Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Wiring for 230V - One room with breaker box

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Wiring for 230V - One room with breaker box

    Ok. I'm a fairly handy person who grew up on the farm and did nearly everything ourselves on the farm. Good or bad, it worked out well. At this time, I am upgrading a woodworking shop to a dust collector that requires 230V. I'm building the cyclone dust collection system and have a 3HP motor that says Frame:56, Voltage: 230, Phase: Single, RPM 3600.

    The room my shop is in has the breaker box, so that should make the installation easier, but my question is how much does it generally cost for an electrician to run a 320 outlet out 10 feet from a breaker box? Is this a simple $50 service call or is it more?

    I've run a fair amount of 110v wiring in home remodels etc, including three way and four way switches. I've not explored wiring 230 and don't quite know what it's all about. Can someone tell me what there is to know about what makes 230 different?

    Thanks for your interest in this post. Regards, Justin

  • #2
    I doubt someone would get in their truck and drive to your house for less than $100 plus material, I sure wouldn't.
    240 is achieved by using both hot wires from your panel. Either hot to neutral is 120V but the two hots are 180° out of phase so they add to 240. Breaker panels are designed so that when you add a dual breaker (required for 240) each pole will be attached to a different hot. If the breaker happened to have both poles attached to the same hot then you would actually have 0 volts across the breaker but 120V from each pole to ground. You use the same 14/2 (15A) or 12/2 (20A) wire as you would for 120v except the white wire goes to the breaker instead of the neutral buss, ground and black are the same. Make sure the dual breaker has the actuators tied together. On the plug you have 2 hots and a ground connection, it does not matter which hot goes to what side of the plug like it does for 120V plugs

    Comment


    • #3
      Good comments - thank you

      Wayne - Thank you for your insight. Much appreicated.

      Comment


      • #4
        Please also remember to wrap the white with red tape to indicate that it is a hot and not a neutral, at both the breaker and the outlet.
        Only a surfer knows the feeling. Billabong ca. 1985 or so

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Roadrunner
          Please also remember to wrap the white with red tape to indicate that it is a hot and not a neutral, at both the breaker and the outlet.
          I would think that any electrician would know just by looking at it without tape.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by swoosh81
            I would think that any electrician would know just by looking at it without tape.
            In the panel but not in the outlet. The tape will identify it for anyone else but the installer.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by swoosh81
              I would think that any electrician would know just by looking at it without tape.
              While that is true (with a few exceptions in commercial wiring), the some homeowners think the white is hot anyway. In a residential job of any kind, expect the person to change anything you've done, to be an idiot.

              Just had to redo the wiring someone hired a "handyman" to do for their covered patio. So in this case we arrived after the idiot left.
              everything was ran in 12/2, no stables were used, and he drilled hole in the brick wall and from there ran it up to the top of the wall in schedule 40 PVC and then stubbed in only to run his wires to a junction box and then back down to his switch's. he used 30 feet of wire when only 10 was needed.

              How this relates to this thread,,, usually the simplest way to do something is the best. Don't leave someone else with a mess to figure out.
              "Diplomacy is saying nice dodging until you can find a rock." Will Rogers
              "If a Monkey can do your job, are you in the right profession?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Someguy
                In the panel but not in the outlet. The tape will identify it for anyone else but the installer.
                In the panel it will be going to the breaker so I hope whoever would open it up would be smart enough to know that. If there not they have no business taking the cover off.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by swoosh81
                  In the panel it will be going to the breaker so I hope whoever would open it up would be smart enough to know that. If they're not, they have no business taking the cover off.
                  While it is true idiots have no business opening a panel, you can't be there to slap their hand for trying. I've been taught that if you use the neutral (white) for a hot, then you should label it as such on both ends. but stupid people can still screw it up. We had wire pulled to all our pole lights at the Costco. the sprinkler guys hit the conduit with their trencher and also removed the tape we had labeling which of the 4 larger wires was the neutral and which phase the others were on. It just takes to long to correct others mistakes.
                  "Diplomacy is saying nice dodging until you can find a rock." Will Rogers
                  "If a Monkey can do your job, are you in the right profession?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Polar Sparky 1224
                    While it is true idiots have no business opening a panel, you can't be there to slap their hand for trying. I've been taught that if you use the neutral (white) for a hot, then you should label it as such on both ends. but stupid people can still screw it up.
                    Yes it is very common to tape the white wire for when you wire lights hot to use the white wire to the switch as a hot wire but that is 110. As for idiots as you state opening up a panel that could possibly be the reason almost every fire (at least in Pa.)that occurs is linked back to an electrical malfunction.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by swoosh81
                      Yes it is very common to tape the white wire for when you wire lights hot...
                      It deserves mention that this is not an optional practice, it's required by the NEC. 200.7(C)(2).

                      FWIW, I agree that it should be done away with. Someone who doesn't understand what the conductor is being used for by looking at it should not be playing with the wiring. But code is code.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'm not an electrician, so thanks for the vindication RMS. I think the point is that white is always supposed to be the neutral, correct, and experienced or not, I think wrapping the tape is there as a double check and a redundancy flag to make sure someone knows that the wire is definitely not neutral. Now that begs the point, does anyone know why the code requires white as hot wrappped, especially if its in a breaker?
                        Last edited by Roadrunner; 08-06-2006, 07:38 PM.
                        Only a surfer knows the feeling. Billabong ca. 1985 or so

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Code requires it to be colored. Wrapped is a way to make the white colored. A hot conductor cannot be white, ever. You could paint it, but tape is easier. Sometimes it works the other way. We will use a black wire as a common. In that case, we wrap the black conductor with white tape at both ends.

                          And roadrunner, My first new car, bought it after HS graduation, was a '69 roadrunner.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Roadrunner
                            Now that begs the point, does anyone know why the code requires white as hot wrappped, especially if its in a breaker?
                            White or gray is reserved for the grounded conductor period.

                            Its sole job in the electrical system is to provide a path back to the source for the unbalanced return current. That's why it is required to be coded as an ungrounded conductor if it is landed on a breaker as in this case or as part as a switch loop. We generally use white for low voltage situations ie 120/208v systems and gray on high voltage 277/480 systems. For the non electricians the reference in the code is article 200.6 Means of identifying grounded conductors, if you are interested in looking it up.

                            Would I know what it was if it wasn't marked properly, yes, but that's not the point it only takes a minute to do it right and makes the installation look professional. I guess that is my pet peeve in this trade, coming behind someone who doesn't care and just slops the installation in and leaves it for the next guy to either fix or try to figure out what he intended.

                            Tom
                            Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X