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  • what SEER is this

    We have been struggling with my daughter's A/C, not working well at all. Have had some guys in, and mostly the "wrong" guy, because none hase really checked out why the compressor shuts down. But the latest guy did say that the system is mis-matched. He says 14 SEER cased evap coil, 8 SEER condensing unit. The indoor coil was new about a year ago. ( Hasn't really worked well since!). So it could well be 13 or 14. The outdoor unit is at least 10 yrs old, could be a little more. Here is the model number: HEIL. VILLAGER. ACS036A2C1 manufacturere number: NACS035A2C1

    Can anyone tell what SEER that outdoor unit is?

  • #2
    Re: what SEER is this

    I hope someone that knows the brand can help you better than I can. I will say that the condenser unit (outside) and your evaporator coil(s) inside your furnace need to be properly matched along with having the proper orifice. Can you see a name plate with info on the coils inside of your furnace? If they are the newer part and your furnace is pretty new, it might be best to replace the condensing unit outside if it is 10 or more years old and if it was properly installed it should be less work too.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: what SEER is this

      Higher SEER Evaporator Coil + Lower SEER Condenser= No problem (this is what you have)

      Lower Seer Evaporator Coil + Higher SEER Condenser= Big problem (If coil is non TXV)

      Point being mismatch is NOT the issue if you have a newer (2 year old) evaporator coil.

      If only the compressor is shutting down that means the compressor is going out internals... Verify Condenser is clean, Verify system charge (superheat and subcooling)

      Take amp draw on Condenser Fan motor (CFM). Check for slop in the CFM shaft (side to side).

      Verify microfarad output of compressor and CFM capacitors...

      Only advice I can give is to call another company unless you are HVAC savy

      Okie
      Last edited by OkieBill; 08-10-2009, 10:34 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: What SEER is this?

        This link should help you find a HEIL dealer-distributor in your area.

        http://www.heil-hvac.com/dealer.asp?distributor=yes

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: what SEER is this

          lovetheUSA

          In regard to your daughter living in the house, did the AC work well earlier or has it been poor since her first using it?

          As Bill mentioned it may be something simple like restricted air flow or improper charge levels. Bad capacitors would cause the compressor to malfunction (draw too much running current or fail to start up) and cause it to cycle on the overload protector.

          This may seem crazy but please give this a try and report what happens.

          1 - After letting everything rest about 1/2 hour start up the AC and be sure the compressor and fan runs in the outside unit. Also be sure there is good air flow from your supply registers. After a few minutes cut power to your furnace while standing near where the supply and return lines connect to your inside coils. Be sure it's nice and quiet. Count or time how long you hear a hissing sound. It it only last a few seconds you have a low charge.

          Most likely you need to have a good HVAC tech check everything and someone known around the area to be competent. If his Massa (master of slaves) is the greedy kind he may be under great pressure to sell you a new system when you only need a minor repair or adjustment.

          Hmmm - If you sent the thermostat real low and just leave things run, about how long does the compressor run? Does the fan in the outside unit keep running?

          If she has an attic is there ventilation? An attic that's hotter than "The Bad Place" can put a serious load on the AC and especially the bed rooms.
          Last edited by Woussko; 08-10-2009, 09:22 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: what SEER is this

            Originally posted by Woussko View Post
            lovetheUSA

            In regard to your daughter living in the house, did the AC work well earlier or has it been poor since her first using it?

            As Bill mentioned it may be something simple like restricted air flow or improper charge levels. Bad capacitors would cause the compressor to malfunction (draw too much running current or fail to start up) and cause it to cycle on the overload protector.

            This may seem crazy but please give this a try and report what happens.

            1 - After letting everything rest about 1/2 hour start up the AC and be sure the compressor and fan runs in the outside unit. Also be sure there is good air flow from your supply registers. After a few minutes cut power to your furnace while standing near where the supply and return lines connect to your inside coils. Be sure it's nice and quiet. Count or time how long you hear a hissing sound. It it only last a few seconds you have a low charge.

            I'm always up to learn something new please explain to me how this method works
            An easier way for a layman to get an idea about the charge is to simply pull back the insulation on the larger of the two copper lines (suction line) at the evaporator coil and see if there is any frost on it ( Frost/ice= possible low charge)

            Most likely you need to have a good HVAC tech check everything and someone known around the area to be competent. If his Massa (master of slaves) is the greedy kind he may be under great pressure to sell you a new system when you only need a minor repair or adjustment.

            Hmmm - If you sent the thermostat real low and just leave things run, about how long does the compressor run? Does the fan in the outside unit keep running?

            If she has an attic is there ventilation? An attic that's hotter than "The Bad Place" can put a serious load on the AC and especially the bed rooms.
            Bill

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: what SEER is this

              Thats a round unit. Real sure they were 10 seer. Not the greatest unit ever built. Extremely inexpensive builders model. The serial will most likely start with an "L" followed by 4 digits which are the date code. For instance, L2100 was built the 21st week of 2000.

              Andy

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: what SEER is this

                If the new evap coil is a non bleed expansion valve and the compressor does not have a sicnificant rest time between starts the compressor will cut off on thermal overload, installing a hard start kit will usually solve this problem.

                Hope this helps.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: what SEER is this

                  Originally posted by woussko View Post
                  lovetheusa


                  this may seem crazy but please give this a try and report what happens.

                  1 - after letting everything rest about 1/2 hour start up the ac and be sure the compressor and fan runs in the outside unit. Also be sure there is good air flow from your supply registers. After a few minutes cut power to your furnace while standing near where the supply and return lines connect to your inside coils. Be sure it's nice and quiet. count or time how long you hear a hissing sound. It it only last a few seconds you have a low charge. you have got to be kidding me

                  my favorite part about this quote:
                  most likely you need to have a good hvac tech check everything and someone known around the area to be competent.
                  1

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: what SEER is this

                    Originally posted by OkieBill View Post
                    An easier way for a layman to get an idea about the charge is to simply pull back the insulation on the larger of the two copper lines (suction line) at the evaporator coil and see if there is any frost on it ( Frost/ice= possible low charge)

                    "Beer can cold"
                    Most have heard this so I'll explain!

                    Frost will only show face once it has frozen the entire inside coil. Remember the issue with a low charge is that it causes the evap to be to WARM and your super heat will be too HIGH. You'll get 60*+ at the suction line. Horrible for beer and for good AC.
                    You must check the obvious of course, filters, airflow, dirty condenser......
                    This is true 90% of the time. Now all this proves is you (the homeowner) need help and that the charge must be verified and then charged properly. Better yet, figure out where it went while you're at it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: what SEER is this

                      Originally posted by rjm78 View Post
                      "Beer can cold"
                      Most have heard this so I'll explain!

                      Frost will only show face once it has frozen the entire inside coil. Remember the issue with a low charge is that it causes the evap to be to WARM and your super heat will be too HIGH. You'll get 60*+ at the suction line. Horrible for beer and for good AC.
                      You must check the obvious of course, filters, airflow, dirty condenser......
                      This is true 90% of the time. Now all this proves is you (the homeowner) need help and that the charge must be verified and then charged properly. Better yet, figure out where it went while you're at it.

                      Now we are splitting hairs...

                      This all depends on how low the system charge is and Wet Bulb and Dry Bulb temperatures ect.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: what SEER is this

                        If it's too low, it'll never frost over. If it's a little low, it'll never frost over. If it's a good deal low.....it will eventually frost over. Dry bulb and wet bulb make no difference. Air has moisture. Humidity will freeze on the lower (X) passes of the evap. It will continue to freeze until it drops the outlet temp of the evaps refrigerant and then you'll get liqued back to the compressor. That's when you see the frost.
                        I bring this up to help the LAYMEN
                        Beer Can Cold, can't go wrong

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: what SEER is this

                          Originally posted by rjm78 View Post
                          If it's too low, it'll never frost over. If it's a little low, it'll never frost over. If it's a good deal low.....it will eventually frost over. Dry bulb and wet bulb make no difference. Air has moisture. Humidity will freeze on the lower (X) passes of the evap. It will continue to freeze until it drops the outlet temp of the evaps refrigerant and then you'll get liqued back to the compressor. That's when you see the frost.
                          I bring this up to help the LAYMEN
                          Beer Can Cold, can't go wrong
                          So you are saying Load conditions are not a factor in determining proper charge???

                          In laymens terms Frost will form when the suction pressure falls below freezing (56 PSI or less for R-22) If the system is so low that it will not frost you will not get a cooling effect.

                          We are talking way above laymen now

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: what SEER is this

                            Okie,
                            You sound pretty sure of yourself. Are you in the trade, out in the field?
                            If so, I welcome you to start a unit after being off for a while and tell me how long it takes it to frost the suction line when it's a 50# suction pressure. I assure you it'll be hours. If a home owner goes out to there just started AC and feels the line, it'll be cool at best.
                            And yes, conditions affect for charging, but we're not talking about that....only how to determine that it may be low in the first place.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: what SEER is this

                              Trades? ewwwwwe that would mean getting my hands dirty...

                              I gain all of my knowledge and insights from the internet and classes at Home Depot I consider myself a Super DIY'er.

                              I did not realize the person was under a time constraint in determining their charge condition since they have been letting this system run, a frost check is as good as anything for a laymen in this case.

                              You and I both know that the only way to assess the charge in a system is wetbulb/drybulb-superheat/subcooling eveything else is hackery so I read

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