Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Combustion Exhaust CO?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Combustion Exhaust CO?

    I was wondering what percentage, if any, a typical combustion exhaust CO emits on an external gas furnace?

    Someone had piped it under their house and I told them to get it out.

    They DO have a CO detector that has not ever gone off.

    Wondering & trying to learn....

    J.C.

  • #2
    Re: Combustion Exhaust CO?

    What do you mean by "external gas furnace"?

    I have hit 200 ppm with my CO meter on standard forced air furnace exhaust.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Combustion Exhaust CO?

      Originally posted by OkieBill View Post
      What do you mean by "external gas furnace"?

      I have hit 200 ppm with my CO meter on standard forced air furnace exhaust.
      I think that's what I mean Bill. Standard Forced Air Furnace. Normal efficiency a few years old.

      J.C.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Combustion Exhaust CO?

        If I'm not mistaken, CO makes up a very small percentage of the flue gas. It's the potential of improper combustion that will increase the risk of CO poisoning and makes it so dangerous. If there is a crack, or flue leak....AND......it's very dirty or has poor combustion air, then you'll be on trouble. Normally though, I would bet it's not very high ppm at all.
        Most CO detectors dont go off until the level gets to a very amount. Thats why slow poisoning is often mis-diagnosed as flue like symptoms. If a bird plugs the flue....the detector will def go off........I little crack in the inducer housing.....it probbably wont even chirp. Both are very dangerous situations.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Combustion Exhaust CO?

          Here's what you need.


          http://www.davis.com/catalog/product...ku=1011040&pfx=



          James

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Combustion Exhaust CO?

            First off this can't meet code so why question it any further?
            "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
            John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Combustion Exhaust CO?

              Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
              First off this can't meet code so why question it any further?
              True but it does bring up an interesting question.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Combustion Exhaust CO?

                No mention of the efficiency of the furnace was made here and that says a lot.

                I am assuming it is an 80%. The venting requirements of such a unit are by code required to have a minimum amount of raise of 1/4" per foot.

                Exhausting under the home is the most hazardous scenario there is.

                Just because you read low CO with a combustion tester does not even begin to address what the other constituents elements of the flue gas are doing to the under structure of the home.

                Wood will rot, copper and other metal fixtures rust and the the fumes will find their way into the home as different types of chemical composition that is deleterious to children's and elderly folks.

                Not to mention it is just plain stupid to vent a heating appliance under a home.


                Last edited by hvaclover; 01-21-2010, 05:15 AM.
                Just slow, not stupid

                Comment

                Working...
                X