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  • Solar furnace as a supplemental heat source.

    So I stumbled onto this solar furnace and I was wonderering if any of the members have actually run the calculations or have installed this set up. It seems like a good idea but I have yet to see this done around town. There isn't very much information out there but this seems like a good way to supplement heat for a small home or cottage. It is a bit unattractive installed on the side but apparently in can be installed of a roof as well.

    The solar furnace has a small fan that is solar powered has a wall mount control and claims to provide warm air even on cloudy day. Might be a good heat source for a workshop.
    This SolarSheat solar powered space heating air collector can be installed on a wall or roof and ducted in to provide space heating for areas measuring up to 400 sq. ft. Helps save on heating bills and requires no electricity. <b>Oversize shipping charge applies.</b>
    Last edited by Mightyservant; 02-17-2018, 10:15 PM.

  • #2
    IMO for that money it would not be worth it,

    look up some old mother earth and they have plans for simple solar collectors that would be able to fit in a window,

    https://www.motherearthnews.com/diy/...g-zmaz77sozgoe

    you could build a collector a lot larger and for a lot lower cost,

    add a small thermostat, and a small fan and you will have nearly the same thing for a fraction of the cost,

    more ideas
    https://www.google.com/search?q=sola...iw=931&bih=628
    Last edited by BHD; 02-18-2018, 08:21 AM.
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    • Mightyservant
      Mightyservant commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you for your input BHD, I guess I don't want to have to make one, I just don't have the energy for it anymore.

      I did see a gal on You Tube build one and it seemed ok, a couple things seemed taco on it, but it ended up looking clean on the exterior of her house.

      This same unit on Amazon is $3000 which is a little ridiculous, clearly someone was looking to make a buck on a unsuspecting sucker.

  • #3
    It's VERY inefficient. It uses 1000 watts of power and only gives you 1650 btus per hour. Pure electric alone will give you 3412 btus per 1000 watts. Additionally, btus needed is not calculated on square footage, it's calculated on heat loss of the structure. 1650 BTU/hr will hardly heat a doghouse in cold weather.
    ~~

    ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

    Comment


    • Mightyservant
      Mightyservant commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you for the input Plumber Punky, for arguments sake, I'd say If it's picking 30% of your heating requirement it might be worth a look. The suns energy is free (sort of) so in theory you save some money the question is if it's worth it.

      I'm under no illusion that this is going to push out blazing heat, one look at the fan which appears to be no more than a the same type albeit larger version of a cooling fan you'd see on a computer case and you quickly get the idea that this is a passive source of heat...at best.

      I've got a detached damp workshop that might be a good candidate for this if it makes sense.

  • #4
    Here is a good article on the subject, check out the member comments, it sort of makes you wonder.
    A solar hot air collector is basically a black box with glass on one side. Instead of heating fluid that circulates through tubing, a solar hot air collector is like a parked car. When the sun shines on the collector, the air inside gets hot.
    Last edited by Mightyservant; 02-18-2018, 12:31 PM.

    Comment


    • #5
      Maybe I'm missing something here...but it seems like you are using 1000 Watts to collect 1650 btu/hr...since 1 Watt = 3.41 btu that's about 48% efficiency. You may be better off with an electric heater than this system. A small heat pump may make more sense.

      Possibly there are other models out there with better efficiency numbers.

      Comment


      • Mightyservant
        Mightyservant commented
        Editing a comment
        Nope everything I've read thus far is linked. My question is if it's a passive system is it worth it? The author in post #4 made some interesting comments which highlights the limitations of a system like this.

        Like everything else though there are going to be some folks who like one system over another for different reasons perhaps with some just wanting to believe.

        We have all sat in our cars warmed by the sun light on cold sunny days, I figured there must be something to this.

      • blue_can
        blue_can commented
        Editing a comment
        I'm not able to read the article - it says you have to be a GBA subscriber.

        But if I'm reading the information correctly for this system you will be better off with straight electric heat since if you putting in 1000 watts as since most electric systems are about 90% efficient you will get about 3000 btu/hr converting the electricity to heat as opposed to collecting it from outside. Again it is possible I'm missing something.

        You are correct in that there is radiant heat from the sun that can be collected even on a cold day (greenhouse effect) but you would want to system to be able to collect that heat for less input energy like a heat pump. I'm not sure you gaining anything from using this specific system.

      • Mightyservant
        Mightyservant commented
        Editing a comment
        My apologies, It was a screwup. If you enter that in phrase in your search bar and add green building advisor it will come up.

        I gather what your saying is that your can buy a lot heat for the cost of the system moreover a far more efficient method to heat a space.

        My thinking is if it's worth it to provide "supplementary" heat, even if your can 10% percent on your energy consumption it might make it interesting.

    • #6
      Originally posted by Mightyservant View Post
      So I stumbled onto this solar furnace and I was wonderering if any of the members have actually run the calculations or have installed this set up. It seems like a good idea but I have yet to see this done around town. There isn't very much information out there but this seems like a good way to supplement heat for a small home or cottage. It is a bit unattractive installed on the side but apparently in can be installed of a roof as well.

      The solar furnace has a small fan that is solar powered has a wall mount control and claims to provide warm air even on cloudy day. Might be a good heat source for a workshop.
      Solar Assisted Mini Split Heat Pump

      Have you heard that before?

      A solar-assisted heat pump (SAHP) is a machine that represents the integration of a heat pump and thermal solar panels in a single integrated system.

      One of the cleanest and most affordable ways to heat and cool homes and businesses is by using ductless heat pumps that are powered by solar energy. Many satisfied customers have installed both a solar PV system and mini splits.

      Comment


      • #7
        SAHP are a pain in the arse.
        ~~

        ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

        Comment

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