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  • rinnai

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    Here is the tankless I installed this weekend when I did the re-pipe. The line to the far left is the t&p line, and all the verticles are inside the wall, so the crooked t&p isn't visable.
    Last edited by westcoastplumber; 09-30-2007, 09:06 PM.
    sigpic

    Robert

  • #2
    Re: rinnai

    Robert,

    Looks good.You done with a hard weakend.You must be tired

    What can you tell me about the vent pipe flashing and storm collar,That flashing looks intricate,is it durable looking.does the roofer have to tune it up.

    Is that the big Rinnai I can't tell.

    Can you tell I have cabin fever and can't wait to get back on the job tomorrow

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: rinnai

      robert,
      nice job w/ tankless.
      how many fixtures can this unit handle?
      what is gpm flow at what temp raise?
      what price are you getting these units for on west coast?
      was the rinnai certification class a pain in the *** - as i understand in order to purchase, the installer must be certified?
      you guys do not need drip legs on gas pipe?
      up in nj we install a lot of takagi mobius.
      big flow units w/ a big pricetag.
      work really nice for big houses.
      we even installed another manufacturer electric tankless requested by customer on a historic building.
      the thing required like 3 100 amp electric mains.
      specs said like 7 gpm flow at 50 degree rise - but water pipe inside unit is like 3/8 o.d. - maybe more like 3 gpm
      wouldnt reccommend installing one
      take care
      eric
      Last edited by ericwagner4; 10-01-2007, 07:21 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: rinnai

        Robert, nice work.
        Ironically, as you know, I did a Rheem 7.4 last week.
        They look very similar - warranty & all (except the air screen in front on the Rheem), but according to your friend John Rinnai is less expensive.
        If memory serves, one of the reasons I install Rheem is that Rinnai is 5.8 GPM.
        I went to their website and the info is vague, how many BTU/GPM is that unit?

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: rinnai

          Our gas is clean we don't need drip legs

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: rinnai

            I just have one question for you Robert. Do all Tankless heaters exhaust go vertical in Cal. or can you also go horizontal too?????

            By the way, nice job.
            Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

            http://www.contractorspub.com

            A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: rinnai

              Garager,
              Robert said he is busy and will get back to you in an hour,I would tell you but I guess you want to hear it from the horses mouth

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: rinnai

                Originally posted by drtyhands View Post
                Our gas is clean we don't need drip legs
                your gas may be clean but what happens when the inside of the pipe starts to flake off and clogs your gas valve .


                nice job rob
                Charlie

                My seek the peek fundraiser page
                http://observatory.mountwashington.o...nal&fr_id=1040


                http://www.mountwashington.org/weather/conditions.php

                new work pictures 12/09
                http://public.fotki.com/hvachawk/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: rinnai

                  Originally posted by HVAC HAWK View Post
                  your gas may be clean but what happens when the inside of the pipe starts to flake off and clogs your gas valve .


                  nice job rob
                  Replace it, would be my answer....

                  Adam, thanks for the response, I guess I'll wait till the horse talks...
                  Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                  http://www.contractorspub.com

                  A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: rinnai

                    Originally posted by HVAC HAWK View Post
                    your gas may be clean but what happens when the inside of the pipe starts to flake off and clogs your gas valve .


                    nice job rob
                    We don't have that problem either Hawk.

                    UH-OH time for us to review the old (black or gal) debate

                    I now am using nothing but gal because our gas allows me to.

                    Even though its a more expensive system.

                    Both McDonnalds Corp. and the Albertsons grocery specd that no gal was to be used on their systems that we installed.

                    This is because so many other parts of the country do not remove elements from their gas.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: rinnai

                      Personally, I'd use drip tee's with or without code requirement.
                      Just a good idea in the event there might be sediment in the line, but probably just a force of habit for me.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: rinnai

                        I would too if I lived in your area

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: rinnai

                          We aren't required to use drip legs here, either, because our gas is "clean." I, however, still use them because I know that the process of manufacturing a black steel gas system is not clean. There is no way possible to effectively clean all of the oil and chips that make their way into the pipe when you are threading. All of this matter eventually makes its way to the end of the line. And if there isn't a drip there, it will get into the gas valve. This is not speculation, but fact. I have seen it happen. I break-down several gas systems every month to repair leaks that have been present for years and always check the drips when I replace a gas water heater, so I see what collects. I have also seen the screens of gas control valves that are almost completely blocked by oil and chips from threading -- even when there was a drip present. I have also seen drips full of water that came from our "clean" gas. I don't care what minimum code dictates -- I install drip legs.

                          Bruce
                          Last edited by brucestorey; 10-02-2007, 06:23 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: rinnai

                            as adam has stated, we don't use drip legs here anymore. not sure when they stopped doing it, as i still see some old installations out there.

                            with all the new construction i worked on from 1981-1995+/- we never did drip legs. this was with 2 different companies and many thousands of separate meters. even in our union apprenticeship school, it was not taught.

                            as far as water goes. my experience is that it comes from a leaking underground gas line on the property owners side. the gas pressure we use is only 7'' w.c. the pipe is buried 12'' plus. a pin hole leak can and does fill with water. when i remove gas lines, i tend to find pipe dope on the end of the pipe due to doping fittings.

                            rick.
                            phoebe it is

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: rinnai

                              Originally posted by DuckButter View Post
                              Personally, I'd use drip tee's with or without code requirement.
                              Just a good idea in the event there might be sediment in the line, but probably just a force of habit for me.
                              DuckButter, Drip legs are not a good idea like years ago.

                              Years ago folks thought about possible moisture or cutting oil or piping flaking and thus the drip leg theory came about.

                              Now with so many non qualified gas fitters and jack legs calling themselves plumbers dabbling in gas work the drip leg is a poor idea as now some clown and make a connection to the drip and go about their merry way..

                              The way we install drip legs (max 3/4") is to use a lock wing gas cock this way if a riser needs to best tests the gas supplier can open their lock and test.

                              At the appliance like boilers and hot water heaters There are optional and Many MORONS who have no clue to what there are drip legs place them out side where they are subject to freezing or some clowns use them to support a pipe having the black plug in contract with the damp cement thus causing a future leak.

                              Lock wing gas cock and plug is an amazing deterrent from folks stealing gas from a drip leg in a multi gas riser structure

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