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Pressure testing residential gas systems

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  • #31
    Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

    Originally posted by drtyhands View Post
    AAAHH!!!! Thanks Robert,you have know Idea how many times I use the 15lbs.Just a little thickheaded,HUH?

    15# gauge, no longer allowed to use a 30# gauge.

    i actually had an inspector many years ago break with his hands, any gauge that was not reading down to 0 when he let the air out after the test.

    very impressive.

    rick.
    phoebe it is

    Comment


    • #32
      Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

      Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
      15# gauge, no longer allowed to use a 30# gauge.

      i actually had an inspector many years ago break with his hands, any gauge that was not reading down to 0 when he let the air out after the test.

      very impressive.

      rick.
      Was that in Irvine, Rick?
      the dog

      Comment


      • #33
        Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

        Originally posted by plumbdog10 View Post
        Was that in Irvine, Rick?
        dog it was downtown l.a. going back to 1981

        i'll come up with his name. it wasn't schuman he was also tuff. so was clifton.

        rick.

        inspector gillman comes to mind?
        Last edited by PLUMBER RICK; 12-16-2007, 10:48 AM. Reason: memory loss
        phoebe it is

        Comment


        • #34
          Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

          Isn't Lee Clifton in charge of Code Enforcement now? I recall sitting in one of his code classes once.

          Mark
          "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

          I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

          Comment


          • #35
            Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

            Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
            Isn't Lee Clifton in charge of Code Enforcement now? I recall sitting in one of his code classes once.

            Mark

            yes he is.

            rick.
            phoebe it is

            Comment


            • #36
              Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

              Will that repellent work on skunk ape?

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

                Originally posted by NHMaster3015 View Post
                Gas Line pressure test only needs to be 1 1/2 times the working pressure. So 15 lbs is way too much to start with and if you're using a Rodgers gauge or a manometer they will not read that high. Disconnecting and capping the appliances is also a waste of time. Just turn off the gas valves. Make sure you do because even 3lbs will destroy many gas valves.
                Same here in MA, either 1-1/2 times operating pressure or 3 PSI, whichever is lower...which means 3 PSI almost always on gas with a low pressure guage that goes to 7 PSI so you can see any movement.
                These UPC guys don't realise there are other codes.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

                  the upc may want 15 lbs, I never really get involved with the upc. The national fuel gas code, and the ipc both want 1 1/2 times working pressure.
                  sigpic

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                  • #39
                    Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

                    guys, out here our gas pressure (natural) inside the building is only 7'' water column.

                    so your 1.5 times working pressure would still only be 10.5'' water column.

                    we might as well blow into the line to fill it for a test.

                    10# on low pressure 65# on med pressure or welded systems.

                    rick.
                    phoebe it is

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

                      Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
                      so your 1.5 times working pressure would still only be 10.5'' water column.

                      we might as well blow into the line to fill it for a test.
                      I stand GRAVELY corrected...I'd meant to say whichever is higher - 1.5 times working pressure, or 3 PSI.
                      I'd just woken up...note the time of my post....thats my story, I'm sticking to it.
                      Also, please try to understand, this is a source of major frustration for me and others I'm sure...what you might consider bad plumbing or bad practice has worked here for decades.
                      I just try to learn the common denominators, it's a curiousity to see the differences in our codes, food for thought on why those differences exist.
                      In reference to testing at 15 PSI, let me make an interesting point....
                      The reason we are required to use a gauge that reads 7 PSI max is so we can see the slightest changes in pressure over a small amount of time.
                      If that needle budges so much as the width of the needle, the inspector will fail it. ( this does create small problems with rapid temperature changes in weather)
                      A needle on a gauge that reads at least 15 PSI will be harder to see those small changes because the range of motion is much greater.

                      More isn't always better.

                      I'd like to learn the reasons we have these differences, without sensing any level of disdain over them.
                      A perfectly obvious example, earthquake restraints.
                      If I used them on a heater, the inspector might think I was a hack playing guessing games, you guys have to use them or you look like a hack.
                      I'd still like to learn why we use full size VTR while you guys can break them up...I'm almost positive it's because of hoar frost, yet at one point a member commented that we were outdated for doing that, it hadn't been in their code for years.
                      NHMaster....puuulllleease stick around...we need ya.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

                        Originally posted by DuckButter View Post

                        I'd like to learn the reasons we have these differences, without sensing any level of disdain over them.
                        Perhaps the east coast guys system would not pass at 15 psig?

                        Mark
                        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

                          Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
                          Perhaps the east coast guys system would not pass at 15 psig?

                          Mark
                          Budda bing...budda boom!
                          Mark, no lie...I was on a job years ago where the licensed guy put his test at 5.
                          The inspector almost failed him, made him drop it to 3 and waited.
                          I used to test at 10 to be sure prior to inspection, my theory was that it would drop much faster at higher PSI's and save time in the event I wasn't holding, but my experience has shown me it drops at about the same rate, regardless of pressure.
                          The only time I use higher pressure is to be able to hear any hissing on a line that isn't holding...in the event leak detector hasn't shown anything.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

                            Here's the problem with testing at pressures over 5lbs. It's near impossible to find a gauge that will "accurately" read small pressure drops. If you use a u-tube manometer 10 lbs of pressure will spray the water all over the place. The gas utility (Northern Utilities in our region) mandates testing with either a rogers or similar gauge or a manometer, and at 1 1/2 lbs working pressure which for most natural gas installations would be abour 3lbs. You don't have to crank up the pressure to find a leak. If you take a read through the a National Fuel Gas code you will find that 1 1/2 lbs x working is the standard. If I had a copy handy I would quote it directly but we're in the middle of a Northeaster and I'm not driving down to the shop today, maybe not tomorrow either
                            sigpic

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                            • #44
                              Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

                              Originally posted by NHMaster3015 View Post
                              Here's the problem with testing at pressures over 5lbs. It's near impossible to find a gauge that will "accurately" read small pressure drops.
                              I've been wondering why testing on gas lines is done in psig when it should be W.C.? I've always used a digital manometer to test gas pressure. Glad to see I wasn't off my rocker.
                              Buy cheap, buy twice.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Re: Pressure testing residential gas systems

                                Originally posted by gear junkie View Post
                                I've been wondering why testing on gas lines is done in psig when it should be W.C.? I've always used a digital manometer to test gas pressure. Glad to see I wasn't off my rocker.
                                ben, we are referring to testing a new installation. typically the gauges sit on the line for days waiting for the inspector to show.

                                your digital is great for testing the regulator, but not practical for a ruff inspection test.

                                rick.
                                phoebe it is

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