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  • #16
    Re: electric tankless water heaters

    tell her to spend her money on this, you can hook a recirc right to it with no warrenty issues, it stores 8 gallons of hot water and has a 20 year warrenty!

    Up to three baths on the smaller unit, 5-8 on the larger unit, depends on shower heads, body sprays etc of course.

    http://www.eternalwaterheater.com/Et...027%202007.pdf

    approx 1800 for the smaller unit.
    sigpic

    Robert

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    • #17
      Re: electric tankless water heaters

      Thanks for all your replies
      I don't know why she wont use gas (LP only,we're on a barrier island).
      I'm supposed to receive a cut sheet on the water heaters today. If that happens, I'll post the spec's.
      I'll have the manufacturer size the units and forward this information to the electrician (who will most likely have a cow).
      Mike

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      • #18
        Re: electric tankless water heaters

        If you can post your electric rates per KWH, what she would be paying for LP and the AFUE of the gas tankless, I can calculate which would be cheaper to operate.

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        • #19
          Re: electric tankless water heaters

          Do the any of the tankless (electric or gas) modulate their inputs based on flows?

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          • #20
            Re: electric tankless water heaters

            From Rinnai's web page.

            1. What does it mean when Rinnai says that the R85i fires from 15,000 to 180,000 btus / hour?

            Unlike old style tank water heaters which fire at only one rate, most modern tankless water heaters will use only the amount of gas necessary to heat the hot water being used at any given time. To do this they measure the incoming water temperature and the flow rate, compare that to the desired output temperature, and fire at the rate necessary to meet this need. If you change any of these variables, the tankless unit re-calculates and adjusts its firing rate accordingly. The tankless unit will therefore fire anywhere between its minimum and maximum firing rate.
            Rinnai units offer the lowest minimum flow rates available. As with minimum flow rates, the lower the minimum firing rate the more flexibility you will have when you only want a small amount of hot water.
            Last edited by glkearns; 02-08-2008, 02:16 AM.

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            • #21
              Re: electric tankless water heaters

              Good News
              Someone with intelligence and influence must have talked to the homeowner (we plumbers have neither). We will be installing Noritz (Rinnai) water heaters.
              I don't know why she had such a negative reaction to our suggesting other means of producing hot water. I may put together a small booklet to show the positives and negatives of each type of heater. That may help customers come to their own conclusions as to what will work best for them, not being told what to use by some guy half covered in purple primer and feces
              So to sum up this thread,one person in southern California had good luck with an electric tankless water heater.

              Thanks
              Mike

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              • #22
                Re: electric tankless water heaters

                15,000 to 180,000 BTU's - that's a pretty high degree of modulation. That's 12:1 modulation. But out of curiousity does it do that with a high efficiency rating?

                I've installed quite a few IBC VFC 15-150 Boilers that have a 10:1 modulation rating with 93-97% efficiency (depending on how hot you need the water) and that is considered a very good modulation ratio.

                Just trying to become a bit more educated here on these tankless gas hot water heaters..
                When a tankless fires up, is there a pre-purge performed? If so, wouldn't that delay you getting your hot water? Just about any other gas fired appliance I know of does a pre-purge but somehow I wonder if a pre-purge would almost negate getting you instant or relatively instant hot water based on flow...can someone enlighten me a bit. Wouldn't not having a pre-purge be a bit dangerous? What if there was a leaky gas valve or something that let out a dangerous air/fuel mixture around the burner/up the flue, etc?

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                • #23
                  Re: electric tankless water heaters

                  I am installing two electric tankless units at a nuke plant right now. They are supplying hot water for a shower and lav. They will be used for decon purposes if a worker gets crapped up. The building water supply is a hose with a Chicago fitting. At least it goes thru a RPZ. The job would probably take me and an apprentice about 1 week in the real world. Inside the fence, it's at least 3 weeks. At least they make the electricity on site.

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                  • #24
                    Re: electric tankless water heaters

                    Originally posted by Scott K View Post
                    15,000 to 180,000 BTU's - that's a pretty high degree of modulation. That's 12:1 modulation. But out of curiousity does it do that with a high efficiency rating?

                    I've installed quite a few IBC VFC 15-150 Boilers that have a 10:1 modulation rating with 93-97% efficiency (depending on how hot you need the water) and that is considered a very good modulation ratio.

                    Just trying to become a bit more educated here on these tankless gas hot water heaters..
                    When a tankless fires up, is there a pre-purge performed? If so, wouldn't that delay you getting your hot water? Just about any other gas fired appliance I know of does a pre-purge but somehow I wonder if a pre-purge would almost negate getting you instant or relatively instant hot water based on flow...can someone enlighten me a bit. Wouldn't not having a pre-purge be a bit dangerous? What if there was a leaky gas valve or something that let out a dangerous air/fuel mixture around the burner/up the flue, etc?
                    there is about a 3 second delay compared to a tank type heater. part of this is due to the start up procedure, the other part is the heating delay process.

                    very good question and observation on your part

                    rick.
                    phoebe it is

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                    • #25
                      Re: electric tankless water heaters

                      1st off. I actually installed one of the Home depot chinese made electric tankless heaters (the small 120v one) above the slop sink in my own shop. It's been there for almost 2 years now, works great for what I wanted to do and thats wash my hands with how water. I got suckered into installing the old Paloma Pac and ELM Aquastar instantaneous water heaters when they first came out. Though we had our share or problems with them I suppose they were'nt all that bad. Somehow though they left a bad taste im my mouth and I have to say that I was very leary when the Rinnai units hit the market. That said, and having installed a pile of Rinnai's and Baxi's, these new products are simply amazing. We have had virtually no service problems and nothing but very happy customers. How long they will continue to operate properly, who knows? but for now I would recommend the Rinnai to just about anyone.
                      sigpic

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                      • #26
                        Re: electric tankless water heaters

                        I never read any where about this tank less water heaters. Your discussion helped me to learn new things. Thanks for sharing with us.
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                        • #27
                          Re: electric tankless water heaters

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