

                      josh i know you had the power to fined out what PLUMBER was up to.

                      did he get the mole
                      Charlie

                      My seek the peek fundraiser page
                      http://observatory.mountwashington.o...nal&fr_id=1040


                      http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.php

                      new work pictures 12/09
                      http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Josh
                        Phil G. thanks for the link. That site is incredible. I have a new background on my desktop now.



                        Josh
                        That's awesome, Josh.
                        I doubt if Darren Peter Oswald (X-Files 3rd season episode "DPO" played by Giovanni Ribisi was a teenager who could control lightening after being struck by it several times) could even stand that much lightening.
                        You're right, that photo would make an awesome background.
                        Phil
                        Tools Rule

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The switch in the original video is actually a combination of an interuppter housed in the horizontal grey porcelin (on the right) combined with an aluminum blade switch (on the left).
                          If you take your cursor and drag the video along in slow motion, you'll see that the arc actually starts across the porcelin interupter. A second arc starts at the swtich blade as it opens, and they combine as they rise. Unless it was artificially rigged as a test (hence the presence of the camera), the interupter failed first.

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                          • #14
                            That was some amazing stuff. Thanks for the link.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by WFO
                              The switch in the original video is actually a combination of an interuppter housed in the horizontal grey porcelin (on the right) combined with an aluminum blade switch (on the left).
                              If you take your cursor and drag the video along in slow motion, you'll see that the arc actually starts across the porcelin interupter. A second arc starts at the swtich blade as it opens, and they combine as they rise. Unless it was artificially rigged as a test (hence the presence of the camera), the interupter failed first.
                              Actually if you go to the link provided by PhilG. There is a write up about how this was a test that they preformed after having problems disconnecting a line reactor.

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