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  • boiler room make up air

    in enclosing my home basementboiler room as part of a basement remodelling project, i have to choose between two methods of providing air to the gas fired appliances in the soon to be enclosed boiler room. one way is a fan in a can (cas 4) http://www.fieldcontrols.com/cas.php#cas3_4

    the other locally approved way is to provide 1 sq" free space/1000 btu of appliance use through a fire rated damper. my boiler is 150M BTU, HW heater is 40M BTU. with grills over the fire rated dampers, assuming studs on 16" centers, that means two openings in an interior boiler room wall that are roughly 15"x20", one opening 12" from the ceiling and the other opening at least 12" above the floor.

    i realize that, in theory, if the cas-4 were to fail, the boiler would be inoperable. in a pinch, removing the CAS-4 from the boiler wiring would enable boiler use short term until the CAS-4 could be repaired. any thoughts from the pros would be apprecated.
    there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

  • #2
    Re: boiler room make up air

    Either method will satisfy the make up air requirements so you kind of have to look at the pros and cons. Using the fan in a can option has the disadvantage of shutting the boiler down if it fails but then again a good many gas appliances have forced draft fans that do the same thing if they fail. Yes one more link in the mechanical chain. The vents in the wall have the distinct advantage of having no mechanical issues unless you have electric dampers wired to them and also to the appliances. If not the only disadvantage I can think of is that they open the boiler room and possible co2 to the rest of the building. You do have fire dampers on them, yes.?
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    • #3
      Re: boiler room make up air

      yes, dampers must be fire rated.
      there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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      • #4
        Re: boiler room make up air

        IMO all mechanical rooms containing gas fired appliances should have a combustion air supply direct from outside. An intake with an interlocked fan/damper is more efficient but unnecessary unless your code calls for it. I would just use an appropriate sized non-mechanical intake. In your case, a 6” round flexible duct terminating within 1’ of the burner would be sufficient.
        You will never expand your mind, if you do not challenge your beliefs.

        By the reading of this post, you acknowledge and agree that the poster shall not be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with use of or reliance on any content contained herein.

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        • #5
          Re: boiler room make up air

          Up there in Alberta; don't you have problems with frozen pipes when you do that.?
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          • #6
            Re: boiler room make up air

            we never have the make up air right next to a burner

            if we have the room we will have it ducted up to the ceiling and bown to the floor but make sure there are no pipes close
            Charlie

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            • #7
              Re: boiler room make up air

              The pipe doesn't freeze, the inside termination does ice up a bit though (hence the term, Eskimo Pot), but only when its really cold like -25C or colder.

              For mid-efficient furnace installs our code requires a combustion air intake. It must terminate with 1ft above and within 2ft horizontally from the burner level of the appliance having the largest input. Also, we must have a fresh air intake (make up air) direct to the return plenum.

              Combustion air and make up air are two different things.

              Combustion air - the air required for satisfactory combustion, including; primary air, secondary air and excess air.

              Make up air, fresh air intake or ventillation air - air that is admited to a space containing an appliance(s) to replace air exhausted through a ventilation opening or by means of exfiltration (also dryers, bath fans, range hoods etc...).

              There are three basic types of mechanical ventilation systems. A balanced system, a supply-only system and an exhaust-only system. The trend now is towards HRV (heat recovery ventilators) as an alternative to the conventional balanced system.
              Last edited by Hondahead; 03-23-2008, 11:01 PM.
              You will never expand your mind, if you do not challenge your beliefs.

              By the reading of this post, you acknowledge and agree that the poster shall not be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with use of or reliance on any content contained herein.

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              • #8
                Re: boiler room make up air

                Hi,

                I went through this two years ago .I provided two 8" stove pipes with weighted dampers and lead fuse attached to a plentium which attached to basement window. In snow country you need to bring the air intake up to what ever your local, snow fall is in your area.

                The advantage is you will probably never have to change a thermal coupling again.

                The new fire code here requires 5/8' sheetrock on both sides of the boiler room wall, door has to have spring loaded hinges and be fire rated for 20 min.

                You will also loose some of the heat in the basement

                Good Luck
                Antique

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