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  • Duct insulation

    I live in northern Ohio and this AM I was sitting by a vent when the furnace came on. I get a period of cold air before the warm air starts.
    Would wrapping the ductwork in the basement help,solve.or be a good move?

  • #2
    Re: Duct insulation

    Dont worry about that too much as it is normal.

    The existing ductwork should be already be insulated either externally or internally lined.

    The brief period of cool air you are getting is nothing more than the air that is in the duct being forced out ahead of the now heated air.

    Hope that makes sense, I am having trouble explaining things to my guys this morning. (Guess I got a case of the "stupids" today).

    Regards,

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    • #3
      Re: Duct insulation

      Insulating your duct work and pipes is another added step to save money over a period of time.

      If your wall insulation (celing/attic/walls/floor) is to the highest R-value ('strength' of insulation), you have brand new windows insulated windows, and your furnance is the most efficient possible, then you may want to take the next step and insulate hot water pipes and duct work.

      You will always experience the rush of cold air, but it should only be for a few seconds. Theoretically, you could eliminate the rush of cold air if you were able to seal the vents to the house each time the furnance shut off. Plus, the cold air is really ambient temperature for either the house, basement, or foundation. Moving/blowing air feels as if it is a lower temperature that it really is.

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