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Condensation on basement sheetrock walls

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  • Condensation on basement sheetrock walls

    I finished a room in my basement in a hurry because we had someone coming to live with that needed a room. The room has two outside walls, and is located on the lowest basement leel of the house. The walls are 2x4 framed above the block, insulated, covered in poly, then sheetrock and paint. I tapped off the main heat duct and put a vent low in one inside wall. Here's the problem (I think) I didn't install a cold-air return... I'm getting water streaks in the paint starting at ceiling level that I've deduced are caused by condensation because there's no return air path... am I right about this!? I've puzzled for the longest time about this!
    Last edited by otter; 07-09-2006, 09:16 PM.

  • #2
    i thought you said you had a water leak after the sprinkler vac. breaker

    glad you got the issue fixed.

    rick.
    phoebe it is

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    • #3
      The leak was right after the shut-off for the vac. breaker, so it doesn't leak when it's shut-off right before the breaker.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by otter
        I tapped off the main heat duct and put a vent low in one inside wall. Here's the problem (I think) I didn't install a cold-air return... I'm getting water streaks in the paint starting at ceiling level that I've deduced are caused by condensation because there's no return air path... am I right about this!? I've puzzled for the longest time about this!
        is this low vent for heat only ? if it is then the vent should be high and a return to be low .and if it is ac then yo need a high return .

        is it damp in the basement ?

        where is the air handler ?
        Charlie

        My seek the peek fundraiser page
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        http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/

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        • #5
          The same vent is for ac and heat. The air handler is about 15' away from the new vent. The basement doesn't seem to be the slightest bit damp. I have a dimpled plastic membrane waterproofing system that is supposed to block 100% of moisture from your basement. It seems to work, we had floods in the spring and all of the neighbos basements got flooded, and mine didn't and I don't even have a sump pump. Thanks

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          • #6
            OTTER: It's that Crows Nest bar on the main drag that's causing the problem!!

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            • #7
              That's funny! Crow's Nest is long gone, it's been 5 different places since then. The current incarnation is called Finn's Place.

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              • #8
                Also, the main drag is pretty much the only drag... we don't even have a stoplight!

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                • #9
                  A cold air return will help the air move if you are running A/C. You need to keep the air circulating. I was in a neighbours basement last weekend and the moisture was dripping down the inside of his vapour barrier, he has no A/C but runs a dehumidifier. The basement was done to code with tar paper on the outside poured walls then 2X4 walls with R12 insulation and 6 mil vapour barrier tuck taped and all. I believe the problem here is the extreme heat and humidity -- 110° + with the humidity factored in 95°+ real temp. So cold meets hot at the vapour barrier in this case and in yours the cold hot boundary my be the drywall. Another possibility is that if the A/C is cranked and it is really cold in the basement there is a good chance you are close to the dew point and that is creating the dampness.
                  Try fans to get the air circulating and see what happens

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