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  • #16
    Re: For your veiwing pleasure

    Originally posted by Wild Weasel View Post
    WTF? $400k starter home? What sort of place is that??
    That's the Alberta advantage
    You will never expand your mind, if you do not challenge your beliefs.

    By the reading of this post, you acknowledge and agree that the poster shall not be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with use of or reliance on any content contained herein.

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    • #17
      Re: For your veiwing pleasure

      Originally posted by westcoastplumber View Post
      I believe that would be the combustion air, a upper and lower combustion air, that must be the upper combustion air, the lower one would be piped down to the floor.
      As I stated in my previous reply, the unfinished duct work is for the fresh air exchanger.( Notice the hangers poking down in pic 4.)

      Up north here combustion air intakes must be run in insulated ducting. The only gas fired appliance in the mechanical room requiring combustion air is the boiler and it's a sealed unit. Upper and lower combustion air? Must be a California thing
      You will never expand your mind, if you do not challenge your beliefs.

      By the reading of this post, you acknowledge and agree that the poster shall not be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with use of or reliance on any content contained herein.

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      • #18
        Re: For your veiwing pleasure

        Originally posted by Hondahead View Post
        As I stated in my previous reply, the unfinished duct work is for the fresh air exchanger.( Notice the hangers poking down in pic 4.)

        Up north here combustion air intakes must be run in insulated ducting. The only gas fired appliance in the mechanical room requiring combustion air is the boiler and it's a sealed unit. Upper and lower combustion air? Must be a California thing


        I must have missed that, thanks Honda.

        Mechanical rooms that I have done have needed combustion air duct at the cieling and then one piped down to the floor, about 8"-12" off the ground.

        I had one job, it was three water heaters and the inspector made us do this for a 4 story building It was 2 6" ducts, then the venting for the water heaters, it was not fun running up all the floors and having to fit the ducts in with the new venting for the water heaters.
        I will always remember that job
        sigpic

        Robert

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        • #19
          Re: For your veiwing pleasure

          Robert,when a space reaches a certain cubic area they are not needed.The upper and lower are generally for more confined spaces(closets).

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          • #20
            Re: For your veiwing pleasure

            Originally posted by drtyhands View Post
            Robert,when a space reaches a certain cubic area they are not needed.The upper and lower are generally for more confined spaces(closets).

            I understand this, this was a confined area.

            I should have pointed this out.
            sigpic

            Robert

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            • #21
              Re: For your veiwing pleasure

              Honda,

              Wait til my hubby finds your tool porn. . .he will be sooo happy
              I love my plumber

              "My Hero"

              Welcome, Phoebe Jacqueline!

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: For your veiwing pleasure

                Originally posted by drtyhands View Post
                Robert,when a space reaches a certain cubic area they are not needed.The upper and lower are generally for more confined spaces(closets).

                If I remember correctly (I am too lazy to look it up right now) the IBC requires a minimum of 50 cubic feet per 1,000 Btu.

                Regards,

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: For your veiwing pleasure

                  Originally posted by biscuit View Post
                  If I remember correctly (I am too lazy to look it up right now) the IBC requires a minimum of 50 cubic feet per 1,000 Btu.

                  Regards,
                  Thats probably subjective to local code, 1k btu in Texas is a big difference from 1k btu in Minnesota when it comes to heat relative to average outside temperatures. (though I think your IBC quote probably covers the most extreme possibilities)
                  This point was made to me by a local inspector I often pull permits with, we were talking about vent-free gas logs and he said they are very common in more southern states.
                  We just approved them not too long ago, but many towns still ban them, the idea is that they only use as many BTU's as a standard stove/oven (30-40K).
                  His point was that we don't use ovens to heat any portion of our homes, they only stay on for a few hours at most.
                  Here we have to put intake air in any mechanical room with a boiler that doesn't have direct venting, regardless the size, we also must have co detectors installed right off the boilers circuit by a licensed electrician.
                  Every year there are a few stories about co poisoning or deaths here in the winter from illegal installations or outdated boilers.
                  One family with small children died a few years back when snow covered the exhaust vent on their boiler, so the state immediately made it manditory that we install all exhausts according to the national weather service's estimated snow fall for the area plus the MFG specs (on state approved products).

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                  • #24
                    Re: For your veiwing pleasure

                    hey honda im from deadmonton interested in a switch in companies? we pay high and ride in nice trucks. we dont do new construction soo its all good in winter. pm me and ill see if i can make it worth your while
                    how is it that so many answers are in the instructions

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                    • #25
                      Re: For your veiwing pleasure

                      Originally posted by DuckButter View Post
                      Thats probably subjective to local code, 1k btu in Texas is a big difference from 1k btu in Minnesota when it comes to heat relative to average outside temperatures. (though I think your IBC quote probably covers the most extreme possibilities)
                      This point was made to me by a local inspector I often pull permits with, we were talking about vent-free gas logs and he said they are very common in more southern states.
                      We just approved them not too long ago, but many towns still ban them, the idea is that they only use as many BTU's as a standard stove/oven (30-40K).
                      His point was that we don't use ovens to heat any portion of our homes, they only stay on for a few hours at most.
                      Here we have to put intake air in any mechanical room with a boiler that doesn't have direct venting, regardless the size, we also must have co detectors installed right off the boilers circuit by a licensed electrician.
                      Every year there are a few stories about co poisoning or deaths here in the winter from illegal installations or outdated boilers.
                      One family with small children died a few years back when snow covered the exhaust vent on their boiler, so the state immediately made it manditory that we install all exhausts according to the national weather service's estimated snow fall for the area plus the MFG specs (on state approved products).

                      You are correct in that we do see a lot of vent free gas log fireplaces in new construction here (Mississippi).

                      I have two of them in my home but dont really use them. For some reason I just dont like them. My reasons get too deep/complicated to discuss here.

                      Regards,

                      Comment

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