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  • Cast Iron Replacement

    What's the easiest way to remove a vertical (& corroded) cast iron dwv stack from the floor flange? I intend to cut it top and bottom, then remove it, and replace it with pvc & neoprene sleeve, but first I have to get old lead & oakum out, which I've never done before.
    Alternately I could use cast iron again with oakum & lead wool, but because the top piece will still be in place, I'll likely have to splice in a section using sleeves. Is there a better way to do this?
    Regardless I am still going to have to remove whatever is left of the original pipe because it is leaking about a half inch off the point where it enters the floor Y cleanout.

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Re: Cast Iron Replacement

    Sorry folks I've posted in the wrong forum - I will address this and please ignore the previous post.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Cast Iron Replacement

      Originally posted by davidson View Post
      What's the easiest way to remove a vertical (& corroded) cast iron dwv stack from the floor flange? I intend to cut it top and bottom, then remove it, and replace it with pvc & neoprene sleeve, but first I have to get old lead & oakum out, which I've never done before.
      Alternately I could use cast iron again with oakum & lead wool, but because the top piece will still be in place, I'll likely have to splice in a section using sleeves. Is there a better way to do this?
      Regardless I am still going to have to remove whatever is left of the original pipe because it is leaking about a half inch off the point where it enters the floor Y cleanout.

      Thanks.
      There is no easy way.
      It sounds like (correct me if I'm wrong) you have a cast iron hub at the floor and the pipe going into it is leaking 1/2" above that because it's cracked? I'm a visual person so pictures would help me alot here. I would probably fix it by cutting the cast iron up high with a pair of ratchet snappers put my Fernco coupling there and melt out the lead in the hub and caulk a new joint with lead & oakum. I prefer to go back with cast looks better and PVC just can't support the weight. Without the snappers and a good acelyene torch you may not want to try this. If you have a sawzall you can cut the pipe with a carbide blade takes a while but it will work and its a safer cut. With the pipe is leaking so close to the hub still got to "get the lead" out as they say. They make a mechanical clamp that can go over the hub to stop leaks eliminating the need to remove the lead. I have no expierence with those though.

      If you decide to use the method I explained above there are a few tips you need to know 1st.

      ~Bill

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      • #4
        Re: Cast Iron Replacement

        Bill, thanks, here's some photos detailing it.
        The pipe is suffering the "graphitization corrosion" and the holes are plugged with 5/8 nylon cap screws and epoxy, it works for now.
        Attached Files

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        • #5
          Re: Cast Iron Replacement

          Dont have anything to add here, but that looks like a real fun job .

          I can feel your pain , but take the adivse you will be given to heart, there wont be a easy way to do this without the proper tools.

          Regards,

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Cast Iron Replacement

            I would only recommend taking this project on if you were selling the house and the home inspector mentioned it in his report. If it don't leak, don't fix it.

            I may be wrong but I've only seen graphitization occur on only underground cast and ductile iron. Maybe it happens above ground as well but at a slower rate I don't know. Do NOT use the ratchet snappers I mentioned earlier all they will do is crush that pipe. Best to use a sawzall for this application or 4" grinder with metal wheel to cut it. Watch the sparks. Getting around the back may be tough. Is that a block wall behind it? Looking at your pics you might have enough roon to cut cast just below the epoxy plug and above wye to get a Fernco coupling with shear ring on. There is good news however. The upper section connects onto copper. Cut the copper with a metal sawzall blade and attach a Mission band.

            Good luck,

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            • #7
              Re: Cast Iron Replacement

              Pcrack gave great advice and here's my 2 cents. Before cutting any pipe, make sure the pipe at the top is properly supported and can't drop down when you cut the pipes. I've always called the "support"; riser clamps. Don't know if that's the right term or not.

              I love the lenox diamond blades for cutting cast. Anything alse and you're wasting time.
              Buy cheap, buy twice.

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              • #8
                Re: Cast Iron Replacement

                Originally posted by gear junkie View Post
                Pcrack gave great advice and here's my 2 cents. Before cutting any pipe, make sure the pipe at the top is properly supported and can't drop down when you cut the pipes. I've always called the "support"; riser clamps. Don't know if that's the right term or not.

                I love the lenox diamond blades for cutting cast. Anything alse and you're wasting time.
                Lenox blade to cut cast is the 824 R, works great, also diamond blade to use on your grinder, great for repairing soft old cast iron
                sigpic

                Robert

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                • #9
                  Re: Cast Iron Replacement

                  Originally posted by gear junkie View Post
                  Pcrack gave great advice and here's my 2 cents. Before cutting any pipe, make sure the pipe at the top is properly supported and can't drop down when you cut the pipes. I've always called the "support"; riser clamps. Don't know if that's the right term or not.

                  I love the lenox diamond blades for cutting cast. Anything alse and you're wasting time.
                  Excellent point about the support. This pipe goes directly up to the toilet on the main floor, but also has the roof vent joined to it. I would hope that's properly supported, but I sure would not bet on it. In the area directly above the coppper-to-cast-iron transition, there are definitely no supports. Do installations of this type typically rely on the cast iron for load bearing?

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                  • #10
                    Re: Cast Iron Replacement

                    Originally posted by davidson View Post
                    Excellent point about the support. This pipe goes directly up to the toilet on the main floor, but also has the roof vent joined to it. I would hope that's properly supported, but I sure would not bet on it. In the area directly above the coppper-to-cast-iron transition, there are definitely no supports. Do installations of this type typically rely on the cast iron for load bearing?

                    yes they do. todays codes require support at every floor level. you can install a riser clamp above your ceiling joist and let it rest on the floor. do this prior to cutting any pipe.

                    rick.
                    phoebe it is

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