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1215 Threader

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  • 1215 Threader

    My company bought a 1215 Threader soon after it was introduced in 97 and since that time have replaced the drip tray and plastic leg a few times. Needless to say, we put this puppy through the paces. I have a suggestion for the designers. Whenever it's review time for this machine. Guys, we're slamming, jabbing, cutting, reaming and threading steel pipes. Would it be possible to maybe remodel the shape of the oil catching tray or maybe change from plastic to another material that would better relate to the raison d'├Ętre of this machine? The bigger threaders are just that, big, bulky and made for Big jobs. In my opinion, the machine That should get the bullet proofing treatment should be the 1215. This has been bugging me for awhile and Ive mentioned this to the Rep in my area. I may as well rant on the web. For the range of pipe sizes to it's physical size and weight, it's the perfect Service orientated threading machine...after a couple of tweaks on the drawing board...I Hope...Cheers!

  • #2
    Thanks for the input Penguin. I will forward your comments to the engineers involved with this and see what if any plans are for further developments in regards to this machine.

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    • #3
      Penquin,

      The 1215 was an entry into a market that was new for Ridge Tool. As you noted, we make large, heavy duty machines. If you remember when you got your 1215, there really wasn't any other machine in that size.

      The use of plastic parts is what allowed us to bring the machine to market. It is flexible, easy to form, and easy to tool up. And it stands up well to *most* abuse. Stamped steel parts would have brought the 1215 too close in cost to it's larger brethren.

      There are no current plans to retool parts for the 1215. It is a low volume product for us, so current tooling is in good condition.

      Sorry I couldn't give you the answer you were hoping for. I'm glad you like your 1215. It happens to be my favorite project of the threaders I've worked on.

      Steve

      [ 02-25-2004, 08:48 PM: Message edited by: smorris ]
      Steve
      www.MorrisGarage.com

      Comment


      • #4
        To anyone and everyone who owns, or operates a 1215, I'm wondering one thing... How much do they weight? I can't find this information anywhere. Thanks in advance for your help.
        Anthony

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        • #5
          The catalog shows the shipping weight at 69 pounds. My recollection was more around 75-80 pounds with machine, oil, die head, and footswitch.

          Hope this helps,
          Steve
          Steve
          www.MorrisGarage.com

          Comment


          • #6
            The Ridgid answer to your complaint seems like it went no-where. I was kind of in the market for this, but I think I'll look at the Rothemberger.

            the dog
            the dog

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            • #7
              See now, there you go rabble rousing again...

              As noted above, with the current volume of the 1215, there is no possible way to financially justify spending $20-$30k on steel stamping tooling, and have a steel part that costs three times that of the current.

              I would love to add a steel chip tray. We wanted to when the product was released!

              You'll like the Rothenberger machine. That is the machine that was previously the Asada threader, and is made in Japan (or at least it was 6-8 years ago, but Japanese companies have been farming stuff out to lower cost Asian contries lately.) We did field trials with the Asada, and while plumbers liked the machine over all, they felt it was too small and underpowered. You might not think so, though... Good luck!

              (Psssttt! It has plastic chip trays, too. )

              Steve

              [ 08-11-2005, 10:28 AM: Message edited by: smorris ]
              Steve
              www.MorrisGarage.com

              Comment


              • #8
                YOU TELL HIM SMORRIS. THE DOGS BEEN A LITTLE FIESTY LATELY. ALTHOUGH HE DID PAY ME A COMPLIMENT YESTERDAY CONCERNING METRIC FITTINGS, I THINK?

                THANKS FOR ALL YOUR INSIDE KNOWLEDGE.

                HOW MUCH INFO DO YOU HAVE ON THE PROPRESS AND THE ADAPTABILITY OF ITS JAWS BEING COMPATABLE WITH NIBCO FITTINGS. ALSO RED AND WHITE HAS OUT BALL VALVES THAT ARE MADE WITH THE PRO PRESS STYLE ENDS. ARE THESE COMPATABLE WITH THE RIDGID PROPRESS , VIEGA JAWS?

                THANKS RICK.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK:
                  HOW MUCH INFO DO YOU HAVE ON THE PROPRESS AND THE ADAPTABILITY OF ITS JAWS BEING COMPATABLE WITH NIBCO FITTINGS.
                  Sorry, Rick. I don't follow the ProPress end of the business, so I don't know the answers to your questions.
                  Steve
                  www.MorrisGarage.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    while you guys are looking at the plastic trays of the machines, i suggest Ridgid change the plastic cover and plastic tray of the 1822-i machine too.. it easily gets cracked and i have seen some units that are almost so brand new with cracked on them.. just suggesting..

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