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  • #16
    Re: which oxy acetlyne rig

    i love my supco digital gage it needs to be cleaned allot though.
    how is it that so many answers are in the instructions

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    • #17
      Re: which oxy acetlyne rig

      I used to have a Supco digital and hated it. Its was the pos kind that looked like the christmas tree at the drag strip. Some moron on Ebay bought that pos from me for more than what I paid for it 3 years earlier. I turned around and bought a Yellow Jacket 69040 analog brand new for under $70 on ebay. The wholesaler had them in their computer at the time for $230. I'd be lost without it now. I like the manual adjust temperature compensation. To me, sometimes digital isnt better.

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      • #18
        Re: which oxy acetlyne rig

        digital is not better, i find digital more fragile than anything. i have the supco with the digital screen not the drag lights, but i know which one you are talking about.
        how is it that so many answers are in the instructions

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        • #19
          Re: which oxy acetlyne rig

          Originally posted by gear junkie View Post
          Looking for a new one. Any thoughts on any particular brand?
          I personally like Union Carbide products and normally I can use the Prest- o - lite on a B tank 40 CU ft (acetylene) and the R tank for Oxygen (10 CU FT).

          If I need more fuel /air I my 244 CU FT Oxygen and 130 cu ft tank of acetylene

          For 1" steel cutting and above then I go to my Purox or Oxweld cutting rigs or use cutting rods on my welding machines.

          The problem with using propane is it pockets HIGHLY unstable and does not give a flame as hot as Oxyacetylene approx (5,800 DEG F)

          Acetylene being lighter then air dissipates so its not only a hotter flame it is a safer fuel to use.

          It is also a great idea to get a check valves installed on the torch so the possibility of a hose flame is reduced.

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          • #20
            Re: which oxy acetlyne rig

            Originally posted by BILLG View Post
            this is what I use for ac work. c tips direct heat all around pipe not like the "mile long flame" on standard torch. torch handle is small and light great in tight places. hoses small and very flexible. and it heats FAST I love this torch.

            www.smithequipment.com/products/pdfpages/page12.pdf
            Just ordered this today for 320. Can't wait to try it out.
            Buy cheap, buy twice.

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: which oxy acetylene rig

              By Sylvan Tieger
              The problem with using propane is it pockets HIGHLY unstable and does not give a flame as hot as Oxyacetylene approx (5,800 DEG F)

              Acetylene being lighter then air dissipates so its not only a hotter flame it is a safer fuel to use.
              yes acetylene is a hotter fuel and it is hotter in a different location of the flame. But I will question it safety over propane,

              Because of acetylene's unstable nature, Chemical Composition: An acetylene molecule is composed of two carbon atoms and two hydrogen atoms. The two carbon atoms are held together by what is known as a triple carbon bond. This bond is useful in that it stores substantial energy that can be released as heat during combustion. However, the triple carbon bond is unstable, making acetylene gas very sensitive to conditions such as excess pressure, excess temperature, static electricity, or mechanical shock. (in fast it is so unstable it is dissolved in acetone and a porous filler when under pressure in the tank, did you know it take 7 hrs to fill an acetylene tank).

              one must not use more than 1/7 of a tank in one hour or pressures over 15 psi, and be very careful of the handling of the tanks.


              http://www.msha.gov/alerts/hazardsofacetylene.htm

              Special Hazards of Acetylene

              Acetylene is the most common gas used for fueling cutting torches in both general industry and the mining industry. When mixed with pure oxygen in a cutting torch assembly, an acetylene flame can theoretically reach over 5700°F. Users of this type of equipment are generally familiar with the fire hazards associated hot flames and the production of hot slag. However, many users may not be aware of the unique characteristics of acetylene itself that create special hazards compared to other fuel gases.

              Chemical Composition: An acetylene molecule is composed of two carbon atoms and two hydrogen atoms. The two carbon atoms are held together by what is known as a triple carbon bond. This bond is useful in that it stores substantial energy that can be released as heat during combustion. However, the triple carbon bond is unstable, making acetylene gas very sensitive to conditions such as excess pressure, excess temperature, static electricity, or mechanical shock.

              Storage: Because of acetylene's unstable nature, it must be stored under special conditions. This is accomplished by dissolving the acetylene in liquid acetone. The liquid acetone is then stored in the acetylene cylinder, which in turn, is filled with a porous (sponge-like) cementitious material.
              NEVER ATTEMPT TO STORE OR INJECT ACETYLENE GAS INTO ANY TYPE OF VESSEL, TANK, OR ENCLOSURE. IMPROPERLY STORED ACETYLENE GAS IS UNSTABLE.


              ACETYLENE GAS REGULATORS SHOULD NOT EXCEED A SETTING OF 15 P.S.I.G.


              FLAME ARRESTORS AND CHECK VALVES SHOULD BE INSTALLED AT BOTH THE TORCH BASE HOSE CONNECTIONS AND AT THE REGULATOR HOSE CONNECTIONS.


              ACETYLENE CYLINDERS SHOULD BE PROPERLY SECURED AT ALL TIMES. MOVEMENT OF CYLINDERS SHOULD BE DONE WITH CARE. CYLINDERS SHOULD BE PROTECTED FROM FLAME OR HEAT.
              When exposed to excess temperature, pressure, or mechanical shock, pure or less than pure acetylene gas can undergo a violent, explosive decomposition reaction. Additionally, if this reaction, or an ignition of acetylene occurs within the torch base or supply hose, it can propagate back into the storage cylinder causing it to explode violently.

              Flammable range: Acetylene has a very wide range of flammability. The lower flammable limit (LFL) is typically listed as 2.5% and the upper flammable limit (UFL) is listed as 81%. Although acetylene will not undergo combustion at concentrations above the UFL, it can undergo an explosive decomposition reaction, even at concentrations of 100%.
              NEVER USE ACETYLENE OR ITS EQUIPMENT IN ANY WAY NOT CONSISTANT WITH RECOGNIZED GOOD PRACTICE.


              ALWAYS MAINTAIN ACETYLENE CUTTING EQUIPMENT IN PROPER WORKING CONDITION TO PREVENT INADVERTANT LEAKAGE OF ACETYLENE OR OXYGEN INTO THE SURROUNDING WORK ENVIRONMENT.


              WHILE STORAGE IN A HORIZONTAL POSITION DOES NOT MAKE THE ACETYLENE LESS STABLE OR SAFE, IT DOES INCREASE THE LIKELIHOOD OF SOLVENT LOSS, WHICH WILL RESULT IN A LOWER FLAME QUALITY WHEN THE CYLINDER IS USED. THEREFORE IT IS ALWAYS PREFERABLE TO STORE AN ACETYLENE CYLINDER IN AN UPRIGHT POSITION.
              Acetylene gas is ignitable over a wide range of concentrations.

              Ease of ignition: Acetylene is a very easy gas to ignite. In fact, the energy from a static spark capable of igniting acetylene is lower than for any other fuel gas except hydrogen. The ignition energy of acetylene in air is approximately seventeen times lower than that of methane. The static charge developed by walking across a carpet floor on a dry day can be 1700 times greater than that needed to ignite acetylene. When mixed with pure oxygen, the ignition energy of acetylene is almost 100 times lower than it is in air.
              NEVER DISCHARGE UNBURNED ACETYLENE GAS FROM A TORCH EXCEPT FOR THE NORMAL PROCESS OF LIGHTING THE TORCH.


              NEVER DISCHARGE UNBURNED ACETYLENE GAS FROM A TORCH INTO ANY TYPE OF CONTAINER OR VESSEL.
              When unburned acetylene gas is discharged from a torch, static electricity can be generated at the torch tip. If the tip comes in contact with a ground path, a static spark capable of igniting the acetylene can occur.

              Rate of combustion reaction: Because of its simple chemical make up and sensitive triple bond, acetylene burns at a very fast rate. This very fast burning rate can accelerate the rate at which pressure is generated in an explosion beyond what would occur for other fuels. This, in turn, can make acetylene explosions more violent than for other fuels.
              NEVER DISCHARGE UNBURNED ACETYLENE GAS INTO ANY TYPE OF CONTAINER, VESSEL, ENCLOSURE, OR PIPE (SUCH AS A "POTATO GUN") WITH THE INTENT OF IGNITING THE GAS TO "DEMONSTRATE" THE HAZARDS OF ACETYLENE, OR TO PROPEL AN OBJECT FROM AN ENCLOSURE OR TUBE.
              Because of the very fast reaction rate of burning acetylene, it is not generally possible to design an enclosure to safely vent the explosive pressures. Furthermore, because of the ease of ignition of acetylene, premature ignition is very possible.
              By Sylvan Tieger
              The problem with using propane is it pockets HIGHLY unstable
              What are you referring to? that it is heaver than air?

              any leak on a vaporized fuel is dangerous, lighter than air or heaver than air,
              yes propane has it own set of dangers, but it explosive range is much less, and the power in its explosion is much less, and it is much more stable so stable that is can easily be used as a refrigerant,


              http://www.weldprocedures.com/GAS%20...20WELDING.html
              Oxy-Acetelyne, Oxy-Mapp Gas, and Oxy-Propane are examples of Oxy-Fuel torches. In them pure oxygen is used instead of air. This is done to create a high temperature flame. Oxy-Acetelyne produces the hottest flame at around 6,500 degrees F. Oxy-Mapp Gas produces the second hottest flame at about 6,200 degrees F., with Oxy-Propane producing a flame of about 5,000 degrees F.

              yes, propane it does not get as hot, but still hot enough to braze easily an to preheat steel to white hot and to melt it easily.

              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxy-fue...ng_and_cutting
              Propane
              Propane does not burn as hot as acetylene in its inner cone, and so cannot be used for welding. Propane, however, has a very high number of BTUs per cubic feet in its outer cone, and so with the right torch (injector style) can make a faster and cleaner cut than acetylene, and is much more useful for heating and bending than acetylene.

              Propane is cheaper than acetylene and easier to transport.

              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              I am not saying one should use propane or to use acetylene, but to recognize the potential dangers of each fuel and the precautions that both deserve.
              Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
              attributed to Samuel Johnson
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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              • #22
                Re: which oxy acetlyne rig

                On ship board use, and in mines and under ground applications we used acetylene.

                As a plumber I use propane to heat the lead /solder pot

                Acetylene cannot be laid on its side then used and there is the 15 PSI Rule but I never come close to drawing 15 PSI when using it even for cutting 3" steel

                Propane can cause freeze burns and about it being used for refrigerant Yes and so can Ammonia but I rather go in my time with R 12 or R 22 or R 11 for cleaning.

                I just like the idea of the variety of tanks I can use MC /B etc
                For general plumbing applications I use acetylene cost more but it does give a hotter flame thus is is faster

                Just a matter of personal preference and Acetylene can be manifolded for production welding

                For removing paint from wood I use Kerosene torch (have to pump it up) (now electric heat guns) and when I did Built up roofing I happened to like the Kerosene then propane less violent in lighting


                "Propane is cheaper than acetylene and easier to transport."

                We cannot transport Propane in a tunnel BUT acetylene yes
                Last edited by Sylvan Tieger; 09-26-2007, 05:07 PM.

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                • #23
                  Re: which oxy acetlyne rig

                  As far as heating and cutting go I use MAPP, or propane. Most large steel yards, and scrap operations cut with propane/natural gas(I can cut 12"+ steel with propane). The trick to LP is to hold the torch farther away from your work, not in the inner cone like accetylene. I dont do any O/A welding, so it is MAPP or propane(the cost savings is amazing) for me all the way. Smith, Victor, Harris, and ESAB(Oxweld, Purox, Prest-O-Lite) are all great torches, just get the one you are comfortable using all day.

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                  • #24
                    Re: which oxy acetlyne rig

                    Originally posted by BILLG View Post
                    this is what I use for ac work. c tips direct heat all around pipe not like the "mile long flame" on standard torch. torch handle is small and light great in tight places. hoses small and very flexible. and it heats FAST I love this torch.

                    www.smithequipment.com/products/pdfpages/page12.pdf
                    Just got my torch today. Thanks Bill, it's a great setup. It's so light, I had to adjust to the weight but that's not a bad thing.
                    Buy cheap, buy twice.

                    Comment

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