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  • Ridgid Hand Test pump 1450 problems

    For pumping up our water lines to 200 PSI for the inspector the company I work for has two of these. They are both relatively new, and we consistently have problems with them and both of them are essentially shot with maybe 10-20% of their original pump capacity. They pump great at first,I can get an entire suite up to test (2 bathroom groups, kitchen, laundry tray, etc. 1000-1500 sq. feet) in 5 minutes tops usually (not it takes like 25 minutes!). We eventually take them in to get them fixed but I'm just wondering what is the weak link in these if anyone knows? Or if there is a better pump you guys can recommend that will last longer? These things don't require rocket science to use. They just don't seem to be built for heavy use from what I've seen, which is unfortunate, becuase the only person who would buy one will probably actually use it.

    [ 12-14-2005, 10:36 PM: Message edited by: Scott K ]

  • #2
    Originally posted by Scott K:
    For pumping up our water lines to 200 PSI for the inspector the company I work for has two of these. They are both relatively new, and we consistently have problems with them and both of them are essentially shot with maybe 10-20% of their original pump capacity. They pump great at first,I can get an entire suite up to test (2 bathroom groups, kitchen, laundry tray, etc. 1000-1500 sq. feet) in 5 minutes tops usually (not it takes like 25 minutes!). We eventually take them in to get them fixed but I'm just wondering what is the weak link in these if anyone knows? Or if there is a better pump you guys can recommend that will last longer? These things don't require rocket science to use. They just don't seem to be built for heavy use from what I've seen, which is unfortunate, becuase the only person who would buy one will probably actually use it.
    I'm not particularly framiliar with the hand pumps, so it might help to provide a better discription of how the pump is failing. There is a proper proceedure to hydrostatically test water piping. Not saying you don't know how to do it, but please re-post with a better discription and we can go from there.

    the dog
    the dog

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    • #3
      Dog,
      It's not exactly something that requires brain surgery.

      You close off the system and we test through the laundry box in each suite because there are laundry box valves we can tie a test assembly with gauge onto. We then tie the hand pump into that. You fill the hand pump with water, and the pump squeezes that extra water into the system which increases pressure obviously.

      The problem is with the pump itself. Normally you lift the pump handle and push down and there is a bit of resistance which you have to push against on the handle to push the water through the assembly and into the system (and with repeated pumpings you slowly but surely build the pressure up to the required test pressure). Now what happens is when you lift the handle you have to wait a second or two or three for the resistance to build itself up, so to speak, in the handle, so it actually will push water into the system. If you lift the handle right away and then try and push it down right away there is no resistance to pushing it down indicating it is not pushing anything into the system on that handle stroke, so again, you have to wait. It is really frustrating because these things work really well when they are new and then it seems to be quickly down hill from there. And obviously a plumbing company can't function without some form of test pump.

      We've looked into building a test assembly with electric pump, etc, but I honestly think these hand pumps are tough to beat when you're walking from suite to suite all day testing and they don't take long to pump up one suite (maybe 5 minutes tops?) when they are new/in good working order.

      [ 12-17-2005, 12:37 PM: Message edited by: Scott K ]

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      • #4
        scott, sounds like a sticking check valve.
        they do make a very small electric hydrostatic test pump. check with wheeler rex.

        rick.

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        • #5
          Hey Rick
          Thanks for the lead, I found wheeler rex's website and I am giving the info to my boss so he can pursue one potentially. The small one you talk of though I believe is DC'd according to their website, but they do have a slightly larger electric one up to 300 PSI, and they also have some simple, yet heavy duty looking manual pumps as well. The school I went to for 1st year apprenticeship class had a few wheeler rex threading machines and they weren't too bad. Nothing like the Ridgid's but they did the trick for smaller black iron threading duties and such perfect.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Scott K:
            Dog,
            It's not exactly something that requires brain surgery.

            You close off the system and we test through the laundry box in each suite because there are laundry box valves we can tie a test assembly with gauge onto. We then tie the hand pump into that. You fill the hand pump with water, and the pump squeezes that extra water into the system which increases pressure obviously.

            The problem is with the pump itself. Normally you lift the pump handle and push down and there is a bit of resistance which you have to push against on the handle to push the water through the assembly and into the system (and with repeated pumpings you slowly but surely build the pressure up to the required test pressure). Now what happens is when you lift the handle you have to wait a second or two or three for the resistance to build itself up, so to speak, in the handle, so it actually will push water into the system. If you lift the handle right away and then try and push it down right away there is no resistance to pushing it down indicating it is not pushing anything into the system on that handle stroke, so again, you have to wait. It is really frustrating because these things work really well when they are new and then it seems to be quickly down hill from there. And obviously a plumbing company can't function without some form of test pump.

            We've looked into building a test assembly with electric pump, etc, but I honestly think these hand pumps are tough to beat when you're walking from suite to suite all day testing and they don't take long to pump up one suite (maybe 5 minutes tops?) when they are new/in good working order.
            You're post answered the question. I was asking wether the seals were leaking, the pump was not producing, or it was not building pressure because you had a leak or did not properly bleed the air from the system.

            the dog
            the dog

            Comment


            • #7
              I printed off this discussion on top of some of the pages of the Wheeler Rex website (with the hydrostatic testers) for my boss and he says he is pretty impressed with what you guys had to say and such. Thanks again!

              Comment

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