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  • Any welders on the forum?

    I put this under pipe joining as I know certain types of pipe joining are welded/brazed depending on the commercial/industrial application.


    The creation of my second business is bringing back to me a first love that I had back in high school, to become a welder. I'm fascinated with the art and took schooling back in the day as I found it very useful. Years of growing up seeing broken equipment that dad absolutely refused to fix......employed my school of thought to learn.


    Well, given financial constraints along with the inability to sink too much money into fabricating an event truck and equipment.....I took it upon myself to buy my own equipment and hire a welder to do the majority of the fabrication. Me on the other hand I'm sticking to the administrative tasks until this major hurdle with the truck is completed.

    From that point on though......I'm finally, finally getting the opportunity to put my hands on equipment that wasn't the cheapest buy at harbor freight.

    For those who know welding equipment, I bought a Hobart 250 Iron man mig welder, Syncrowave 200 Tig Welder, Cutting torches and tanks, numerous other small items relating to dealing with metal fabrication.


    Absolutely love it......with the exception of slag burns and sparks from torching metal or running the mig. That stinging feeling that feels so uncomfortable that your body doesn't comprehend the pain correctly. I'm wearing protective clothing but it still happens.

    A good plasma cutter is in view if the replacement of tanks gets out of hand.

    The settings on the iron man 250 is fantastic and I first tried flux-core which was a joke in the mess it created. Went with gas and the welds look so good it looks like a tig welder put it down.

    I can run the mig with no problems.....got an arc welder that will never see use I imagine. The tig welder I have absolutely no experience with and I know there's a learning curve to its use.

    The objective once the parade truck is done is to become a full fledged welding shop to get equipment built, produce items not seen in the market. Some of this involves aluminum for weight reasons so I have to learn how to do this.....the ability to do 3 things at once. Being that its the coldest weld out there.......I look forward to saying someday soon that I can honestly tig weld aluminum.

    I thought about buying a spool gun for my mig welder to run aluminum but I've tried that...........gotta be amazingly accurate and know your heat in order to lay a good bead with aluminum. An awesome skill in my opinion.....just like the rest of the metal bonding processes.


    SO....anyone have anything to share.....would love to hear it. I hope this on the job training gives me some skills that I always wanted to perfect and say that I could do it......I miss that profession.

    When I went into the warehouse that supplies steel for me, I was like a kid in a candy shop; any sheet of metal or tubing, rod or c-bar......I was thinking how awesome it would be to have the ability to use as I please in a place like that......


    I'd be building stuff for no reason....just having fun at what I do. A great deal of satisfaction goes into welding and fabricating.......hats off to you guys who do it for a living. It's hot heavy and hard work....but is enjoyable when you get your niche.

    I believe I got 4 months education and 3 months on the job training before I was laid off for breaking a $1400 die that was 14' long....bending up a 20" piece of steel. Didn't set my stops correctly and all of a sudden it sounds like a semi-truck falling through the ceiling, KA-BOOOM!!! go hand in your uniform rookie......your day is done.

    FYI,

    They cut that die to 11'......so it wasn't a total loss!


    Yer FIRED!!!!
    Northern Kentucky Plumbers Twitter Feed | Plumbing Videos

  • #2
    Re: Any welders on the forum?

    toolaholic is your go to guy on this.

    i only dabble with my welders and plasma cutter. still looking to get an inverter tig like the miller.

    rick.
    phoebe it is

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Any welders on the forum?

      well, now that you have a stick welder,
      .....got an arc welder that will never see use I imagine.
      you can use it to make well extensions that'll never rot, instead of using the clamp-ons!
      http://www.refined-home.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Any welders on the forum?

        I only use stick to weld pipe....

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Any welders on the forum?

          I am not a "pro" welder, even tho I have been payed a number of times to weld things up for people, my son worked as a pro welder for a few years, building tanks and truck bodies, and other projects, he is a good welder, I can do OK, but when some one is welding up thousands of pounds of rod they hopefully are better than some one who only burns up a few hundred pounds a year.
          He is a artist with a torch, I can cut iron but I like to have a guide tho.

          currently I am building a backhoe for my tractor and rebuilt the loader for it last winter, cut it apart and adapted it to the newer tractor, I have fabricated many tools and pieces of equipment. (also building a bale trailer to haul in bales with, to days project.)

          I bought my son a Hobart wire feed welder the small one, and he likes it, (I did use a wire feed I think nearly one of the first made nearly 40 years ago, but did not really acquire the hang of using it again), I can stick weld most things that is what I learned with ( 45 or so years ago), my welder is not fancy jsut a old century welder with a DC converter, I would like to get a commercial unit, some day,
          have a few cutting torches, and a small machine shop, couple of lathes and old Bridgeport mill,

          It sounds like you have more toys than I do when it comes to welding it self.

          here is the picture of the loader I rebuilt, and mounted on the newer tractor, I have it painted now, had to cut it all apart and shorten the arms new mounting system, and hydraulics.

          Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
          attributed to Samuel Johnson
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Any welders on the forum?

            Originally posted by DUNBAR View Post
            I put this under pipe joining as I know certain types of pipe joining are welded/brazed depending on the commercial/industrial application.


            The creation of my second business is bringing back to me a first love that I had back in high school, to become a welder. I'm fascinated with the art and took schooling back in the day as I found it very useful. Years of growing up seeing broken equipment that dad absolutely refused to fix......employed my school of thought to learn.


            Well, given financial constraints along with the inability to sink too much money into fabricating an event truck and equipment.....I took it upon myself to buy my own equipment and hire a welder to do the majority of the fabrication. Me on the other hand I'm sticking to the administrative tasks until this major hurdle with the truck is completed.

            From that point on though......I'm finally, finally getting the opportunity to put my hands on equipment that wasn't the cheapest buy at harbor freight.

            For those who know welding equipment, I bought a Hobart 250 Iron man mig welder, Syncrowave 200 Tig Welder, Cutting torches and tanks, numerous other small items relating to dealing with metal fabrication.


            Absolutely love it......with the exception of slag burns and sparks from torching metal or running the mig. That stinging feeling that feels so uncomfortable that your body doesn't comprehend the pain correctly. I'm wearing protective clothing but it still happens.

            A good plasma cutter is in view if the replacement of tanks gets out of hand.

            The settings on the iron man 250 is fantastic and I first tried flux-core which was a joke in the mess it created. Went with gas and the welds look so good it looks like a tig welder put it down.

            I can run the mig with no problems.....got an arc welder that will never see use I imagine. The tig welder I have absolutely no experience with and I know there's a learning curve to its use.

            The objective once the parade truck is done is to become a full fledged welding shop to get equipment built, produce items not seen in the market. Some of this involves aluminum for weight reasons so I have to learn how to do this.....the ability to do 3 things at once. Being that its the coldest weld out there.......I look forward to saying someday soon that I can honestly tig weld aluminum.

            I thought about buying a spool gun for my mig welder to run aluminum but I've tried that...........gotta be amazingly accurate and know your heat in order to lay a good bead with aluminum. An awesome skill in my opinion.....just like the rest of the metal bonding processes.


            SO....anyone have anything to share.....would love to hear it. I hope this on the job training gives me some skills that I always wanted to perfect and say that I could do it......I miss that profession.

            When I went into the warehouse that supplies steel for me, I was like a kid in a candy shop; any sheet of metal or tubing, rod or c-bar......I was thinking how awesome it would be to have the ability to use as I please in a place like that......


            I'd be building stuff for no reason....just having fun at what I do. A great deal of satisfaction goes into welding and fabricating.......hats off to you guys who do it for a living. It's hot heavy and hard work....but is enjoyable when you get your niche.

            I believe I got 4 months education and 3 months on the job training before I was laid off for breaking a $1400 die that was 14' long....bending up a 20" piece of steel. Didn't set my stops correctly and all of a sudden it sounds like a semi-truck falling through the ceiling, KA-BOOOM!!! go hand in your uniform rookie......your day is done.

            FYI,

            They cut that die to 11'......so it wasn't a total loss!


            Yer FIRED!!!!
            As part of the state mandated competencies for plumbers and hvac technicians a certain amoung of welding skill is required, so I am lucky enough to have mig, tig, gas, arc and plasma in the shop. It's great fun to weld and burn metal.
            sigpic

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Any welders on the forum?

              We Stick or Tig pipe its all about what it is and whats in it. I have seen it Mig but we are not going to go there. The Tig that I have seen was in power house work or in labs. If I was you I would get good with stick its about 90% of what you will do. Learn how to do your up hand and down hand pass,Learn to read the puddle. If you look on youtube you can see a few of my 638 steamfitter brothers wleding. To me it the greatest feeling in the world welding.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Any welders on the forum?

                Please educate me...

                I know NOTHING about welding but I find myself staring straiight into the light when I work around a welder. Like a moth to a flame.

                Please explain the difference between Mig, Tig, Stick...others? applications and advantages to either.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Any welders on the forum?

                  I would also like to learn more about welding, if someone doesn't mind sharing.
                  Proud To Be Union!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Any welders on the forum?

                    Honestly I've never done tig or mig,and I'm no full time welder..but for low carbon steel pipe,its all stick or SMAW(shielded metal arc welding ..aka..stick).

                    Miller has a lot of information on their site,millerwelds.com...Theres a ton of info and idon't type so good..

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Any welders on the forum?

                      MIG, Gas metal arc welding mig welding , wire feed, there is a spool of wire that goes to a gun that has inert gas for shielding for the arc and puddle, when welding,

                      TIG tungsten inert gas, basically a way of making a arc to weld with, used for Aluminium and stainless steel and some other alloys, and a filler rod is used. (some what similar to gas welding).

                      stick is what is where a rod with "flux" is on the out side of the rod, and a ARC is used to burn the rod, melting the base material and the rod fusing the materials together, there are exceptions to this in hard surfacing, nickel and some others, some of these flow on the surface similar to brazing or hard soldering, the "flux" burns creating a pocket void of oxygen, to protect the materials being welded,

                      there are many types of rods and formulas, different tensile strengths, and fluxes,

                      ARC welding there are a number of different types, AC, DC, straight and DC reversed,

                      AC basically will put heat on the rod and base equally, on DC you get 1/3 and 2/3 and depending on the polarity it will be hotter on the rod or the base,

                      TIG usually uses a High frequency over lay, that keeps the arc more stable, and allows it to jump with out striking the rod,

                      Gas welding is where one uses Oxygen and normally acetylene, for the fuel gas, (propane does not work), any way one uses the flame that heats up the metal and melts it and one either adds a rod into the puddle or jsut flows the base materials together.

                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

                      Cutting torch, uses a fuel gas and Oxygen, to "preheat" the metal to be cut, (usually ferrous) and when the temperature is correct, one opens up a stream of Oxygen and the oxygen flow cuts the steel.

                      Plasma cutter uses a special arc and compressed air to cut steel,

                      there is what is called a carbon arc, uses a carbon stick and a arc welder, and compressed air to blow the melted metal out of the way, usually used for gouging and cutting welds,

                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

                      the basic of welding is using a heat source to melt a puddle and then using some type of filler rod to fill in the puddle area, and a "shield" to keep oxidation and contaminants out of the melted materials.

                      to make a good weld there may be movements to guide the "arc" or heat source, to create a puddle (small pool of melted material), and the filler, (rod, wire, other), is used to build that melted section which forms a bead,

                      There are a number of things that needed to know, the thickness, of the materials, to be welded, to make choice of heat (normally amps) but may be voltage and speed in wire feed, (mig), rod size, or wire size, and then the type of rod or filler materials to use.

                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

                      IN my Opinion the easiest way to learn how to weld is to have some one basically set up for you and then get a pile of scrap or cut off ends and start to weld, and have some one give you some tips as you go, most will find mig easier than other types of welding.

                      get a basic book on "how to weld" or read up on the net, and it will give one some back ground information, and some guidelines, and some how to.

                      once one figures out how to make or lay a bead, then experiment on different thickness and angles of welding, Flat, vertical, horizontal, over head,

                      read up on the rod one wants to use, to see if they met the needs, most commercial welding is mig or DC welding, AC is usually a Home or DIY welder, NOT saying that is a bad welder, but there are some limited choices in rod and heat and how it welds.
                      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                      attributed to Samuel Johnson
                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Any welders on the forum?

                        the trade is full of it.solvent welding, soldering, brazing,fusion,smaw,mig, tig,if your in the pipe trades,chances are your doing it on a daily basis. the same basic methodology applies.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Any welders on the forum?

                          Sure wish You were closer, Dunbar. I was a certified welder with the Pile Bucks Local 34 Oakland Ca. Papers were plate,all position ,stick and wire feed. I welded a lot of 1 1/2"
                          thick flange x 3' I beams. Day in day out ,gets hot with leathers and 90 deg. heat. I have a portable lincoln. Shop Buss. box and a miller 210 mig . C-25 bottle for mild steel. Argon for allum.,and tri gas for stainless. Never tiged,would like to. I have a hypertherm 600 power max plasma cutter. Soo much fun doing art. I will send You some paper templates of cats.
                          Wife works for Pixar,Disney. These 2 cats were done by a great artist for Me. Please join us over at weld talk. Great bunch of folks. I always learn, and teach there. We have welders that worked on Nasa projects,sub hulls ,You name it. I have tons of steel. Now You'll be a dumpster diver. Any help I can give ,Let Me know .Also ,PM Me and I'll give You My phone #
                          I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Any welders on the forum?

                            Hey there P-Crack,
                            First off, please, please, do not stare into the light. Arc eye, or "getting flashed," will not make your day. Your eyes will itch, water, turn red, and in the middle of the night you will wake up thinking someone has thrown a handful of sand into your eyes. Best remedy is a fresh potato cut in half and placed directly onto the eyes. I know it sounds wierd, but it works. And you can get flashed by looking at someone welding from as far away as across the street. So don't stare into the light, although I certainly know the attraction.
                            I will take a stab at your question, and then if I miss something, you or anyone else (Aaron), ask away because if there is one thing that is important is to share info when people show an interest. I wish some of you lived closer, as there is nothing like a hands-on demonstration under the hood to really get a person interested. Kind of like seeing photos develop in a darkroom tray full of chemicals the first time, the WOW factor is unbelievable.

                            Four kinds of welding that most of you have probably heard of and I'll touch on those but there are MANY different kinds of welding and variations on same, stuff like friction stir welding, Submerged Arc Welding (not underwater welding, just the arc is submerged under a thick layer of flux,) and plasma-mig, which even my welding instructor found hard to believe until I showed him my textbook.
                            1. Oxy-acetylene (acetylene torch) welding. Also known as gas welding. Uses two cylinders (oxygen and acetylene) to create a flame, high temp, with a welding (not cutting) tip. Filler rod (old timers used to use high-nickel content clotheshangers) is fed into the flame creating a puddle (molten metal) in order to do the weld. Most airplanes from WWI and WWII were gas welded together. You can weld steels, stainless, aluminum, just about anything with OA. What can't be welded with OA, can be "brazed" together with OA and brazing rods and flux.
                            2. Stick welding (formally known as Shielded Metal Arc Welding SMAW). Typically the red Lincoln Tombstone welders (also known as a "buzz box") that grampa Orville had in his garage. Still very popular. Uses a welding rod with a coating on it called flux. Arc is struck by scratching (like a match) the rod on the base metal to start an arc. Travel from left to right with rod decreasing in length as it burns off. Flux keeps our surrounding (and corrosive) atmosphere at bay while welding thereby maintaining the properties of the weld from being contaminated. Flux becomes slag as it cools, and this slag is then chipped off with a welding hammer to expose the protected and now cooled weldment beneath.
                            3. MIG welding (Metal Inert Gas, or GMAW, Gas Metal Arc Welding, or GSMAW Gas Shielded Metal Arc Welding.) Think hot glue gun here, (which is dangerous cause you really don't lay the bead on top like you do with a hot glue gun), but the MIG gun reminds one of that. Wire feeds out of the nozzle of the gun. The wire takes the place of the rod mentioned above. Wire is protected via an atmosphere of an inert gas (usually CO2, but could be Argon, Helium, or Nitrogen, depending upon the base metal and what is being welded.) The gas surrounds the tip of the MIG gun when you pull the trigger and start the arc. MIG may incorporate spray transfer or short circuit transfer. For brevity sake, spray transfer is usually a lot higher current and a little different gas. You can do steels, stainless, and aluminum with MIG.
                            3 a. Fluxcored welding (FCAW for Flux Cored Arc Weld) is simply a variation on MIG, but it is not MIG. Fluxcored welding feeds a wire thru a gun, but the wire is hollow in its core and is filled with flux inside, which provides the shielding. No shielding gas from a tank is used here. (Unless you're looking at a commercial process called Dual-Shield which uses both a fluxcored wire AND an externally available shielding gas. Welding done with MIG does not have to have slag removed cause there is none. The gas took the place of the flux. When it cools, you see the weld immediately. Flux cored has to be freshed up a little with either a wire brush or a little bit of chipping with a hammer because it does use flux.
                            4. TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas, also known as Heli-Arc welding because the process used an arc and helium as the inert gas.) TIG uses the fancy looking little torch that you hold in your hand a lot like a pencil. The torch has a tungsten rod that helps the electrical arc flow to the workpiece. Shielding gas (helium, or argon, mostly now an argon mix) is fed through the torch to create the shielding atmosphere where the welding takes place. The filler rod is held in the left hand, the torch in the right hand. Your foot controls a pedal connected to the machine which, when depressed, starts the current flowing and gets the arc started. The harder you press on the pedal, the more current, the hotter the arc. The tungsten in the TIG torch is never supposed to touch the metal you are welding nor should it touch the filler metal being fed in with your left hand. Either will contaminate the weldment with tungsten which will make it brittle. No chipping is needed with TIG.

                            TIG is used a lot for aluminum welding, (incorporating AC current). You can weld steel, aluminum, stainless, magnesium, and just about any of your exotic metals with TIG. TIG is the purest form of welding and results in the cleanest and nicest looking welds. It is, however, the slowest of the processes. And many compare TIG welding to the manipulation and process of OA described above. The TIG torch is just substituted for the OA torch head. Wire feed is the same. Of the four listed so far, MIG is by far the fastest and easiest to learn, but you should learn stick first so you understand the process. Stick is pretty easy to learn too, and most guys can be taught in an evening or less to lay a nice looking bead with a buzz box. Stick is slower than MIG, but a lot faster than TIG. TIG is the toughest to learn and takes great patience, lots and lots of practice, and the ability to swallow your pride when somebody looks at it and critiques it. It is very demanding, but a very good process when done in the hands of a pro. OA is about the same speed as TIG because they're so closely related, one using a flame, and one using an electrical current to produce the arc or "flame."
                            And within all that is a host of variables like different welding rods, (6011, 6013, 7018, etc, for stick,) different filler rods for TIG (aluminum or steel or stainless), and different wires and thicknesses of wire for the MIG and flux cored processes.
                            To be a good welder, one must have some electrical knowledge, some understanding of metallurgy, a steady hand (or hands for TIG), a good understanding of fabrication and fit-up, and a lot of patience.
                            Safety equipment is key to any and every process. You MUST cover up all exposed skin with any arc welding process. And you must wear a full coverage welding helmet. OA is the only process where you can wear the welder's goggles that just protect the eyes. You still need gloves, but you don't have to worry about the UV radiation like you do with any electric arc process. Gloves need to cover hands and have enough length to cover the exposed area between the top of the glove and the shirt sleeve at the wrist. Necks need to be covered too, or you end up with Ruby Throat. Welders wear a goofy looking little hat with a short bill on it. The hat is worn backwards with the bill sticking out to protect the back of the neck from having dripping slag or molten metal beads raining down the back of your head if doing overhead welding. When pipe line welding, the brim is worn to cover the side of the head closest to the pipe as you go around the joint.
                            Welding is hot, and gets hotter as you work on a big piece and have all that weldment area heated up. MIG and TIG are pretty clean processes, but anything with flux or flux cored wire gets smokey and a little dirtier. If you want to learn welding, check out a technical college or technical school and take a class or two. It is much easier than teaching yourself. Hobart Welding has an excellent school, but it is a bit pricey. No matter where you learn or how, learn the safety precautions necessary to keep yourself and others safe. You need to have a charged garden hose nearby along with a five gallon pail of water and a fire extinquisher. Do not use a woodworking shop as a dual shop with welding going on too unless you are meticulous about picking up all the sawdust and scraps before you start welding. Fires are easily started with any and all welding processes. And never, ever, ever weld on a closed container, or on a gasoline tank or a propane tank or any other structure that has held a flammable liquid or gas. Way too many welders have died doing that. It can be done, but the tank has to be cleaned and purged and filled with an inert gas before welding on it and that kind of thing has to be left to the pros. Even welding near a gas tank on a car can result in catastrophe.
                            I apologize for the length of the post. But, if you actually did get this far and don't understand something, or have more questions, ask away. I'll try to answer, but I don't guarantee I'll have the answer.
                            Hope this helps all.
                            Jim Don

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Any welders on the forum?

                              Been 3 days, We showed up! No Dunbar,Guess I'll roll up My leads and head home.
                              I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

                              Comment

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