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  • Grooved fittings

    When using grooved pipe connections ( Like victaulic ) how much space is allowed between the 2 pipe ends under the rubber gasket? Is it better to have the pipes ends touching?

  • #2
    Re: Grooved fittings

    Originally posted by jebj1 View Post
    When using grooved pipe connections ( Like victaulic ) how much space is allowed between the 2 pipe ends under the rubber gasket? Is it better to have the pipes ends touching?
    You don't understand how the mechanics of how this type of connection works. Study the fittings and end preps of the pipe some more and you will know it better than if we were to explain it to you.
    ---------------
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    • #3
      Re: Grooved fittings

      Here you go,
      http://www.victaulic.com/Docs/animations/ClampWS.wmv

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      • #4
        Re: Grooved fittings

        If you are asking for a measurement on take out for the couplings, fittings, flanges or valves....................that would be none.

        It depends on what kind of grooved couplings you are using, in the video you posted those are zero-flex or ridgid type couplings. With the groove depth proper, when you tighten up the bolts, the contact pads actually make the coupling halves offset sideways jamming in the groove itself preventing the pipe and fitting from moving. There is also a flexible coupling made that will allow some movement and the fitting to rotate.

        I always measure from the end of the pipe to end of fitting to end of valve to face of flange or what ever you are connecting to.

        Hope this helps

        G3

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        • #5
          Re: Grooved fittings

          Yes, I'm talking about the take out. Let's say for argument's sake, I'm connecting two 10 foot lenghts of pipe. I'm guessing there would be a slight gap under the coupling, let's say 1/16 Inch. So my total pipe lentgh would be 20 feet and 1/16 inch when I'm done. Then for each coupling installed I'd have to add in 1/16 inch to my total lenght. Hope this make sense

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          • #6
            Re: Grooved fittings

            If you are fitting pipe with that close of a tolerance, you must be working an a space ship some where. 1/16" is not much to worry with. If you are laying a long pipe line you will need expansion/contraction joints anyway.

            What size pipe are you running and what is in it?

            Just cutting pipe with wheeled cutters will leave a 1/16" burr on the end.

            I would not worry about it.

            G3

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            • #7
              Re: Grooved fittings

              1/16 was just a number in my example. My real scenario is working with 3 inch pipe. I have to remove a section and install an alarm check valve for a sprinkler system. So i need to know how much space these couplings take up so I can get everything to fit back into the space.

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              • #8
                Re: Grooved fittings

                Not trying to be a smart @ss or nothing but this sounds like the first time you have messed with any grooved fittings, and your title says you are in fire protection???? The company you are working for should have someone that knows what is going on.

                As far as take out, just measure from end to end of the alarm valve, cut out that section of pipe and groove it, put your rubbers on, slide it in place, couple it together, and trim out you alarm valve. Is there a control valve before the alarm check?

                Couple of quick questions................

                1. How are you planning on cutting the pipe?

                2. How are you planning on grooving the pipe? (is it sch 40 or sch 10)

                3. Is the alarm check G x G or Flg X g

                I hope you have someone that knows what they are doing when you take this out of service. Got any pics?

                G3

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                • #9
                  Re: Grooved fittings

                  I can understand your concern. This is my first time working with grooved couplings. I own the company. We normally work on fire extinguishers and kitchen fire suppression systems.(Ansul systems ) We do a lot of sprinkler inspection, testing, maintenance, etc. This is the first time installing an alarm valve. It's a 3" factory trimmed valve made by Reliable. It's grooved on the top, flanged on the bottom so I will install an adapter to go from flange to groove on the bottom. I have a Ridgid 915 roll groover and I also have a friend who owns a large sprinkler company that will let me use cutters and other tools. Normally he would do this job for me but he's way too busy so he is pushing me to do it. This is kind of like throwing someone into the deep end of a pool to teach them to swim. I hate constantly asking him questions so that's why I asked here. Thanks. Oh- yes there is a control valve before where the alarm valve is going and no there's no pictures as of yet.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Grooved fittings

                    The standard Victaulic coupling is the Style 77. Dimensions are found in the table at the following link.
                    http://www.ags-agriflora.com/documentos/Victaulic.pdf

                    The range of gap for nominal 3" pipe is 0.00 to 0.06 inch. That is zero to 1/16".

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                    • #11
                      Re: Grooved fittings

                      Originally posted by jebj1 View Post
                      I can understand your concern. This is my first time working with grooved couplings. I own the company. We normally work on fire extinguishers and kitchen fire suppression systems.(Ansul systems ) We do a lot of sprinkler inspection, testing, maintenance, etc. .

                      How may I ask did you aquire a sprinkler contractors license and what state are you in. Did you not have to have a NICET level III to get a license (five years of design experience in fire protection layout, plus multipule test) or a PE (who could hold his license in any field).

                      This just does not make much sense to me, something is not right here.

                      G3

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                      • #12
                        Re: Grooved fittings

                        When did I get put on the witness stand here? You need to drink a beer and relax! " somethings not right here " you sound like a thrill to be around. I came on here to ask a simple question which miraculously was finally answered by BobNH. Thank you Bob for answering my question instead of giving me a pop quiz. By the way, there is no licensing in my area and in other areas I work under my friends license and he checks my work. I hope I've answered all of YOUR questions and satisfied YOUR curiosity.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Grooved fittings

                          First off I don't drink and I'm not the one who is up tight. It's a funny thing you are getting defensive when I only asked how you got into the business with out knowing what you are doing. Not sure where you are from since you did not want to post that information, don't know of anywhere you don't have to be licensed to do fire protection work since it is a life safety system. Just as I thought, and you said it yourself "I work under my friends license". That's all that I was saying that something didn't seem right. No need to get you panties in a wad pal, if you will look back at the thread you can see that I tried to help you and was not just telling you to study the coupling and you will figure it out. It's obvious you have never done any work with grooved pipeng and I was just asking some simple questions in the begining to help you out. No I am not a thrill to be around, but at least I know what I am doing. Get you some catalogs and cut sheets and figure it out on your own next time. If you would have taken the time to study as Bob told you to do, you would not have to come to a forum to ask such simple questions. Look at my first post to you, in the first sentence, that answered your question right there.

                          Maybe when you flood the place out you friends insurance will cover it.

                          Good luck

                          G3

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