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  • Flushing Boiler systems...

    I was at a little introductory service seminar at IBC last night (http://www.ibcboiler.com/)
    (my company utilizes these boilers for our installations both as re & re's and for new home construction - either as primary heat source for radiant, DHW, air handler and/or pool heating or as back up or supplemental heat for a geothermal systems we install) where we got to learn a bit about the boilers and a few troubleshooting scenarios, etc. - Very informative. So speaking with the owners/designers and such we got to know a few of the quirks and growing pains of these boilers. These boilers have been very reliable for us and that is why my boss prefers to use them, plus the company is local. The few growing pains they have told us about are very minute and easy issues (not consistent issues - seem to be isolated cases that are very fixable) to solve compared to other issues from other boiler companies that I have heard about. These Boilers are also extremely efficient with a 10:1 modulating ratio and they have a very flat effieicny curve from lowest degree of modulation to the highest fire rate which is better than comparable Viesmann's which have high efficiencies at low modulation and the efficiency drops off at highest fire rate.

    ANYWAYS, the guys there indicated that they have had a few problems with sensors that they think might be flux or water chemistry related. They've experienced the very odd warranty call where the boiler has a bit of a hum to it when firing. The technical guy at this company tried a product called Fernox which is a cleansing agent for hydronic heating systems that he circulated through the system and he said it got rid of these types of problems. They also have had a few sensor related issues which they think could be related to greasy or "oily" water or suspended organics. Keep in mind these are very minute issues they report - maybe a 1/4 a percent of all boilers sold or less and when they get the call they either fluxh the system, replace the sensor, or both, and it's done. But our company may adopt as policy of pre-flushing any system before we install with a fernox product or similar just to ensure we don't have any call backs and for simple pride in our work reasons - we install these things to last with no issues. We're also trying to establish a service scheme for these boilers when we initiate service contracts with the customers who's homes we install these into.

    I'm curious if any of you guys could outline your procedures for boiler commissioning - does it include such a step of a pre-flush with some type of chemical (if not use glycol or other coolant/anti-freeze type of chemical but just water as a heating medium). I'm also curious if you guys do flush them, if you could give me a bit of a methodology you utilize to introduce the additives or chemicals? Do you have some sort of bread & butter pump set up that does this well. Do you install any special valves for such a thing, etc etc. ?

  • #2
    Re: Flushing Boiler systems...

    hey scott,
    in the province to the east of you we use 2 chemicals when finishing up a boiler system. 1) after your all piped in and circing for a day(just making sure you dont find a big leak and piss all your chemical away) we use FERROQUEST. our number one step to de-grease, de-oil the pipe and let that run for a couple days with the boiler working normal. 2)Then we flush for 24-36 hrs and take sample and make sure its gone, we add our final chemical CORRISHELD and thats the baby to take care of the rust/and mineral build up and thats all she wrote. Hopwfully that kinda helped. if need more info let me know ill get it for you.

    Chris
    if u cant bedazzle em with briliance, baffle em with bulls&*t

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Flushing Boiler systems...

      Careful with the newer condensing boilers, propylene glycol will void some warranties...best bet is call MFG before adding anything to be sure it's ok with them.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Flushing Boiler systems...

        Hey Row - thanks for the info. What type of pump or part do you utilize to introduce these chemicals into the boiler system? You know I was honestly just thinking that the best way would be just a straight hydrostatic test pump. It would take longer but by the time you set up some type of pump the hydrostatic pump would be done it's job, as long as it was dedicated to these chemicals only obviously.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Flushing Boiler systems...

          I use a drill pump with a couple short pieces of garden hose. I have a few different adaptors for different size containers and I strategically locate a few boiler drains.
          You will never expand your mind, if you do not challenge your beliefs.

          By the reading of this post, you acknowledge and agree that the poster shall not be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with use of or reliance on any content contained herein.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Flushing Boiler systems...

            Originally posted by DuckButter View Post
            Careful with the newer condensing boilers, propylene glycol will void some warranties...best bet is call MFG before adding anything to be sure it's ok with them.

            Good point, always use what the MFG wants, proprietary blend Keep the glycol seperate, I prefer the plate type exchangers, apparently the tube and shell type last longer though?
            You will never expand your mind, if you do not challenge your beliefs.

            By the reading of this post, you acknowledge and agree that the poster shall not be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with use of or reliance on any content contained herein.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Flushing Boiler systems...

              Originally posted by Hondahead View Post
              Good point, always use what the MFG wants, proprietary blend Keep the glycol seperate, I prefer the plate type exchangers, apparently the tube and shell type last longer though?
              Couldn't tell you..very little radiant heat this way, usually high end construction. (rich peeps)
              I've worked with Wirsbo (plate, I think) exchangers when I was with a shop that had high end customers and boy they make an art of confusion.
              Although condensing boilers work about 5% better at lower temps (140f as opposed to 180)..after talking a homeowner into paying as much as $4K more for a high efficiency boiler, it's a tall order to get them interested in adding radiant or additional equipment such as an exchanger to allow propylene.

              Which arouses a good question...you get alot of negative feedback on radiant?

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Flushing Boiler systems...

                Originally posted by Scott K View Post
                Hey Row - thanks for the info. What type of pump or part do you utilize to introduce these chemicals into the boiler system? You know I was honestly just thinking that the best way would be just a straight hydrostatic test pump. It would take longer but by the time you set up some type of pump the hydrostatic pump would be done it's job, as long as it was dedicated to these chemicals only obviously.
                usually we add the chemicals throught the pot feeder and use the system pumps to circ it around, if not u can, like the others have said though a hydrostatic pump through any hose connection, alot harder but equally as functional.
                if u cant bedazzle em with briliance, baffle em with bulls&*t

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Flushing Boiler systems...

                  Originally posted by Scott K View Post
                  Hey Row - thanks for the info. What type of pump or part do you utilize to introduce these chemicals into the boiler system? You know I was honestly just thinking that the best way would be just a straight hydrostatic test pump. It would take longer but by the time you set up some type of pump the hydrostatic pump would be done it's job, as long as it was dedicated to these chemicals only obviously.
                  Originally posted by DuckButter View Post
                  Couldn't tell you..very little radiant heat this way, usually high end construction. (rich peeps)
                  I've worked with Wirsbo (plate, I think) exchangers when I was with a shop that had high end customers and boy they make an art of confusion.
                  Although condensing boilers work about 5% better at lower temps (140f as opposed to 180)..after talking a homeowner into paying as much as $4K more for a high efficiency boiler, it's a tall order to get them interested in adding radiant or additional equipment such as an exchanger to allow propylene.

                  Which arouses a good question...you get alot of negative feedback on radiant?
                  tube and shell is the way to go....but.... plate type there is always room for expansion to add more plates if need more heat.
                  if u cant bedazzle em with briliance, baffle em with bulls&*t

                  Comment

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