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  • Why we Press

    I have been meaning to post some of our larger industrial ProPress projects for some time now, so here you go. For those of you that Press you will appreciate the complexity and versatility of what you can do with ProPress technology. For those of you on the fence, this should help you figure out if it's really for you.

    This first set of Pictures is from our first ProPress project. (The one that made me pull the trigger) It was a retrofit of (3) 50 cubic foot water softeners. 4" face piping, 4" flanges and 4" valving. These units had been sitting idle since around 2000. We were initially brought in to look at them in 2002. We went back and forth with the parent company for six years after that initial review. The delay on there part was the enormous cost to fix these units and bring them back on line. Nobody in the company, from the local facility to the corporate personal wanted the capital expenditure to reflect on there budget. It took the Vice-President of Engineering and Construction for the parent company to finally say enough was enough and he approved the project in 2008.

    Unfortunately the cost of copper in 2008 was at a premium. Although we had some flexibility on the overall project quote, larger copper was putting the project out of reach. (on this project we were getting no more then 24 hour price guarantees on the larger copper pipe and fittings)

    I had been analyzing going with Viega ProPress for about a year prior to this project but had not made any decision as of yet. As this project came to the final negotiations I revisited ProPress by doing a side by side job costing comparison. The first thing I discovered was the actual cost of Viega fittings were cheaper then there Nibco, (or equivalent) counter parts here in the U.S. The reason! Viega fittings are not made in the U.S. nor is the copper used in them tied to the U.S. commodities market. This is why Viega at the time was only publishing one price book per year. The final cost savings factoring all the copper and the Labor savings was around $45,000.00. That substantial savings on the project is what allowed me to pull the trigger on purchasing the Ridgid Gun kits and large diameter pressing rings.

    Here are some pictures of what we started with and the finished project. Note that we installed vertical mounted UniStrut throughout the retro-fit to tie in the 4" piping with the actuating valves. We did this because the valves weigh in excess of 100 lbs. and we did not want the press-fittings to spin because of the weight of the valves nor did we want any movement in the pipes due to minor earthquakes or water surges in the line. When these units regenerate, they run approximately 80-100 gpm to drain.

    First ProPress Project

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  • #2
    Re: Why we Press

    Here are some additional Pictures of the same project. (had to split the post because I can only post seven pics at a time)

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    Last edited by Watersurgeon; 12-02-2011, 02:33 PM.

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    • #3
      Re: Why we Press

      Here is the second project we used ProPress Technology on. This was a complete system replacement. The original units were grossly undersized, and did not meet the flow requirements of the building. The following pictures show our initial walk thru and the various angles of the final project. Note that we tied into existing 4" lines and installed new three valve bypasses and even used some of the existing face piping.

      What made this project so unique was that it had to be done between the hours of 10pm and 5am. A complete building shut down from the street. This system was in a basement of a critical care facility. I believe it was a twelve story building. It took us about an hour to drain down the building enough to start cutting into the face piping. (we had pre-demoed out the old system a few days earlier) There were no isolation valves on the riser for tower. The main 4" butterfly, (not shown) that was suppose to isolate out the supply side water to the building did not close completely, (the reason for the building drain down) During the installation we had constant water coming out of the pipes. Had we done a conventional pipe sweating we would have never been able to complete it in the time frame. That said, we completed the initial bypasses and face pipe connections in about four hours. Pressure checked the fittings and had the building back on-line by 5am. Note the final tanks are over ten feet tall. The valves on top of them are 3" inlet/outlet 16" tall from the bottom to the top of the valve. (that should give you some perspective as to the size of the system - pictures don't convey the height and Monkey climbing we had to do to install all the piping)

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      Last edited by Watersurgeon; 12-02-2011, 03:15 PM.

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      • #4
        Re: Why we Press

        I'm imPressed with your Press. Nice job. I bet you made money using the press as well.

        If one were so inclined, they could count the fittings, apply the PHCC labor factor(s) for both sweat and press and figure out the savings.

        Again, smart move.

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        • #5
          Re: Why we Press

          Whooooooa,

          That is some beautiful work. I truley appreciate the craftsmanship. So you saying the whole press kit did all that. I m convinced. Also genius, The time you save compared to what it would take to either solder or vic clamp that whole job. Looks like you'll have a pretty nice christmas. Good job
          Wise man said "Hot on the left, cold on the right,
          crap flows downhill, and checks come on Friday"

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          • #6
            Re: Why we Press

            Very nice. It looks like the only tough part would have been getting all that GD paint off the large copper. There is a special place in hell for people who paint copper pipe.
            26+6=1

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            • #7
              Re: Why we Press

              Originally posted by EJW1 View Post
              Very nice. It looks like the only tough part would have been getting all that GD paint off the large copper. There is a special place in hell for people who paint copper pipe.
              We used a box of emery mesh to get all the paint off. Took us about an hour to get all the paint off, with everyone jumping in for ten minutes or so of back and forth, not to mention the Horizontal "Twister" you had to perform to get to the pipe and wedge yourself so you could get that back and forth motion going.

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