Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Copper pipe sizes

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Copper pipe sizes

    Here we have two common manufacturers of Copper Tube in Crane and Kembla. Now Kembla is such a sensational company and they have a pocket handbook which gives us everything we need to know about copper. My question here is do you have similar. It comes about because we have 4 grades of copper but really only 2 are common(or at least as far as I am concerned that is) being the most common type B and the next which is thicker being type A. Also is your Copper tube Imperial measurements....????

    I recently got a calculator from a supplier and was so excited until I realised it was based on American copper measurements. Now I have to think about things a whole lot different.......Of course expert help here will ease the journey.

    Thanks guys.

  • #2
    Here in the US the Copper Development Association has a handbook which has a lot of info about copper tube, sizes joining methods etc and it is useful both for plumbing and HVAC&R applications.

    Cannot tell from your post if you are looking for info on the US pipe sizing or Australia's but if the question is about US copper pipe sizing here is a link to the handbook.

    https://www.copper.org/publications/...e_handbook.pdf

    Comment


    • Cleanmen2
      Cleanmen2 commented
      Editing a comment
      Looking for American pipe sizes so I can compare. Was hoping that you guys had something like the CDA. We have one similar. Thankyou.....!!!!!!!

  • #3
    God damn it guys, you really make it hard for us...................heheheeeeeee
    Having worked with our copper sizes which are metric for over 35yrs I fear what I have asked for here. Great to see such information available though. We have similar too. Thanks once again

    Comment


    • #4
      When you say you have four grades are you referring to four different pipe
      (or tube) wall thicknesses?

      We have K, L, M, and DWV with type K having the thickest wall, L next, followed
      by M and then DWV being the thinnest.

      Sounds like they are the same only using different terminology.
      "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

      https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

      ----

      1/20/2017 - The Beginning of a new Error

      Comment


      • Cleanmen2
        Cleanmen2 commented
        Editing a comment
        I think you are right there Bob. Type A is our thickest wall cu tube followed by the most popular Type B. Dont see as much type C & D used anymore and that really isnt a bad thing. As far as DWV, we used to use what we call 70/30 brass tube. Had to flux to weld and generally feather the flame. Easy as buggery to blow holes in. Used to dress branches as well. Not sure whether the apprentices today would even know half of what we were taught. Most of the old hi-rise buildings had 70/30 stacks or even cast-iron. Over time we have seen splitting occur as well as crushing through lack of expansion allowance. 70/30 isnt as common nowadays because of cost.
        I think the main difference between your Cu tubes is that ours are metric and yours imperial, henceforth some blokes have cocked up buying their press-gear off ebay out of the States.

    • #5
      Actually the type A,B and C classification looks like an ASTM standard for metric. The Imperial version of the standard appears to be what specifics Type K, L and M.

      http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/co...88m-d_780.html

      Comment


      • #6
        Isn't that what I asked?

        He's referring to grades and we call them types. Semantics but
        I just wanted to be sure I understood what he meant by grades.
        "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

        https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

        ----

        1/20/2017 - The Beginning of a new Error

        Comment


        • Cleanmen2
          Cleanmen2 commented
          Editing a comment
          All good here Bob. Sorry but as you know we all have slightly different terms from time to time. Funny thing about this trade....................!!!!!

      • #7
        He refers to both grades and types - I'm guessing he meant type - I did not look at the standard in detail but since A, B and C are in mm they are probably similar to but not exactly the same as K,L and M. Did not expect metric pipe sizes to be specified by an American standards organization. I believe the British have their own standard via the BSI but again not looked into that so I could be mistaken.

        Comment


        • #8
          As I said above I think your measurements are Imperial(god that sounds funny saying it to you guys - sorry......heheeheee) and ours is metric. If you want to laugh a bit more we still call our copper tube 1/2" and 3/4" even though they are really 15.something mm and 19mm. Yeah we have some quirks downunder.......................!!!!!!
          (Come on Tony pipe in and give me a splash....)

          Comment


          • #9
            Originally posted by Cleanmen2 View Post
            As I said above I think your measurements are Imperial(god that sounds funny saying it to you guys - sorry......heheeheee) and ours is metric. If you want to laugh a bit more we still call our copper tube 1/2" and 3/4" even though they are really 15.something mm and 19mm. Yeah we have some quirks downunder.......................!!!!!!
            (Come on Tony pipe in and give me a splash....)
            Happens here as well - I've seen things originally sized in metric being referred to in equivalent Imperial terms.

            I wish the US would switch to SI and get in line with the rest of the world!

            Comment


            • #10
              Originally posted by blue_can View Post

              Happens here as well - I've seen things originally sized in metric being referred to in equivalent Imperial terms.

              I wish the US would switch to SI and get in line with the rest of the world!
              we do not need to screw up more of our inventory or things by going more metric, now a person needs about 4 or 5 diffident bolts sets and sizes, two complete sets of wrenches and sockets, and seems to need more all the time, do to changes in fasteners,

              last thing we need is to have to carry two or three different sizes of pipe sizes, or fittings that nearly the same but different, that can screw up the projects,



              Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
              attributed to Samuel Johnson
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
              PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

              Comment


              • Bob D.
                Bob D. commented
                Editing a comment
                'We' would not be screwed up IF 'we' had got on board with the metric system back in the 60s.
                When I was in grade school we had to learn the metric system as it was 'just around the corner',
                you'll be using it before you get out of high school. Yeah, that never happened.

                Stick in the mud, old school, unwilling to change thinking has kept us from fully adopting the
                metric system and has actually cost us jobs and access to some products in the long run.

                Companies that refuse to adopt the new global standard only to benefit their bottom line have
                lobbied to keep things as they are for the past 40 years, and that has hurt us (as in USA) too.

              • PLUMBER RICK
                PLUMBER RICK commented
                Editing a comment
                I too had the metric system being taught in school. Truthfully it's much easier to learn or convert than fractions. working with 1's and 0's is like working with pennies, dimes and dollars.

                biggest problem with the construction trades is there is no exact equivalent for our dimensions. call it what you want, but a 2x4 will not come out the same.

                years ago when kwc pull out kitchen sink faucets came to our country, they used 10mm supply lines without fittings. 3/8'' was not a direct replacement for the supply lines. 3/8'' = 9.52mm. 10mm adapters were hard to find and expensive.

                Then you have drill bits in the standard fractional sizes 1/16''-1/2'' , A-Z, and 1-60 who the heck comes up with all these different measurements?

                Rick.

              • Bob D.
                Bob D. commented
                Editing a comment
                Yes, there are many areas of our lives where direct exact conversions will not be possible, but sooner or later it needs to happen, and the longer we put it off the harder it will be. IT shouldn't be much of a problem for manufacturing though since we don't make squat here any more, it's all done overseas and I bet it you where to check most things you'll find they are manufactured using the metric system. Check the dimensions on just about anything from China and see if it's not in whole millimeters and not imperial inches and fractional inches. Probably everything you _think_ is 1/4" is actually 5 or 6 mm and just labeled as 1/4" for us lazy Americans. And the list goes on.

            • #11
              Any chance you posting a link to AU's copper tube manufacturers counterpart?

              Comment


              • #12
                Mighty, will try to find it and post

                Comment


                • #13
                  It's about as easy to find as you could hope for;


                  North America www.copper.org

                  UK http://copperalliance.org.uk/

                  OZ http://www.copper.com.au

                  Global site http://copperalliance.org/

                  Last edited by Bob D.; 04-15-2017, 06:13 AM.
                  "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

                  https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

                  ----

                  1/20/2017 - The Beginning of a new Error

                  Comment


                  • Mightyservant
                    Mightyservant commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Excellent information for designers and journeymen.

                  • Cleanmen2
                    Cleanmen2 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Bob THANKYOU........!!!!!! Saved me yet again from embarrassing myself with my lack of computer skills.

                • #14
                  Bob, thanks for giving me yet another "area to get lost in"...................!!!! Amazing how much information is out there for Cu tube. Wonder whether pex will ever equal Cu

                  DO IT PROPER, DO IT COPPER..................

                  Comment


                  • Mightyservant
                    Mightyservant commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Copper has anti microbial properties, can be recycled, and does not put out toxic fumes in fires.

                • #15
                  pity copper is so exy, even though pulling composites through places is way easier it still eats away at the fact that we grew up on copper. Still use it on gas though. Dont trust composites and dont have the larger sizes. Also the extra support and consideration makes it comparable on overall cost. Yep I will always like copper...............!!!!!!

                  Comment


                  • Mightyservant
                    Mightyservant commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Compared to that other garbage it is, while copper has some quirks, it's never been associated with the release highly questionable chemicals. You can't expose many of the plastics to sunlight since it weakens them and lets face it, if you have to baby the pipe it's probably crap. I ask customers, You want it to last or you want cheap?
                Working...
                X