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  • AFCI vs GFCI

    I want to add a few new circuits to my garage. Should I install GFCI or AFCI? Is on better than the other?

    Also, does an electricians tourque wrench exist for ensuring proper connections?

  • #2
    AFCI and GFCI do different things. Neither is necessarily better. in your garage GFCI is required by code. It's supposed to keep you from electrocuting yourself. AFCI is supposed to keep your house from burning itself down.

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    • #3
      drivers

      there are torque limiting screw drivers available
      ex. snap-on QDRIVER4 adjustable torque screwdriver
      http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/item....store&tool=all
      there are others available

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      • #4
        Yes,
        GFCI belong in the kitchen, bathroom, and the garage according to code. The technology for AFCI is still developing, as they are used primarily in the bedrooms. Of course, if you place your garage refrigerator on a GFCI circuit, then you might end up with spoiled food...

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        • #5
          As the others have said you need to use GFCI's in the garage with a few exceptions. For your refrigerator or freezer circuit you don't want it to trip so if you need to run a ckt for this type of application install a receptical that only has one outlet.(not a duplex) This would be a dedicated ckt and you can't plug something else in like a drill where you would not be protected.

          The other exception I know of is if you mount the receptical up on the ceiling joists, for a garage door opener or the like. This would be considered to be not readily accessible.

          Tom
          Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool.

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          • #6
            As I understand it. Even if the recept. is not readily accessible it still has to be a GFCI. Could you point me to the section of NEC that says it doesn't.

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            • #7
              swoosh,

              210.8(A)(2) Exceptions 1 & 2

              Rec. that fall into the exceptions, just can't be used to satisfy 210.52(G)

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              • #8
                Thanks ND, I'll need to show that to my inspector.

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