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Pipe Wrenches...

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  • #16
    Re: Pipe Wrenches...

    Looks like this one...

    http://www.ridgid.com/Tools/Offset-Pipe-Wrench/



    How good are the Rothenberger line of wrenches???

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    • #17
      Re: Pipe Wrenches...

      rigid makes them also i use mine quite a bit

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      • #18
        Re: Pipe Wrenches...

        except it does not have the multiple jaws

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        • #19
          Re: Pipe Wrenches...

          There is supposedly actual pipe sizes versus pipe wrench size specs.

          What we were told in school was 1/2" to 3/4" is a 14", 1" to 1 1/4" is 18" and 1 1/2" to 2" is 24"

          I would say those are pretty accurate as far as I'm concerned.

          Being in the field I use Ridgid Aluminum Wrenches. I own 2 - 18" Aluminum Ridgids and 1 - 24" Ridgid Aluminum (I don't do THAT much 1 1/2" and 2" but when I do, I often use an 18" to backwrench with the 24" for now anyways until I buy another 24"). Generally speaking you should always buy wrenches in pairs and the pairs should be the same size. A longer pipe wrench, or at least the proper one, will make your job easier. But don't go too large as overtightening sometimes isn't as good as undertightening.

          The one thing I"ve noticed over a quality Ridgid Wrench over an imitation brand that is much cheaper, is the Ridgid's are balanced better, and lighter in most cases. Makes a big difference at the end of the day.

          I use my 18's for 1/2" to 1 1/4" and I find that becuase I'm used to them, I have a very good feel working with them as to what is tight and what isn't (or "snug" is the common word). Learn your wrenches. It sounds funny, but it's true.

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          • #20
            Re: Pipe Wrenches...

            Originally posted by Scott K View Post
            I use my 18's for 1/2" to 1 1/4" and I find that becuase I'm used to them, I have a very good feel working with them as to what is tight and what isn't (or "snug" is the common word). Learn your wrenches. It sounds funny, but it's true.

            scott, time to go to the gym an 18'' wrench is a little bit of an overkill with 1/2'' pipe. i use 10'' on 1/2'' new. even today in a cabinet i needed to remove a gal nipple and angle stop. i didn't want to go back and get my 1/2'' drive mcmannis wrench to get into that tight space.

            a trick i found was to install bike type grips on the end of the handles to prevent cheeters? and keep that new, almost 3 year old ring from digging into my finger when i put the pressure on. april 25th will be #3.

            please give me a heads up by the 24th. i need to buy a card or else mrs seat down will keep the seat down

            the 6'' ridgid wrench was stashed in mrs. seat down's garter. what a surprise the wedding guest had when i removed it. told them i was going to lay some pipe .

            no wise cracks on the 6'' wrench. or else i'll have to break out the 60'' wrench on ya

            rick.
            phoebe it is

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            • #21
              Re: Pipe Wrenches...

              Just in case anyone is interested

              Pipe Wrench
              On September 13, 1870, a patent was granted to Daniel C. Stillson, a steamboat fireman, for a "wrench". Stillson invented the pipe wrench - sometimes called the Stillson pipe wrench. Stillson, suggested to the heating and piping firm Walworth manufacture a design for a wrench that could be used for screwing pipes together. Previously, serrated blacksmith tongs had been used for that purpose. The owner, James Walworth told Stillson to make a prototype and “either twist off the pipe or break the wrench.” Stillson's prototype twisted the pipe successfully. His design was then patented and Walworth manufactured the wrench. Stillson was paid about $80,000 in royalties during his lifetime.
              Attached Files

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              • #22
                Re: Pipe Wrenches...

                Originally posted by Greenie View Post
                Hello... I'm a homeowner and something of a tool snob. I may not be the most skilled plumber, but I believe that I can tackle some fairly challenging tasks.
                I want to know what size pipe wrenches I should get (Ridgid, correct?). The Black and Decker books don't specify a convenient size, although I worked out about 14 inches from their photo.
                I'm a man of six-foot height and weigh about 170 lbs. and I don't want to be cursing my choice of wrenches later. Do I go with the slightly-heavy 14-inchers and have that extra leverage or work with the 12s, slipping a length of pipe when I need it?
                By the by, the house is one that I hope to re-pipe someday in copper. As it stands, the galvanized rules the roost.
                In short, I need wrenches that I can feel becoming part of my arms, not tools that I hate to pick up.
                Thanks. Greenie
                The Ridgid Tool Company does not recommend using "cheater bars" (extentions) on their pipe wrenches. On their web site go to "Support" then go to "Tool Tips and Techniques" and then "Pipe Wrenches" It explains all you need to know about using pipe wrenches.
                If it weren't for your plumber, you wouldn't have any place to go!

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                • #23
                  Re: Pipe Wrenches...

                  I've got a couple Ridgid pipe wrenches and the jaws are not as sharp as should be from wear over the years. Will they replace these under warranty?

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                  • #24
                    Re: Pipe Wrenches...

                    Originally posted by Newman View Post
                    I've got a couple Ridgid pipe wrenches and the jaws are not as sharp as should be from wear over the years. Will they replace these under warranty?
                    no,no,no

                    that's why they sell the replacement parts. wear is not failure.

                    touch them up with a dremel. it only takes a few seconds per tooth.

                    rick.
                    phoebe it is

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: Pipe Wrenches...

                      I love my aluminum Ridgids, I also have the offset 14" aluminum, I have only needed it once in 1-1/2 years of being in business, but it was the only wrench that would work in that situation. My policy is that if i have to buy a tool for a job, the customer pays for it, and I keep it.

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                      • #26
                        Re: Pipe Wrenches...

                        Or try a small 4 sided file and re-sharpen the teeth with it.

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                        • #27
                          Re: Pipe Wrenches...

                          I guess that's why it's good to buy Craftsman - you take the tool back and get a new one...

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