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  • ProPress

    What do you guys think about this concept?

  • #2
    What is propress? I would assume it has to do with joining copper pipes. How does it work? and why is it any better than soldering? I haven't heard about propress yet.

    Kirk

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    • #3
      <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Kirk54:
      What is propress? I would assume it has to do with joining copper pipes. How does it work? and why is it any better than soldering? I haven't heard about propress yet.
      <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

      Hi Kirk,

      Basically, ProPress is a mechanical system of joining copper pipe. There is no soldering or threading involved. ProPress involves using a special fitting and a tool to join two pieces of pipe in approximately 7 seconds, irregardless of the size of the pipe. The system can work with 1/2inch pipe up through 2 inch pipe. We have plans to take it up to 4 inches soon. Even the 4 inch size would only take 7 seconds.

      The reason you have not heard of it yet is probably due to several issues. First, it is brand new. It was just introduced 2 months ago. Furthermore, the initial roll-out had to be limited to certain cities. This is unfortunate, but is due in part to agency code approvals. Ridge Tool has gotten approval in several major cities, and several more are in progress. It does have NSF-61 and IAPMO. I can dig up the most recent list of cities for anyone interested.

      The other half of the initial roll-out involves logistics. Ridge Tool does not want to subject its ProPress customers to out-of-stock and backorder. Thus, a substantial inventory of fittings was built up (over 2.5 million). A general introduction would have required orders of magnitude more inventory.

      The ProPress system is described on our website. From the main page, use the menu system and choose "Products -> Related Products -> ProPress"

      If you have any more questions, please feel free to ask.

      -Phil

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      • #4
        FYI Here's a link to the Official ProPress Website http://www.propresssystem.com



        [This message has been edited by Josh (edited 08-11-2000).]

        Comment


        • #5
          <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by ToolMan:
          What do you guys think about this concept?<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

          The concept is very valuable because of the high and constant quality level you reach and the very short crimping time you need to assemble. You'll get a real competitive advantage trough the system. Know that crimping is common technology in Europe since many years. You may visit websites as www.viega.de or www.novartec.com if you want to know more.

          Kind regards

          Terry

          Comment


          • #6
            <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Kirk54:
            What is propress? I would assume it has to do with joining copper pipes. How does it work? and why is it any better than soldering? I haven't heard about propress yet.

            Kirk
            <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

            Hi Kirk

            The system is known since several years in Europe and it is very valuable since it allows you to reach a very high level and constant assembly quality of pipes and fittings. Have a look on the propress website or if you want more information: www.viega.de and www.novartec.com

            Kind regards

            Terry

            Comment


            • #7
              It looks interesting enough,but do you think this process will be able to compete with the PEX market.Or is it more for comercial type installations?What type of aplications is it recomended for?

              John
              Felciano Plumbing & Heating<P>http://www.felciano-plumbing.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Looks like a very useful way to install new plumbing, but how well can it perform in repair situations when you sometimes have to work around cabinetry, fixtures, and other appliances?

                Comment


                • #9
                  I would like to hear from someone in the field who has first-hand experience. I am curious to know how close the tolerances have to be for the crimping to be successful. I.E. -- Leaks?, vibration or water hammer problems?
                  D. McLean

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I was not able to get into the sight to see what and how this actually works. but it looks similar to a product Victaulic puts out. I have used and and can say that it is good for some installations, but there are some installations that it does not work well for and is not cost productive.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by D.McLean:
                      I would like to hear from someone in the field who has first-hand experience. I am curious to know how close the tolerances have to be for the crimping to be successful. I.E. -- Leaks?, vibration or water hammer problems?
                      D. McLean
                      <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


                      As Terry said, this is a proven system that has been used in Europe for a number of years. The system is extremely robust. There are current fittings in Europe that has been in place for 25 years without leaks. The joint will last as long as the pipe does.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        [QUOTE]Originally posted by Josh:
                        [B]FYI Here's a link to the Official ProPress Website http://www.propresssystem.com


                        that link doesn't work for me. how about this one: http://www.ridgid.com/propresssystem/propress.html

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Phil:
                          [B][QUOTE]Originally posted by Josh:
                          FYI Here's a link to the Official ProPress Website http://www.propresssystem.com


                          that link doesn't work for me. how about this one: http://www.ridgid.com/propresssystem/propress.html

                          <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                          Phil:

                          Due to current DNS mixups, www.propresssystem.com is not available from inside the Ridge Tool Company network, but it will work for those outside of Ridge Tool. We are working on the problem now, and hope to have it solved soon.

                          Thanks, Ryan

                          ------------------
                          Ryan Bales
                          Web Developer
                          Ridge Tool Company
                          rbales@ridgid.com

                          [This message has been edited by ryan (edited 08-18-2000).]
                          Ryan Bales<br />Web Developer <br />Ridge Tool Company<br />(440) 329-4531<br /><a href=\"http://www.ridgid.com/email/emailform.asp?ToAddress=rbales@ridgid.com&Subject= Forum@Reply\" target=\"_blank\">rbales@ridgid.com</a>

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Here in Europe the system exist already since a few years. I do use it myself. Until now in Belgium it was only admitted for water purposes but today in the Netherlands and in Germany you can buy special parts for gas distribution too.
                            Guys, this is really the future. You do not loose time, there is a large quantity of different parts. The more it is used, the cheaper it will become.
                            Very important is that you learn installers how to work with it. For example, we had a guy who did cut all pipes and fitted them with the press parts without pressing. He was going to do that at the end. When he started he forgot a few because he had no system. Tell them to press immediately after finishing a small part or to double check their works !!

                            ------------------
                            Jan Verbruggen
                            Jan Verbruggen

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by D.McLean:
                              I would like to hear from someone in the field who has first-hand experience. I am curious to know how close the tolerances have to be for the crimping to be successful. I.E. -- Leaks?, vibration or water hammer problems?
                              D. McLean
                              <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                              You are right, the quality issue is a great issue. The fittings and pipes are standardized and therefore they exactly fit to each other. But what you have to be careful is the crimping machine. It should have a hydraulic ram output of 7'200 lbs force, fully controlled crimping cycle and DVGW compatibe (means main system compatible) . If you use another machine that does not reach those specifications then you may have problems. Therfore only buy machines with those specifications. Not important is the crimping force since it changes on each type of crimping jaw. Therfore only specified crimping jaws should be used. If you are very concearned about quality, I would recommend you a fully automatic and self controlled criming machine. If you go to the ISH exhibition in Frankfurt next year, you will be able to meet all providers! A very good hint about such systems and information is: www.kwd-online.de. First you have many providers of crimping systems and if you click europipes then you may learn more about this system.

                              Take care

                              Terry

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