Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

confined space, do you worry?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Re: confined space, do you worry?

    I just call out for one of the many people in my mind when I 'am in a confined space. Works every time and I never alone. Or am I ????

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: confined space, do you worry?

      bout the only thing I worry about is a cave-in. I have been doing dirt work most of my life and when I have to dig to a city main to hook-up, I always worry about the side walls caving in on me or my helpers. I always try to leave the backhoe in the hole and stand on the bucket for a quick get-a-way. One of these day`s I`m gonna wish I`d used trench boxes I`m sure
      I`v lost many friends and you would think that I would have learned by what they did wrong. Like everyone else, I take to many things granite
      Last edited by All Clear Sewer; 08-01-2007, 11:11 AM.
      http://www.all-clear-sewer.com/

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: confined space, do you worry?

        Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
        I am surprised to hear how casually some of you protect yourselves from the dangers of confined spaces. I realize some are one man shops or work alone on many jobs but I think there are still things you can do to reduce the chances of becoming a statistic. They may sound expensive but in the long run they are not.

        The places I have spent most of my 31 years in the trade working (refineries, chemical plants, utilities) first off do not allow anyone to work in a confided space without someone standing by on the outside. The space must also be 'sniffed' to ensure the atmosphere in the space can support life and the O2 levels is within the allowable range. Now-a-days you can get sniffers and also monitors that you wear on your person for relatively little money (I'd rather spend a couple hundred bucks than be dead, how about you?). If ti needs re-calibration or service every year so what, it is cheaper than a (your) funeral.

        The first job of any 'outside man' or 'hole watch' is to summon help, NOT to jump in and possibly die beside his buddy who has succumbed to whatever danger lurks within. Since you all state you have received training in confined space work I won't bore you with the details, you know you are putting yourselves at risk with you casual attitude.

        I fail to see why any one would choose to 'get the job done' no matter the threat to their own life or a co-workers or an employee. That attitude is not macho or tough it is stupid, period. Well, actually I can because I can remember some stuff I did looking back that was stupid from where I sit now (like on a high school we were building I climbed a 30' ladder with a oxygen bottle on my shoulder instead of waiting for the Lull because of the perceived pressure to keep cutting openings in the deck for pipe sleeves and stay ahead of the ironworkers). I am not trading my life to complete a repair or perform any type of work in this or any other trade for any amount of money, I doubt any of you are either.

        This is not war, there is no situation under which to me you can justify throwing away a life to achieve some goal. Work smart and live to make money and hug your wife and kids when you get home that evening.

        I have not done much jobbing or service work, I did a year as an apprentice many years ago. Since I was an apprentice I was not allowed to work alone, so I was never really in the situation as some of you are when making service calls. But the outfit I worked for back then would not let us do silly things like this either. We were instructed to call the shop and get some help, not take chances on being injured or killed. The shop manager always blew a cork saying we were killing his schedule but we would get some help.

        I know some of you will want to dismiss my position and warnings as those of someone who is too old, or too cautious or afraid to take a chance. If you are lucky you will live to be old enough that someone will say the same about you in 20 or 30 years, if you're not they will be standing over your grave saying he sure was a great guy, he'd do anything for you (even give up his life to clean your drain).
        well some really are too overly cautious while some are indeed risk takers..

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: confined space, do you worry?

          Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
          I am surprised to hear how casually some of you protect yourselves from the dangers of confined spaces. I realize some are one man shops or work alone on many jobs but I think there are still things you can do to reduce the chances of becoming a statistic. They may sound expensive but in the long run they are not.

          The places I have spent most of my 31 years in the trade working (refineries, chemical plants, utilities) first off do not allow anyone to work in a confided space without someone standing by on the outside. The space must also be 'sniffed' to ensure the atmosphere in the space can support life and the O2 levels is within the allowable range. Now-a-days you can get sniffers and also monitors that you wear on your person for relatively little money (I'd rather spend a couple hundred bucks than be dead, how about you?). If ti needs re-calibration or service every year so what, it is cheaper than a (your) funeral.

          The first job of any 'outside man' or 'hole watch' is to summon help, NOT to jump in and possibly die beside his buddy who has succumbed to whatever danger lurks within. Since you all state you have received training in confined space work I won't bore you with the details, you know you are putting yourselves at risk with you casual attitude.

          I fail to see why any one would choose to 'get the job done' no matter the threat to their own life or a co-workers or an employee. That attitude is not macho or tough it is stupid, period. Well, actually I can because I can remember some stuff I did looking back that was stupid from where I sit now (like on a high school we were building I climbed a 30' ladder with a oxygen bottle on my shoulder instead of waiting for the Lull because of the perceived pressure to keep cutting openings in the deck for pipe sleeves and stay ahead of the ironworkers). I am not trading my life to complete a repair or perform any type of work in this or any other trade for any amount of money, I doubt any of you are either.

          This is not war, there is no situation under which to me you can justify throwing away a life to achieve some goal. Work smart and live to make money and hug your wife and kids when you get home that evening.

          I have not done much jobbing or service work, I did a year as an apprentice many years ago. Since I was an apprentice I was not allowed to work alone, so I was never really in the situation as some of you are when making service calls. But the outfit I worked for back then would not let us do silly things like this either. We were instructed to call the shop and get some help, not take chances on being injured or killed. The shop manager always blew a cork saying we were killing his schedule but we would get some help.

          I know some of you will want to dismiss my position and warnings as those of someone who is too old, or too cautious or afraid to take a chance. If you are lucky you will live to be old enough that someone will say the same about you in 20 or 30 years, if you're not they will be standing over your grave saying he sure was a great guy, he'd do anything for you (even give up his life to clean your drain).

          Very well said Bob
          sigpic

          Robert

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: confined space, do you worry?

            There seems to be common items with the confined space tragedies of late:

            - Have always entered a manure pit to clean it -
            - Always thougt it was a bad odor, did not know it was an asphyxiant (displaces oxygen)
            - unaware of the hazards associated with methane and hydrogen sulfide(can be generated easily in common wastes)

            Key to going home after work: understand and be aware of the hazards and where they might be. Use a gas monitor for the unseen.
            Last edited by WV Brian; 08-07-2007, 05:42 PM. Reason: typo

            Comment

            Working...
            X