Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The "Union"

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Re: The "Union"

    Originally posted by Tieger plumbing
    Great question

    1- You take a test to get into the apprenticeship

    2- You go to classes ( my time was 2 nights a week for 5 years) 10,000 hours and 744 hours class room studies, code,math ,welding ,brazing, safety, blue print reading and drawing, working with various types of piping connections like Pyrex etc


    3- Then you work for a Master plumber In NYC you had to work under the auspices of a master for a total of 10 years (now it is 7 years) then you go for your 4 part masters exams.

    Written (mine was 4 hours) then if you pass it there is an 7 hour practical exam given at a later date.

    You get to take 3 practical for every written test.

    A lot of places just have Micky mouse codes and don't bother with a practical test.

    The UA training if you take full advantage of it is amazing and that knowledge goes with you no matter if you do.

    With a class A Journeyman's card you can work any type of plumbing under the masters license in most areas, with a Masters license you hire journeymen and apprentices.

    What I would suggest when you get into the union try to diversify as much as possible. I worked commercial, industrial, institutional, residential, hospitals (medical gas lines) power stations X ray welding all kinds of "plumbing" that you should try to expose yourself to

    New work is like being a monkey after the first floor the other 47 stories are typical BORING,

    Plumbing you can specialize like estimating, drainage systems (acid waste) there is so much out to choose from.

    If you want contact Normsplumb@AOL.com and ask him to sign you up to the PIPDL He is a LEFT Coast (California) plumber / EX sea bee and was a NYC plumber.

    Here is a link to show how different plumbers look at the same question

    http://www.masterplumbers.com/plumbv...atersupply.asp
    Sylvan the rooster?

    Yada,yada,yada

    Comment


    • #32
      Re: Passing a test the first time

      Originally posted by Tieger plumbing
      Thank you

      BY the way your lucky in many civilized areas if you flunk a license test 3 times YOUR OUT OF LUCK good thing California allows folks to keep trying and trying and trying and trying until they luck out.

      Passing a test the first time is not for everyone I guess, JUST hang in there mam IM sure you will pass the tests (I hope they don't change the real estate laws to much huh?)

      Thank you for the best wishes

      Comment


      • #33
        Re: The "Union"

        I am working for a company in canada as a third-year apprentice. My wife is American. I was wondering if i were to move to the states if my hours would be transferable. The company I work for is Ocean Park Mechanical. The company is Union in the states, but not in Canada where i work. I was thinking it would be easy to ask for a transfer.... but i dont want to have to start-over again as a grunt.

        Comment


        • #34
          Re: The "Union"

          I think the best thing to do would be to contact the Local Union your thinking of joining once you move to the United States, and talk to them about it.
          Proud To Be Union!!

          Comment


          • #35
            Re: The "Union"

            Originally posted by eddiegoodfellar View Post
            I am working for a company in canada as a third-year apprentice. My wife is American. I was wondering if i were to move to the states if my hours would be transferable. The company I work for is Ocean Park Mechanical. The company is Union in the states, but not in Canada where i work. I was thinking it would be easy to ask for a transfer.... but i dont want to have to start-over again as a grunt.
            When I first went to the union I was an apprentice, I had two years under my belt and three referrals from local union members.
            The starting wage for a new apprentice was nowhere near enough for me to live on, so I asked if they could include my hours.
            Tha answer was no.
            If I wanted the union job at a reasonable rate, I was asked to come back with my license.
            As far as apprentice hours are concerned I don't think many, if any, jurisdictions will accept them.
            License are a whole different ballpark, most require that you pass the local test to have it transferred.

            Comment


            • #36
              Re: The "Union"

              the union dictates their own rules. i would think with a couple of years documented that aaron should be able to get in beyond a first year apprentice.

              i would ask the your local union hall.

              also the pay scale is the minimum. there is nothing wrong with paying an apprentice more than his scale. that is something between the boss and arron. typically a nice year end bonus is a prime example and it's legal.

              if arron could find on his own, a union shop that will sponsor him, all of this can be worked out. if he is sent to a shop from the hall, good luck.

              rick.
              phoebe it is

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: The "Union"

                Originally posted by DuckButter View Post
                When I first went to the union I was an apprentice, I had two years under my belt and three referrals from local union members.
                The starting wage for a new apprentice was nowhere near enough for me to live on, so I asked if they could include my hours.
                Tha answer was no.
                If I wanted the union job at a reasonable rate, I was asked to come back with my license.
                As far as apprentice hours are concerned I don't think many, if any, jurisdictions will accept them.
                License are a whole different ballpark, most require that you pass the local test to have it transferred.
                That’s kind of what I thought would happen. I was hoping that there might be an exception in my case because I am working for the same company and would just be “transferring” to another site that happened to be across the border.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Re: The "Union"

                  Originally posted by eddiegoodfellar View Post
                  That’s kind of what I thought would happen. I was hoping that there might be an exception in my case because I am working for the same company and would just be “transferring” to another site that happened to be across the border.
                  I am in NO way saying don't ask.
                  Just know what to expect, worse case scenario.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: The "Union"

                    So Rick your saying once I get my GED(test date at the end of Oct.) I should go to my Local Union's Website, find the name's of some contractors and contact them before the hall?
                    Proud To Be Union!!

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: The "Union"

                      Originally posted by eddiegoodfellar View Post
                      That’s kind of what I thought would happen. I was hoping that there might be an exception in my case because I am working for the same company and would just be “transferring” to another site that happened to be across the border.

                      Sometimes the unions can make an exception and grant you either journeyman card or with a company's request allow you to join the union

                      As far as pay is concerned many mechanics and apprentices get above union scale. An apprentice can get mechanics pay but still has to attend classes as was my case.

                      A company has the right to bring in a "rising star" or they can say your a foreman then you are not required to be union from what I remember.

                      Contact the United Association or the very least find out what local the company is signed up with and contact a business agent and tell them what you would like to do.

                      It is better to get a name and have everything ready prior to making the move and try to get everything in writing

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Re: The "Union"

                        Originally posted by eddiegoodfellar View Post
                        I am working for a company in canada as a third-year apprentice. My wife is American. I was wondering if i were to move to the states if my hours would be transferable. The company I work for is Ocean Park Mechanical. The company is Union in the states, but not in Canada where i work. I was thinking it would be easy to ask for a transfer.... but i dont want to have to start-over again as a grunt.
                        Your best bet would be to contact in the Union Hall in the city where you are moving and ask them if they will accept the hours you already have in. You'll probably have to come up with some documentation to prove hours worked, etc. but it can't hurt to ask.

                        Go to http://www.ua.org/links.asp and find the Local closest to where you are moving. If they don't have a web site with contact information then use on on the UA International web site and tell them where you are moving to, they will get back to you or have some one contact you I'll bet.
                        "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" Bob D. 2006

                        https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Re: The "Union"

                          Originally posted by Aaron91 View Post
                          So Rick your saying once I get my GED(test date at the end of Oct.) I should go to my Local Union's Website, find the name's of some contractors and contact them before the hall?
                          Many times the apprentice cannot seek their own job they have to be placed by the union hall.

                          The reasoning is quite simple as an apprentice it is a great idea to get to do most aspects of "plumbing" residential, commercial, industrial, institutional.

                          It would be a shame to spend 5 years or whatever the apprenticeship program your in to work for one employer doing only one type of work and only working with one or two journeymen.

                          New construction for example on a high rise after the under ground is in and the first floor is finished the rest is monkey work totally repetitious and boring.

                          Even tract housing after one or two your an expert thus no more challenge and very boring requiring very little skill level.

                          Variety in the field gives you the real education like a doctor has to do a variety of rotations to see which one they like the best or want to specialize in.

                          There is a hell of a lot to "plumbing" and normally a shop will specialize and that is ok if your a journeyman and decide this is what type of plumbing you like but try to get a varied education as much as possible during your time as an apprentice.

                          Once you reach journeyman very few shops want to have to train you such as acid waste systems in a hospital or welding gas piping as your pay is just to high.

                          A well rounded plumbing education almost guarantees you will always be employed even calibrating controls like Johnson / Honeywell/ Robert Shaw controls pneumatics etc. are great to get a little hands on experience.

                          This way your not locked into one geographic area as you will have the training to go where the jobs are.

                          As a welder I could have gone to Alaska on the pipe line when most of my fellow union workers were out of a job I had a great rotation as an apprentice so I was able to go right into hospital work then under duress new construction then high pressure steam piping.

                          GRAB ALL THE EDUCATION YOU CAN as that stays with you and seeing as how your started young like I did your going to have many,many years in front of you so enjoy the ride and remember no matter how hard you try you will never ever learn it all which keeps it very interesting.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Re: The "Union"

                            Your best bet would be to contact in the Union Hall in the city where you are moving and ask them if they will accept the hours you already have in. You'll probably have to come up with some documentation to prove hours worked, etc. but it can't hurt to ask.

                            Go to http://www.ua.org/links.asp and find the Local closest to where you are moving. If they don't have a web site with contact information then use on on the UA International web site and tell them where you are moving to, they will get back to you or have some one contact you I'll bet. __________________

                            SEEMS great minds think alike unlike the left coast

                            Same advice must be doing something right

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Re: The "Union"

                              Guys,

                              I am not trying to open up a can of worms here, but are "unions" really that great.

                              In the south, they are few and far between so to speak, but all I have ever seen of them has been negative.

                              I am just trying to get a understanding as to why they are necessary in todays market.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Re: The "Union"

                                The real value to a guy like Aaron is the education which is available to him if he gets in.

                                Mark
                                "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                                I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X