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  • Combustion air for oil furnace.

    Hello again,
    In another post, I asked questions about 4" vent pipe for my small oil burning furnace. Now I have a question about the combustion air. According to what I read in NFPA-31 (code for oil burning furnace and equipment), it states that the combustion air must be brought in to the furnace form outside the room if the room that is being heated is a confined space with poor ventilation (I am paraphrasing here. This is not the exact wording, but close enough for discussion). I am installing a small 60K BTU oil burning furnace in my 2-car garage. The garage has a sheetrock 8 foot ceiling, and it also has a brand new double wide door in front, and a standard size human access door in the rear. There is also a door that gives access to my house. All doors are fairly air-tight and well insulated. My question is, do I need to run a pipe from outside the garage to bring combustion air into the furnace, or is a 2-car garage large enough to satisfy the NFPA-31 rule about a confined space? At least one of the doors gets opened and closed 10 to 15 times each day, and I will never operate the furnace at night when I'm not working in the garage. During those times, I use an electric space-heater to keep everything from freezing.

    Any suggestions would be much appreciated.

  • #2
    Re: Combustion air for oil furnace.

    I've never ran across this situation yet, but here is something you should keep in mind.

    Which ever oil burner that is going on this furnace, you should go to that manufactures website and read what is required for the installation. Most likely a kit will have to be installed on the oil burner, if you're going the "fresh air inlet route". Manufacture's information on burner setup TRUMPS everything you might read by someone else, so keep that in mind as well.

    Personally from what you described so far, It doesn't seem to me that you will have any negative pressure inside the room where this furnace will be installed.

    But since I've never ran across this situation...I'm hopeful someone with more knowledge of this will chime in.

    (I also would like to say that I don't really like giving information on burner service, for the simple reason a wrong move on the homeowners parts could result in serious injury or death. Oil burners is just something not to be played around with.)
    Last edited by Flux; 11-11-2010, 11:50 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Combustion air for oil furnace.

      Originally posted by Flux View Post
      I've never ran across this situation yet, but here is something you should keep in mind.

      Which ever oil burner that is going on this furnace, you should go to that manufactures website and read what is required for the installation. Most likely a kit will have to be installed on the oil burner, if you're going the "fresh air inlet route". Manufacture's information on burner setup TRUMPS everything you might read by someone else, so keep that in mind as well.

      Yes, I did check the mfgr's information in the furnace installation manual. My problem is, the furnace was originally designed to be used in a mobile home. i.e., both heated air output, and combustion air input are located under the furnace. In order to bring in combustion air, I would have to order a special kit that allows combustion air to be plumbed into the bottom furnace plate. It would make my installation much more costly and complex, and would probably not make the installation significantly safer or more efficient.

      Personally from what you described so far, It doesn't seem to me that you will have any negative pressure inside the room where this furnace will be installed.

      I came to that same conclusion, but I still wanted to hear it from at least a couple of professionals.

      But since I've never ran across this situation...I'm hopeful someone with more knowledge of this will chime in.

      I hope that someone else chimes in too.

      (I also would like to say that I don't really like giving information on burner service, for the simple reason a wrong move on the homeowners parts could result in serious injury or death. Oil burners is just something not to be played around with.)

      The same could be said about gas or wood burning furnaces. Any appliance that burns any type of fuel can be deadly if mis-installed, mis-serviced, or mis-used.

      Thanks for your input!
      Mike

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      • #4
        Re: Combustion air for oil furnace.

        Be careful with your installation. If it was listed and approved for a mobile home, it may only be legal to install it in a mobile home.

        Mark
        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Combustion air for oil furnace.

          Agree with Mark. This application would not be approved here (NJ).

          Remember its not only the inspection, but insurance should a fire start there will be questions that could lead to you not being covered. so even if you got around an inspection one way or another, you could still have problems down the road.
          ---------------
          Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
          ---------------
          “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
          ---------
          "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
          ---------
          sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Combustion air for oil furnace.

            Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
            Agree with Mark. This application would not be approved here (NJ).

            Remember its not only the inspection, but insurance should a fire start there will be questions that could lead to you not being covered. so even if you got around an inspection one way or another, you could still have problems down the road.
            Yes, I am concerned about the insurance issue. But I should mention that, although this furnace was originally designed for a mobile home, this model can be used in a non-manufactured (standard permanent home) with a different attachment plate. The installation manual mentions a number of different applications. So, I apologize for leading you to believe that it was designed ONLY for a mobile home.

            BTW - I am going to have a licensed and bonded HVAC guy install the exhaust stack for me, which will hold more credibility in the event of fire than if I installed it myself. I may be just a homeowner with little HVAC experience, but I am going about this project intelligently and as safely as practical.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Combustion air for oil furnace.

              Originally posted by Xray View Post
              Hello again,
              In another post, I asked questions about 4" vent pipe for my small oil burning furnace. Now I have a question about the combustion air. According to what I read in NFPA-31 (code for oil burning furnace and equipment), it states that the combustion air must be brought in to the furnace form outside the room if the room that is being heated is a confined space with poor ventilation (I am paraphrasing here. This is not the exact wording, but close enough for discussion). I am installing a small 60K BTU oil burning furnace in my 2-car garage. The garage has a sheetrock 8 foot ceiling, and it also has a brand new double wide door in front, and a standard size human access door in the rear. There is also a door that gives access to my house. All doors are fairly air-tight and well insulated. My question is, do I need to run a pipe from outside the garage to bring combustion air into the furnace, or is a 2-car garage large enough to satisfy the NFPA-31 rule about a confined space? At least one of the doors gets opened and closed 10 to 15 times each day, and I will never operate the furnace at night when I'm not working in the garage. During those times, I use an electric space-heater to keep everything from freezing.

              Any suggestions would be much appreciated.

              Whats The total SQ Footage of the area where the Furnace is going to be installed?


              Also completely off the Topic but are you Hanging this unit?

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