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AC for casement window

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  • AC for casement window

    We have a 350sq ft bedroom upstairs that gets sweltering hot in spite of central air.

    I was going to supplement with a window unit but they're only 12" wide casement swing out windows.

    I have seen where they sell casement/slider style units like the FFRS1022R1 but it's too wide.

    I think I need at least 8000 btu to do the job.

    I've thought about using a portable unit and running hoses through a piece of plexiglass inserted into the window but I've read bad reviews about portable units.

    I've also considered a split system but would rather not get too invasive.

    Any suggestions for my situation?

    Do they make shinny but tall window units at least 8000 btu?



  • #2
    Mini-split is probably one of the least invasive you can get other than a straight window unit which is not an option apparently for you.

    Mini-split needs a small hole in the wall, depending on the unit about 1-1/2", plus you need to get power outside from the breaker panel.

    Another option is install a sleeve for a thru-wall unit.
    "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

    https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1p...qcZKHyrqKhikFA

    ----

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    • #3
      do more research on mini splits before you get one, they are still working out the bugs in them. i recently talked to a ac tech about them, he said they are getting better but still not at the reliability of central units.
      we have one at work thats been installed about 4 years and its had some kind of problem at least once per year where it stopped cooling, requiring a service tech. i love my window units at home, i can usually get 10 years out of one with no service calls required.
      HEY! What does this button do?

      Comment


      • #4
        I like the relatively simple concept of window airs but Mini Splits have been around for many years and are reliable.
        They are just not as prevalent in this country.

        Comment


        • Bob D.
          Bob D. commented
          Editing a comment
          In the country of Minnesota? They are everywhere here in New Jersey. Maybe not as popular further north but I don't see why.

      • #5
        Originally posted by UTILITYMETERREPAIR View Post
        do more research on mini splits before you get one, they are still working out the bugs in them. i recently talked to a ac tech about them, he said they are getting better but still not at the reliability of central units.
        we have one at work thats been installed about 4 years and its had some kind of problem at least once per year where it stopped cooling, requiring a service tech. i love my window units at home, i can usually get 10 years out of one with no service calls required.
        I guess if you buy the cheaper ones that is a concern. I've had 2 Sanyo units for over 10 years now and still going strong, ZERO repairs or problems. Mine are both heat pumps not just AC, so they get used year round. Sanyo is now part of Panasonic I believe. Mitsubishi is the other brand that have a good history. I don't know about any others, those are the two that stood out and I narrowed my search to back when I bought mine.
        "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

        https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

        https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1p...qcZKHyrqKhikFA

        ----

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        • #6
          Thanks for your input. I assume we agree that a portable unit is not a good option. Even the preferred 2 hose models are inefficient and don't last long.
          I presume from corrosion causing refrigerant leaks.

          I was hoping they made a tall but skinny window model with high cooling capacity.

          I would just change out the darn window but it's on the 2nd story gable end of house.

          I also see a lot of split system units these days.
          I'm starting to lean more in that direction.

          I'll do some investigation of if the factory lines are long enough to place the condenser unit on the ground and how hard it'll be to fish wiring through this big house.

          Regards, John

          Comment


          • #7
            You don't have to fish thru the walls if you're mounting the inside half on an exterior wall. There is just the one hole through the wall, at least that's all there is on my Sanyo units. The line sets usually come separate and you get the length you need. If you can place the outside unit near or under a second floor install you should be good with a 25 foot line set which can be shortened if need be. The lines are not pre-charged (again referring to my Sanyo units) so not an issue with shortening the tubing. You run the line set up the exterior of the wall and cover it with what looks like a downspout. Painted the same color as the house you barely see it. Many brands also offer recessed, ceiling mounted units that don't take up any wall space.
            "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

            https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

            https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1p...qcZKHyrqKhikFA

            ----

            Comment


            • #8
              https://www.pickhvac.com/window-air-...ment-vertical/

              you might find some help here. didn't read through it all myself.
              "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

              https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

              https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1p...qcZKHyrqKhikFA

              ----

              Comment


              • #9
                Another vote for looking at a mini-split for your situation.

                Originally posted by UTILITYMETERREPAIR View Post
                do more research on mini splits before you get one, they are still working out the bugs in them. i recently talked to a ac tech about them, he said they are getting better but still not at the reliability of central units.
                we have one at work thats been installed about 4 years and its had some kind of problem at least once per year where it stopped cooling, requiring a service tech. i love my window units at home, i can usually get 10 years out of one with no service calls required.
                Mini-splits have been around for quite a while, widely used especially outside of the US and quite reliable. Many of them are more advanced than the bigger split systems we have in the US. Many use EEVs for the expansion device as well as multiple sensors in the evaporator and condenser to optimize operation. They also typically have inverter driven variable speed compressors which are found on some of the newer higher end split systems. Also the lack of ducts means there is no duct loss which is why they can achieve higher SEER ratings than a conventional split system

                They are installed and charged a bit differently to the larger split systems so it is possible the reason for the belief that they have bugs is possibly incorrect install by some ac techs who may be treating them in the same way as conventional systems

                Comment


                • #10
                  Thanks guys, it's looking like a sound option.

                  I'm no hvac guy, but I do have my universal certification from nearly 20 years ago.
                  With my limited experience, I would rather just go with a pre charged unit with its preflaired 25ft lines as opposed to needing longer copper lines and having to buy and calculate the amount of refrigerant needed. I don't even know if I can buy R410 with that old 608u cert?

                  As a plan B, I'll install the unit and just hire a tech to charge it for me.

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    You may want to consider getting a heatpump if you may also need heating for that area in the winter.

                    I believe they come pre-charged but you may need to add refrigerant if the line set is longer than the amount it is charged for. That said you will need more if you need to have a lineset longer than the minimum amount. There is a base value and you cannot go shorter than that - you will just need to coil the excess lineset. You likely won't need more than a few oz if you do need more but you will need an accurate charging scale to weigh in the correct amount. You cannot charge these systems by superheat/subcool as you can with big split systems.

                    If you need to make flares you may want to hire an HVAC guy who knows how to do this. A common source of leaks is incorrectly made flares. You will also need the appropriate torque wrench torque wrench to tighten the flares. If you get a lineset which has pre-made flares then you should be fine.

                    You old 608 cert should be fine for purchasing 410A. Don't forget that 410A is a blend so you will need to charge as a liquid which means inverting the cylinder. If you need to charge through the vapor port (while the unit is running) you will need to use a throttling valve or manually throttling the flow using a manifold gauge set.

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                    • #12
                      Thanks blue_can. I can flair and do everything else,
                      I just don't want to mess with refrigerant other than pulling a vacuum before releasing the factory pre charge.
                      I want a quality brand like LG, Sanyo, or Mitsubishi... but I'm not sure if they come pre-charged like bs companies like Air-con, MrCool, or Blueridge.

                      I'll have to do some research on them.

                      Another thing I wonder about is if the heat-pump function is feasible in areas like Michigan where the winter temps can be sub-zero. The min outside temperature is listed @ 14F. Would it just stop heating if the outside temp dipped below that?

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                      • #13
                        I believe they all come pre-charged but you would need to check.

                        You are correct - heatpumps don't work well in low temps. They don't suddenly die but their capacity progressively goes down as it gets colder outside. They may have supplemental electric heat for this kinds of conditions. You can check the manual and specs to see if they offer supplemental heat for very low ambient conditions.

                        The manual/specs should have capacity tables for various outdoor conditions in heating mode - you can see how it is handled including the use of supplemental heat.

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