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  • Which puts out more light?

    A 500W quartz halogen vs 150W high pressure sodium. Also, what about bulb life and replacement cost?

  • #2
    rose from my undersatnding the 150 high pressure sodium will put out more light, last longer, cost lots more to purchase. it will save you money in the long run, but the upfront cost are much higher.

    the light color from quartz is much whiter.

    get some answers from the real pros.

    rick.
    phoebe it is

    Comment


    • #3
      The lumen output of a 500 quartz is right around 10,500. The HPS is around 14,000 lumens and is much more efficient, but the color of the light is not effective because of it's red/orange color.

      A 150W metal halide output is right around the same as the HPS, but the color is towards the blue/green end of the spectrum. The light is much more effective in color rendering.

      Side by side, the MH will look brighter than the HPS.

      Prices should be pretty close between the MH and the HPS, as long as you don't get any bells and whistles, like pulse start or special position bulbs.

      IMO go with the MH, you will be pleased with the results.

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      • #4
        I found 150W HPS compact fixtures @ Lowes for around $60 w/ bulb. Are MH's close to the same price? What about warm-up times?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK
          rose from my undersatnding the 150 high pressure sodium will put out more light, last longer, cost lots more to purchase. it will save you money in the long run, but the upfront cost are much higher.

          the light color from quartz is much whiter.

          get some answers from the real pros.

          rick.
          i knew someone would have a real answer.

          i too like the light of the metal halide. most of those freeway construction lights are metal halide. bright and white/blue.

          rick.
          phoebe it is

          Comment


          • #6
            I can't answer the question other than by observation... knowing that the "sodium" bulbs are lower on the color spectrum and appear more orange as compared to the quartz halogen lamps or metal halide bulbs.

            I can however speak with regard to color temperature (rather important from a color rendering point of view).

            Color temperature values are based on a standard where 5,000 Kelvin is basically the temperture of natural sunlight at the base of the Washington Monument at 12:00 Noon on July 4th. (No kidding!) Don't know when and how they arrived at that, but surely it was on a clear day with no smog.

            So, values on lighting, in addition to lumens (brightness), is often provided with color temperature values in Kelvin. The lower the temperature, the more red/orange and the higher the temperature, the more blue.

            Quartz Halogen lamps have a temperature in the range of 3,600 Kelvin and "Sodium Bulbs", I believe, are less than 1,800 K. Quartz "Flash" tubes which are used in photography are color corrected to be as close to "daylight" (5,000 K) as possible. While standard florescents are available in many "colors", you can buy color corrected flourescents that are close to "daylight". Tungsten filament bulbs (incandescents), as I recall are around 2,000 - 2,400 K, but I probably should look that up. Most all bulbs (Tungsten, quartz, florescent, etc.) change color over time, usually going toward the red/orange as they age. If you need to see colors correctly, that's important, bu if you're simply lighting up the yard, it probably doesn't matter much.

            The bottom line is really that brightness (lumens) and color value (light temperature in Kelvin) are different values. Generally speaking, a very bright (higher lumens) bulb with a lower temperature will not appear as bright as a higher temperature bulb with the same lumen value. I am under the impression however, that lower temperature bulbs require less power, and last longer, hence the growing trend toward high pressure sodium in commercial lighting such as warehouses, parking lots, and street lighting. But, in commercial retail applications, where customers need to see better color values, lighting with a higher color temperature is a must.

            A bit long and probably more than you wanted to know,

            CWS

            Comment


            • #7
              CWS,

              Thanks for the detailed response. How long are the warm-up times w/ MH & HPS?

              I maybe better off w/ a $20 quartz halogen fixture & it's $3 bulbs, since I only turn it on a few times/week x 30-60 min.

              G S.

              Comment


              • #8
                Rose,

                I'm not familiar enough with Metal Halide or High Pressure Sodium lighting to answer that question. My only familiarity with the MH lights is that they are popular for use with aquariums because they enhance the color of the tropical fish. With HPS, the company I retired from, used them in our shops and the machinists hated them. They saved the factory a bundle because of their lower wattage, but the orange light seems to dull everything, as compared to the older, much whiter, but grossly more expensive lighting system.

                So, I may be wrong but I don't recall any significant warming up period with the new HPS shop lights. With quartz halogen lamps, they're instant. (They're used in most every automobile headlight. They do produce a substantial amount of heat though (Quartz Halogen) and you have to be careful when changing bulbs that you do not touch the glass with your bare fingers. (Touching the glass may contaminate the glass with skin oils, etc., and because of the extremely high heat, the glass will heat unevenly and could very well shatter.

                I hope this helps,

                CWS

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