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  • What A/C unit is in your house

    Well we figured that out in the country with all the trees and nice breeze at night A/C would not be necessary, I still don't think it is but the wife can't take the heat. I guess pushing 90 indoors is getting a bit much so here is the question, what do you HVAC guys put in your own homes, we have a Trane XR 90 furnace and a VanEE H90 HRV. The house is a 1430 sqft brick raised bungalow all low E glass and very well sealed and insulated, the basement will be finished living space with R20 walls, there is R10 under the concrete pad



  • #2
    what is the unit above the sink?

    i have a amana ac and gas hot air heat . this unit has a stainless steel heat exchanger and the amana units are not to bad to work or install .

    i was going to go with a trane unit but the budget did not allow us to use this unit .so i had to go with 2nd best.
    Charlie

    My seek the peek fundraiser page
    http://observatory.mountwashington.o...nal&fr_id=1040


    http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.php

    new work pictures 12/09
    http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/

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    • #3
      Thanks Hawk, the unit above the sink is the HRV (Heat Recovery Ventilator)

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by wbrooks
        Well we figured that out in the country with all the trees and nice breeze at night A/C would not be necessary, I still don't think it is but the wife can't take the heat.
        Wayne,
        just wait till YOU start getting those hot flashes!
        Phil
        Tools Rule

        Comment


        • #5
          Trane! What else? Other people sell garbage. But I'm not puting it in my house. I'm the freandly Trane salesman. Bob

          Comment


          • #6
            Trane commercial rooftop heat pump mounted on a pad behind the house. I have no basement or crawl space, so my ducting goes between the floors of my modified split-level (the portion normally 6 steps down is only one, and the upper portion is 11 steps up...) The ducting and return come down a chase and out the back of the house and the old Carrier used to be on the patio. When I got a new heat pump I moved it off of the patio onto a pad, so I could add a sunroom where the patio used to be.

            It still seems weird to pump perfectly good warm air *outside* in the winter to heat it up again.
            Steve
            www.MorrisGarage.com

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Robert Luland
              Trane! What else? Other people sell garbage. But I'm not puting it in my house. I'm the friendly Trane salesman. Bob

              trane units are very good but didn't American standard bye trane ,and how long before the trane name is no more .
              Charlie

              My seek the peek fundraiser page
              http://observatory.mountwashington.o...nal&fr_id=1040


              http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.php

              new work pictures 12/09
              http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/

              Comment


              • #8
                New home A/C installation

                Any observations here regarding Carrier units? Reliability, servicibility, functionality? Primary home heating is gas hot water through radiators which were zoned into 4 zones two years ago so no plans to go with hot air heat, although I prefer it to radiators. Any do's and dont's comments reagrding what a conrtractor might propose would also be appreciated.
                there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  We have a Tempstar furnace and A/C unit in the house we recently purchased. The Furnace is about 18 years old and the local Tempstar dealer is recommending we replace it.

                  Does anyone here have experience with this brand? I don't see a lot of information about the company or the quality.

                  Thanks in advance,

                  CWS

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    CWS, unless things have changed since I sold Tempstar units, they are a subsiduary of Heil. Only difference between the Heil Line and the Tempstar Line back then was the nameplate, everything inside was the same.
                    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      CWS

                      if the unit lasted 18 yrs and still runs ,then I'd say that's a good unit.

                      to replace it now you can get a more efficient unit .
                      Charlie

                      My seek the peek fundraiser page
                      http://observatory.mountwashington.o...nal&fr_id=1040


                      http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.php

                      new work pictures 12/09
                      http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks to you both for the quick response.

                        Dave,

                        So, being rather ignorant about the modern state of such things, how does the "Heil" rank with such names as Trane, Bryant, and the others that I see "nationally" advertised? (I fully realize that "advertisement" is by no mean a mark of quality and longevity!)

                        Thanks,

                        CWS

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          CWS, IMO Tempstar ranks right up there with those other mfgs. you mentioned. My Tempstar AC unit has been going strong now for over 16 years. The only service call I've ever had on it was to replace some wiring that mice got at. Other than that is run perfectly. My only regret is due to its age it's not as energy efficient as todays models are.
                          Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Dave,

                            Thanks so much. I'm making an appointment for the local Tempstar dealer to come over for a serious discussion and estimate. I had a new Trane system put into my current home, about a year and a half ago. It's okay, but it's noisey and frankly after one full winter and two springs, I haven't seen any savings in "cubic ft. used", over the very old (about 50 years) Pennsylvania Furnace with it's huge cast iron exchanger and 20-inch squirrel-cage fan. The house doesn't seem nearly as warm either.

                            So, with the home in Binghamton, which we purchased late last year, we've been doing a massive amount of work. We were going to wait until next year to put in a new furnace, ducting, registers, etc., and then upgrade the floors. But with the recent heavy rains and flooding in the surrounding areas we discovered a new problem.

                            When they installed the A/C (about five or six years ago), they had to dig under the furnace to lower it enough to mount the exchanger on top. This allowed water to come in, up under the furnace and we ended up with a couple of inches of water that ruined the basement carpet, and doors. The sump kept it from going any higher, but I think now is the time to look at a more compact heating unit, adding better drains and upgrading the sump, rather than putting it off to after we move in. This house was originally built in 1887 and is in a great old neighborhood. Unfortunately, it is also proving to be a money pit as we upgrade the kitchen, bathrooms, plumbing, electrical systems and restore some of the "niceties" that previous owners had stripped out in their quest for modernizing. (Putting back crown and top moldings, refinishing the oak woodwork, new panel doors, etc.)

                            Thanks again,

                            CWS

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              cws

                              if you do not have enough hight to fit the unit you can get a horizontal unit.

                              i put a amana in my house ,it is very quiet and i run the fan all the time when the house is closed up .
                              this is a 98 percent unit.
                              Last edited by HVAC HAWK; 07-07-2006, 10:17 PM.
                              Charlie

                              My seek the peek fundraiser page
                              http://observatory.mountwashington.o...nal&fr_id=1040


                              http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.php

                              new work pictures 12/09
                              http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/

                              Comment

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