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  • hvac question

    I recently built a new home and had a hvac installed. Since then, I have been told that there could have been a hookup to the bathroom to ventilate the steam from showering. If this is so, I would like to know how to do it so that I could eliminate the ceiling vent that is there now
    thanks for any help bob

  • #2
    Bobby, I do not know what someone has told you about a different vent for your bathroom steam from the shower etc... I am an hvac tech and the only thing I know that could have been done would be to put in a return duct going back to your air handler return. But I believe you would not want to do this because your return air from your rooms etc.. is what you are trying to cool or heat. Then all of the humidity IE steam is the last thing you want pulling into your system. I am not a licensed contractor and do not know it all since I have only been doing this for six years. Hope this helps, if you could tell me more who told you what i maybe can help more.

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    • #3
      thanks for the reply ben. As I understand it, it runs on a thermostat- when you shower it comes on and vents the moist air to the outside. Of course I could be all wet. haha bob

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      • #4
        exhaust fan is prefered in bath room. return air hookup will put smell throughout conditioned space

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        • #5
          Most localities do not allow return air from bathrooms into rest of house. This is the reason there are no return ducts in bathroom. But it would be nice to be able to use that humidity in the rest of the house in the heating season

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          • #6
            Most localities do not allow you to put a return air in a bathroom or kitchen. Bath fans are usually installed using a light switch with the fan vented to the outside. Make sure the pipe is insulated and pitch toward the outside to prevent condensation from dripping back into the bathroom.

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            • #7
              First, In some cases a small exhaust is located directly above or to the side of the shower to take the steam out before it gets into the room. Although moister makes a house more comfortable in the winter there is no place for it in the summer. If you have AC it will make your AC system work harder.

              Secondly, moister can condense on window glass and in your walls in the winter. consider getting rid of the syeam with a fan at the source and exhaust it to the outside.

              Thirdly, You can get an air to air heat exchanger. This device will allow out door air (being Hot or cold) to be heated or cooled by the exhaust air from the house. In some cases an air to air heat exchanger is used to makeup air into a house/building and the bathrooms are all exhausted through the heat exchanger.

              I hope this helps

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              • #8
                Yea, I have a house and had same problem. I have been into HVAC work now for 12 years and it came in very handy when I bought my 60 year old house. I had put a drop in the bathroom and it took care of that problem.
                So hows the Ridgid working for work everone ?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by geoken:
                  Most localities do not allow you to put a return air in a bathroom or kitchen. Bath fans are usually installed using a light switch with the fan vented to the outside. Make sure the pipe is insulated and pitch toward the outside to prevent condensation from dripping back into the bathroom.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by reyab:
                    </font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by geoken:
                    Most localities do not allow you to put a return air in a bathroom or kitchen. Bath fans are usually installed using a light switch with the fan vented to the outside. Make sure the pipe is insulated and pitch toward the outside to prevent condensation from dripping back into the bathroom.
                    </font>[/QUOTE]

                    [ 08-09-2004, 07:30 AM: Message edited by: reyab ]

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                    • #11
                      geoken is good besides drawing air from a restroom is unsanitary

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                      • #12
                        hey guys im just gettin the hang of this computer excuse my post

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