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Pressure testing residential gas systems

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  • #16
    Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

    Good to know you APF.
    Glad your here with us.

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    • #17
      Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

      Originally posted by DUNBAR View Post
      Does anyone test with nitrogen like on water lines in new commercial?


      You can hear the leaks at a very low low pressure. Shrieking noise that you can hear over all the background noise.
      I looked to see how heavy nitrogen was thinking that it's weight might have something to do with it making a more distinct sound than the compressed air with CO2 that I use to test my projects.
      The HVAC systems used in the buildings I work on have that dang black plastic 1/8 tubing fished all over the place.So inevitably it gets nicked or cut and hisses for the duration of the job.Makes it hard to listen for leaks.
      CO2 tanks can be refilled for $15.00,pretty reasonable.I don't know how much nitrogen costs,is it as readily available as CO2.
      Could this be,once again the forum is giving great advice.
      Thanks Dunbar

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      • #18
        Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

        Originally posted by apf View Post
        Good idea on the nitro Dunbar,thanks dirty,Robert I gotta start somewhere!I think I'm doing well moving to a city I"ve never worked in and opening shop.The prices will increase as the cust. base does.You boys keep forgetting this is not a major market and not growing up/working this area is a considerable challenge.Move to a small city,less than a million ,and ask for the large flow and see how far the average person gets....bankrupt.I grew up poor as hell ,I don't give my work away,but I look out for the common person.I have a clear conscience.

        Good morning apf, I stated in my post that for your market I was sure it was a good wage, I was venting more about things around here in my area and I kinda used your thread to do it

        I understand your market is smaller over there and you just moved and you are trying to get the word out, I am happy for you. I too grew up poor as hell, no one to give me a hand, no inheritance, made some mistakes in my life, but it all makes you stronger, and your better for it.

        Everything you get and use to build your business means so much more then as if it was handed to you. heck, maybe thats why people charge far less then they should in my area. When you have to go out and walk the streets with flyers, or do email flyers for hours on end, all you put in, your customer base is the best thing you have to prove all your hard work.

        Most people are in this business to make money, some may have it as a hobby, but for most of us, we plan on doing this for the rest of our lives and to feed our family by doing it.

        Glad to have you here apf, I am sure we are alot alike, just in 2 different markets buddy
        sigpic

        Robert

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        • #19
          Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

          I feel the same way ,glad to be here .I am not happy about my pricing at this time but feel it's a neccessary evil.It'll even out .I do al-right with tool charges as well.I don't know if they are built into the flat-rate,if I remember correctly,most flat-rate companies I worked for didn't charge extra for b-tank,demo-hammer,shop-vac,etc.I could be wrong,but anyways,it helps a bit.Have a good day.

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          • #20
            Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

            APF,
            Could the thought be configured,that this is specialty work when you use these tools and knowledge.

            "TECHY" doesn't know how to braze and probably doesn't have the equipment.He doesn't know how to run a core drill or have the equipment.Any more I would not be suprised if he did not have a pipe threading machine and was charging the customer hourly to hand thread.

            Actually you brought a good thought to bear in mind.If I have the equipment and knowledge to work twice as fast as the guy who doesn't(he does have a prettier truck than me though)why shouldn't I charge for that equipment.Flat or hour it should be in.

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            • #21
              Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

              At my prices I have to

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              • #22
                Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

                Why can't you just put on a manometer and test the system with line pressure. That will tell you immediately if you have a leak. Using high pressure takes forever and is inaccurate. When installing a new line I usually test it with 6 inches mercury (UPC). Then after all the appliances are installed and hooked up at finish I test it with 12 or 14 inches water column (depending on if it is Nat or Propane).

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                • #23
                  Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

                  That is also a good way to test.But ,my discussion was on bidding/flat-rating the disconnect,pressurizing,and returning after inspection to re-connect and light the appliances.Anyone have a flat-rate number?

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                  • #24
                    Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

                    Gas Line pressure test only needs to be 1 1/2 times the working pressure. So 15 lbs is way too much to start with and if you're using a Rodgers gauge or a manometer they will not read that high. Disconnecting and capping the appliances is also a waste of time. Just turn off the gas valves. Make sure you do because even 3lbs will destroy many gas valves.
                    sigpic

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                    • #25
                      Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

                      Originally posted by drtyhands View Post
                      I just ran an add in my local newspaper under an alias,trying to scare the people into thinking their house could explode if they don't get the gas checked.

                      Next week I'll mail out flyers for inspection services

                      I'm also currently offering a 20% discount on sasquatch repellent to all first time customers.



                      Wow, that explains the increase in gas related tests

                      I charge $350.00 for all, the test, the cap off, the permit etc.

                      If the customer has spring loaded shut offs or bad flex lines, that is at an additional material charge.
                      sigpic

                      Robert

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                      • #26
                        Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

                        Originally posted by NHMaster3015 View Post
                        Gas Line pressure test only needs to be 1 1/2 times the working pressure. So 15 lbs is way too much to start with and if you're using a Rodgers gauge or a manometer they will not read that high. Disconnecting and capping the appliances is also a waste of time. Just turn off the gas valves. Make sure you do because even 3lbs will destroy many gas valves.
                        I don't quite understand NHM.If someone were to ask me to test the integrity of their gas piping,I would isolate the equipment and pump up the system to the required UPC pressure of 15lbs.Is there something I did not catch on a previous post.

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                        • #27
                          Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

                          Originally posted by drtyhands View Post
                          I don't quite understand NHM.If someone were to ask me to test the integrity of their gas piping,I would isolate the equipment and pump up the system to the required UPC pressure of 15lbs.Is there something I did not catch on a previous post.


                          UPC calls for a 15 lbs test? I thought it was 10 lbs
                          sigpic

                          Robert

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                          • #28
                            Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

                            Originally posted by westcoastplumber View Post
                            UPC calls for a 15 lbs test? I thought it was 10 lbs
                            AAAHH!!!! Thanks Robert,you have know Idea how many times I use the 15lbs.Just a little thickheaded,HUH?

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                            • #29
                              Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

                              Adam,

                              I was taught and have taught to pump the system to 15 psig. That way if the inspector wants to bleed it to 10psig before the test he can.

                              Mark
                              "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                              I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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                              • #30
                                Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

                                Originally posted by NHMaster3015 View Post
                                Disconnecting and capping the appliances is also a waste of time. Just turn off the gas valves.

                                It is good to cap and then test because gas shut valves can and will leak and throw off the test.
                                sigpic

                                Robert

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