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  • Ridgid 700 pipe threader - standard use

    Hi,
    I recently bought a Ridgid 700 pipe threader, in the past I've used a ridgid manual threader where I would cut a bit, back off, cut a bit, back off and so forth, in part because I was physically unable to apply the pressure required to cut without backing off. The only problem was, sometimes when I backed off, it would break a portion of a thread - which was a real pain.

    In reading the manual for the 700, it looks like the 'proper' way to do it with the 700 is to just start cutting until it is fully cut (while apply generous amounts of cutting oil), THEN back off the whole way.

    Am I reading the manual correctly?

    I tried it this way with a 1/2" pipe and it worked great, but when I tried a 1 1/4" pipe, it seemed like the amount of force was excessive, so I stopped and I'd like to hear from some experts before I break something. I have a few days before I need to do my dozens of threads so I'm not in a rush to do it wrong!

    Thank you!

  • #2
    Re: Ridgid 700 pipe threader - standard use

    use new good oil lot and lots. also put a nipple into the side hole and use a pipe wrench locked on the pipe let 700 tighten up to wrench. also check to see if theres threads in the handle end if so you can put a handle from manual threader into it for extra support. the 700 has lots of tourqe use with care if using tripod lock it down some how good luck jeff

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    • #3
      Re: Ridgid 700 pipe threader - standard use

      Thanks for the extra tips Jeff.

      So am I correct in understanding that are you saying, subject to the tips, 'yes - start it cutting and keep cutting the whole thread without backing up' ?

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      • #4
        Re: Ridgid 700 pipe threader - standard use

        yes keep cutting just like a 300 ect. sometimes a helper pumping oil helps

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        • #5
          Re: Ridgid 700 pipe threader - standard use

          the pipe wrench trick is fine, but ridgid makes a specific vise to hold back the torque of the threader. model #775 support arm.

          1.5'' is about my limit without the support arm. 2'' is pretty much impossible unless your name is tiny

          rick.
          phoebe it is

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          • #6
            Re: Ridgid 700 pipe threader - standard use

            what are you using to hold your pipe?? a tri-stand type vise or a heavy vise that is mounted solid.

            If a solid mount vise is being used then you can us a short piece of pipe in the handle of the 700 for more leverage to hold it back. If you are using a tri-stand type of vise thing can get to moving around pretty good sometimes. Use a piece of 1" pipe and the jack screw on the vise table to make it solid.

            Yep get the threads started and hold on, no need to stop. It is easier if you have some one else to oil it for you.

            The support arm or pipe wrench makes life much easier.

            G3

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            • #7
              Re: Ridgid 700 pipe threader - standard use

              >What type of stand

              I'm using a large (5x10') table with a pipe vice bolted down solid.

              >helper for oil
              I have a small pump I rigged up to pump about 1 gallon per minute of oil, so it is continously pumping oil on the threads/threads to be.

              I'll be trying the advice tomorrow. Thanks all.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Ridgid 700 pipe threader - standard use

                Ive had mine for twenty years and love it. I replaced to many oil tanks to count. Just cut the pipes about 6 -8 inches from top of tank. Slide out old tank thread pipes hanging down put on black unions a cpl nipples later new tank was done. I replace a lot of steam boilers too where I can just cut the black 2 inch nipple about a foot from the ceiling and thread it for a union. A 18 inch wrench will hold it back for 2 inch. Just make sure u position the wrench so the threader has room to move up the wrench as it threads.
                I also have a rigid chain vise I can attach to lally columns its a lot easier than the the tripod type

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                • #9
                  Re: Ridgid 700 pipe threader - standard use

                  >Just make sure u position the wrench so the threader has room to move up the wrench as it threads.

                  Good point!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Ridgid 700 pipe threader - standard use

                    I loved my Ridgid 700 but being a business owner meant that maintenance was my responsibility so I did not allow my guys to thread anything over 1''. For bigger piping I used a bigger style of threader also made by Ridgid.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Ridgid 700 pipe threader - standard use

                      Originally posted by rookie plumber View Post
                      I loved my Ridgid 700 but being a business owner meant that maintenance was my responsibility so I did not allow my guys to thread anything over 1''. For bigger piping I used a bigger style of threader also made by Ridgid.
                      and i wonder what that might be

                      and i wonder where you got it from

                      was that a #270

                      basically a #700 threader made into a tristand with a #300 chuck and rails

                      what a machine. wish i still had it

                      rick.
                      phoebe it is

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                      • #12
                        Re: Ridgid 700 pipe threader - standard use

                        Rick I'm talking about that big power threader of mine that was an older version of the 1224.

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