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  • Multiple Thermostats

    I have seen issues where heating systems either failed to work, or got "stuck on" due to a number of reasons. In one case it was the failure of an electronic thermostat to call for heat, possibly due to a lightning strike. Another time, an elderly person turned the heat up as high as possible to warm up the house fast, and forgot to turn it back. While I am at this point only discussing heating issues, I realize similar things could happen on the cooling side...

    Having the heating way too hot, or shutting down when nobody is around could either waste a lot of fuel or lead to pipes freezing, etc. Vacation or weekend homes, houses for sale, etc. might fit in this scenario. (I have heard stories of potential buyers adjusting the heat in vacant houses to see if the heating works, then never setting it back to where it should be.)

    I like the idea of the setback electronic thermostats, and have used them in my home for over 25 years. Some of the earlier ones did fail, but the newer ones seem to be more reliable. My current set-back thermostat is over 15 years old, and has never given me any trouble, but I still worry about what might happen if the thermostat were to fail when I am away for a few days.

    I am curious if anyone has added additional thermostats to provide some redundancy. First, a standard heating thermostat could be installed in series with the first and set to a "maximum" house temperature, say 75 degrees. This could be wired to interupt both the fan and burner, or only the burner. I would probably use something like the old reliable Honeywell bimetalic thermostat in this situation, and that the thermostat itself could be installed perhaps in the basement near the furnace where it is unlikely to be fiddled with. In the event the electronic thermostat fails in the "On" mode, or someone tampers with the settings, the house temperature would be maintained at an appropriate level.

    A second mechanical thermostat could be wired in parallel across the electronic thermostat, perhaps in the basement again, and set for a minimum temperature. This might be 45 degrees or something. In the event of failure or tampering of the main thermostat, this thermostat would maintain a minimum temperature, keeping pipes from freezing.

    With the addition of the series and parallel thermostats, the minimum and maximum accepted temperatures could be preset. (This might be appropriate in rental units where the landlord pays the fuel bills.)
    Last edited by Brookline1027; 01-28-2011, 03:35 AM.

  • #2
    Re: Multiple Thermostats

    Honeywell VisionPro 8000 can do all those things. It's not cheap and you'll have to buy additional accessories to do what you want.

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    • #3
      Re: Multiple Thermostats

      The job of a low voltage transformer is 110 volts AC to the primary purpose, and transform, or lower the voltage of 24 volts at the end of high school. Therefore the transformer label, after "PRI" 120, 208, 240 and SEC 24V 40VA. The transformer that we sell can be used with multiple voltages, 120 volts, 208 volts or 240 volts. Connecting the correct thread color coding to use the power it has. The addresses of tension wire colors are on the top of the transformer. For example: The son of white and black is used for 120 volts for most ovens. The white cable connects to Orange if the transformer is used to replace a faulty transformer in an air conditioner or heat pump that uses 240 volts out.
      morgan halabu | andy elfmont

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      • #4
        Re: Multiple Thermostats

        Originally posted by jimfaster View Post
        The job of a low voltage transformer is 110 volts AC to the primary purpose, and transform, or lower the voltage of 24 volts at the end of high school. Therefore the transformer label, after "PRI" 120, 208, 240 and SEC 24V 40VA. The transformer that we sell can be used with multiple voltages, 120 volts, 208 volts or 240 volts. Connecting the correct thread color coding to use the power it has. The addresses of tension wire colors are on the top of the transformer. For example: The son of white and black is used for 120 volts for most ovens. The white cable connects to Orange if the transformer is used to replace a faulty transformer in an air conditioner or heat pump that uses 240 volts out.

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        • #5
          Re: Multiple Thermostats

          never used a electronic thermostat, but there is a simple way of keeping the old type of thermostat from being set up to high, (when the kids were small, I just drove a headless nail in the wall to block the adjustment lever from being turned up beyond where we thought it should be,
          and I have used thermostats that had a internal "block: that could be set, in some places, (it basically was just a small slide that was tightened up to keep the adjustment lever from being moved past a point).
          Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
          attributed to Samuel Johnson
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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          • #6
            Re: Multiple Thermostats

            Originally posted by jimfaster View Post
            The job of a low voltage transformer is 110 volts AC to the primary purpose, and transform, or lower the voltage of 24 volts at the end of high school. Therefore the transformer label, after "PRI" 120, 208, 240 and SEC 24V 40VA. The transformer that we sell can be used with multiple voltages, 120 volts, 208 volts or 240 volts. Connecting the correct thread color coding to use the power it has. The addresses of tension wire colors are on the top of the transformer. For example: The son of white and black is used for 120 volts for most ovens. The white cable connects to Orange if the transformer is used to replace a faulty transformer in an air conditioner or heat pump that uses 240 volts out.


            ?!?!!??!?
            "24 volts at the end of high school"
            "The son of white and black"

            JIM! What in Sam Hill are you talking about?

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            • #7
              Re: Multiple Thermostats

              That post needs to be nominated for the best post in the history of posting. Never before has anybody said so much about so little in such confusion before
              sigpic

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              • #8
                Re: Multiple Thermostats

                Originally posted by jimfaster View Post
                The job of a low voltage transformer is 110 volts AC to the primary purpose, and transform, or lower the voltage of 24 volts at the end of high school. Therefore the transformer label, after "PRI" 120, 208, 240 and SEC 24V 40VA. The transformer that we sell can be used with multiple voltages, 120 volts, 208 volts or 240 volts. Connecting the correct thread color coding to use the power it has. The addresses of tension wire colors are on the top of the transformer. For example: The son of white and black is used for 120 volts for most ovens. The white cable connects to Orange if the transformer is used to replace a faulty transformer in an air conditioner or heat pump that uses 240 volts out.
                !VIVA le MaSheen!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Multiple Thermostats

                  Nice jibberish! Sounds like KGB talking in code ...over
                  ''Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" Benjamin Franklin

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