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  • Ridgid Propress Question

    I am thinking of buying a Ridgid Propress tool. I am wanting to use it to run water lines and air lines in a new shop. How much pressure are these copper crimped fittings good for. The air lines that I am wanting to run might have up to 175 PSI on them but I still would want a safety factor above that. I would guess that you just use the normal copper pipe with these fittings. If not please advise me other wise. Will these Propress fitting work under those kind of pressures. Thank you in advance for responding.

    Dave

  • #2
    Re: Ridgid Propress Question

    Soon Rick will respond...just wait....

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Ridgid Propress Question

      Propress for the water no problem but the fittings carry a 200 psi rating with testing up to 600 lbs. Why not just sweat the fittings instead of this pricey tool? Unless you plan to use it a lot?
      Seattle Drain Service

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      • #4
        Re: Ridgid Propress Question

        Thank you for your reply. Yes my original plan was to sweat the fittings. I also have my own pipe threading machine and could use black pipe. The reason I was considering the propress tool was ease of doing the job and that could be worth a lot up near the ceiling 16 to 18 feet. Plus I wouldn't have to worry about scorching the white paint on the metal that is on the inside of the shop which is 60 X 60 feet. I am also considering a product called Trans air pipe that is aluminum and just snaps together and is supposed to be cheaper than black pipe or copper and should take less time to install. I am looking at all the options I can. Thank you again for you post I will will consider it. If you or anyone else knows any thing about the Trans Air piping system or wants to shed any more light on the Propress option I would appreciate it. Thank you again. Dave

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        • #5
          Re: Ridgid Propress Question

          I read about the trans air pipe system looked good. Cost was up there I thought but I read nothing but good reviews.
          Seattle Drain Service

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          • #6
            Re: Ridgid Propress Question

            Also I am considering doing my new shop in pex. There are pluses and negatives. Plastic pipe in a fire will let the air out and could fan the flames not good. But I am not afraid of flying plastic from pex like I am of pvc if it where to split. I don't run my air all the time I turn it off when not in the shop. So Pex is probably what I will try. I heard a different color pex was coming out that was yellow just for air lines but have not seen it yet.
            Seattle Drain Service

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Ridgid Propress Question

              This is off of Viega's website:

              Viega FostaPEX
              Fosta stands for Form-Stable PEX, so the piping will keep its shape after it is bent. The flexibility of the PEX and the form stability of the rigid aluminum outer coating are combined to make Viega FostaPEX ideal for plumbers and homeowners wanting a professional looking installation. It is perfect for potable water systems, radiant heating systems, station and manifold connections as well as radiator or baseboard connections. For convenience, Viega FostaPEX is available in two colors, red or silver and can be easily color coded for identification of hot water lines if so desired.

              Regular PEX seems like it would be difficult to arrange in nice straight, neat pipe runs. This FostaPEX has some rigidity so it should look neater when doing exposed work. I don't know if the aluminum coating affects PEX' rating to UV exposure or not.

              I used a Trans Air piping system for my garage and basement shop air. I used commercial sized pipe (7/8") which gives a rating of 232 psi max. pressure at 88 CFM. I got all the pipe, 10 9' sections, fittings, couplings, hangers and a vibration isolator for about $750. It took me about 4 hours to install it and have it up and running. I made a measured diagram showing where I wanted my air connections for air tools so I could order an adequate length of pipe and the correct fittings. It's not like you can run down to the corner hardware store and get an extra 90ยบ or two.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Ridgid Propress Question

                Thank you Cuda and Killavolt for you helpfull replys.

                I am sort of leaning toward the Trans air system at this time. I will have to talk with them and get prices etc.

                The post of Cuda's reminded me that I have been considering pex to use for the water lines to the bath to be installed in the new shop in the future. We used pex or some type of it in the infloor heating that we already have in the shop. This was supplied by the contractor that installed the heating system and I don't at this time remember the brand of the pex tubing. There is just under 4000 feet of it in the floor. We are heating it with a Water Furnace heat pump (6 ton). We are gravity feeding water from my old spring house into a outside 3 foot square structure that is appox. 9 foot deep with around 4 feet of water in it. We have copper coils in it that the 140 freon goes through and is used to extract the heat from the 55 degree water to make the heat via the heat pump to heat the shop. I know this is a little off the orginal post but I though that someone might be interested in it. Again thanks for the post, I am still exploring all options for the air distribution lines.

                Dave

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                • #9
                  Re: Ridgid Propress Question

                  propress is designed for compressed air with less tha 25mg/m3 oil content, 0-250 degf ambient. 200 psi max. any of the 3 o-rings can be used.

                  they are the epdm( water ,shiney balck), fkm (dull black), and hnbr(gas/ yellow)

                  with over 25 mg/m3 oil content, the epdm o-ring is not approved.

                  nothing wrong with propress. but unless you are doing more than just your shop air, you'll have a tool that is just sitting.

                  can you rent?

                  rick.
                  phoebe it is

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                  • #10
                    Re: Ridgid Propress Question

                    Plumber Rick:

                    Thank you for your helpful post.

                    The problem with me renting is that with me working two jobs is that I have limited time to work on shop projects. I find that I usually can find tools that I can buy and use and then resell and make out better than if I were to rent. The advice on the orings and pressures is very helpful.

                    Dave

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                    • #11
                      Re: Ridgid Propress Question

                      nothing wrong with buying i have 5

                      what if you fabbed all the pipe and fittings, then came back with a tool and in a matter of minutes, you could press all the fittings.

                      it only takes 4-6 seconds a crimp.

                      make sure to use a marker/ sharpie to mark the insert depth so it's all in place. properly support all the pipe and fittings and you can crimp anytime thereafter.

                      now if you do buy, there will be plenty here to buy it off of you when you're done.

                      rick.
                      phoebe it is

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                      • #12
                        Re: Ridgid Propress Question

                        Here's probably a dumb question:

                        Are water pressure ratings equal to air pressure ratings?

                        J.C.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Ridgid Propress Question

                          PRESSURE IS PRESSURE ...Thats how a little guy beats a big guy arm wrestling

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                          • #14
                            Re: Ridgid Propress Question

                            Thanks Delcase. So 200 PSI of water pressure is equal to 200 psi of air pressure as far as the joint's leak rating?

                            Wanna' make sure I understand.

                            J.C.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Ridgid Propress Question

                              From my reading, ProPress G fittings are rated for 125 psi and compressed air is not listed as a use.

                              Don't see why it wouldn't work though as long as you stayed below the psi threshold.

                              J.C.

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