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dedicated TS circuit?

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  • dedicated TS circuit?

    I was planning on getting my garage insulated before the cold weather hits, and was wondering if I should run a 20 A dedicated circuit for my TS3650. Right now its running on a 15 A breaker, and its not dedicated - it also runs the lights in my garage. I have never had a problem with flickering lights or tripped breakers. Should I follow "if it ain't broke don't fix it", or should I install the a new 20 A cicruit? (which I haver never done, but have researched and am quite confident I can do it)

  • #2
    Check the wiring - if it's 12awg you can replace the breaker with a 20amp.

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    • #3
      I would run the dediacted line. The main reason would be to get the saw off of the same circuit as the lights. It would be scary to be plunged into darknes if you trip a breaker with saw running.
      SSG, U.S. Army
      Retired
      K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

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      • #4
        I would run a 20A circuit at a minimum. Since you are insulating you should plan for the future as well. What about a dust collector circuit. How about that future jointer and planer? The best answer is to run a pony panel. Use a 40A breaker and feed the garage panel with 6 AWG. Then run a few circuits with multiple plugs. Don't forget the plug in the ceiling for the GDO and another for the air cleaner. I would also run another lighting circuit so you have 2 separate sources for light

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        • #5
          I'm pretty sure the wire is 14/2. How can I tell if its 12 AWG?

          My garage in only small and I don't know how long I will live in this house. My garage/shop is only 9 feet x 20 feet. Its VERY well organized, but I don't think it will be my last shop. Not sure if I want to sink a lot of cash into installing a sub-panel and running all new outlets and wiring. I was thinking I would run two 20 amp circuits from the basement panel (at least 1/3 of the panel is available and the basement is unfinished so I can run wire without too much trouble). One circuit would be a dedicated power tool circuit (TS, Router, CMS, etc) with two receptacles and the other would be for a 1500 watt space heater mounted to the wall near the ceiling. Everythng else (lights, smaller power tools like DP, sanders, etc) can run off the same 15 amp circuits already in place.

          What kind of amperage do a planers, DCs, and jointers require?

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          • #6
            If you have a sheathing stripper, most of those have wire gauges in the handle. Wire size must be determined to know whether its 12 or 14.
            there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by franklin pug
              I'm pretty sure the wire is 14/2. How can I tell if its 12 AWG?

              My garage in only small and I don't know how long I will live in this house. My garage/shop is only 9 feet x 20 feet. Its VERY well organized, but I don't think it will be my last shop. Not sure if I want to sink a lot of cash into installing a sub-panel and running all new outlets and wiring. I was thinking I would run two 20 amp circuits from the basement panel (at least 1/3 of the panel is available and the basement is unfinished so I can run wire without too much trouble). One circuit would be a dedicated power tool circuit (TS, Router, CMS, etc) with two receptacles and the other would be for a 1500 watt space heater mounted to the wall near the ceiling. Everythng else (lights, smaller power tools like DP, sanders, etc) can run off the same 15 amp circuits already in place.

              What kind of amperage do a planers, DCs, and jointers require?
              Your plan sounds good to me. As long as everything is 120v and your running one tool at a time a 20a circuit should be fine. As for your other question. There should be a plate on each tool listing the amperage either as amps or watts. If its in watts

              Watts
              ------ = Va
              Volts


              for example 1500w/120v= 12.5va
              Last edited by Mike Sparks; 09-14-2006, 08:08 PM.

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              • #8
                You can save time and wire (copper costs a lot these days) by running a 12/3 NM line, from which you could derive two seperate 20 amp circuits from running one line. Just put some black tape around the red lead at each end.

                I just ran a new circuit to my basement for my TS3650. Only, instead of 110v, I converted to 220, ran a single line of 12/2 for 20 amp service, and was able to run my DC and my TS on the same line. at 220 volts, it uses 1/2 the amps as if it was 110.

                Please, no flames, I am not an electrician. HTH

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